Starting out....again.

tarawatarawa Posts: 150 Deckhand
When I first decided to start saltwater fly fishing, I made the mistake of not getting the correct rod. I purchased a nice saltwater outfit without really knowing the mechanics of fly fishing. The Temple Forks rod and Reddington reel seemed like the perfect set-up, except that I couldn't cast it. Apparently, the rod was more suited for an expert to use. I couldn't get it to load (if that is the correct term). Just the tip of the rod would bend. A really good fly fisherman / outfitter told me to sell the rod and purchase a rod that would load (?) correctly. Of course he threw a fly with my rod like it was nothing. Ended up buying a Sage rod that he suggested and now I am finally able to cast a fly....somewhat. After three years., I think that I am over the embarassment of not being able to cast and will give it another go.
Maybe a lesson or two would help.
Life Is For Service

Replies

  • beyondhelpbeyondhelp Posts: 392 Deckhand
    Sounds like you're on the right track. I took a handful of (free) lessons and they made a big difference but the biggest change I saw was after I spent a bunch of time actually fishing. Practice casting on the lawn helped but fishing is a world apart.

    I'm far from an expert, but I suggest to anyone practice alot in the exact conditions or worse than you expect to fish. I can usually sneak 10-15 minutes or so casting in the canal behind my house every couple of days. When I started I think the neighbors had a chance at the $10,000 video prize. Now, I usually can manage to catch at least one small bass or something. But, the real prize is that I am very familiar with the rods I use and I even strung up a $20 WalMart fly rod that casts like a broomstick and I can cast just as well with it. I especially like practicing when the weather is off. Casting when there is no way to avoid the wind is a challenge. Practicing in adverse conditions really showed me what is possible.

    When I get back out on the boat, I can tell a huge difference in my casts now. Wind isn't an issue and I'm not risking life and limb casting heavy weighted flies anymore.
    John.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • sunflowersunflower Posts: 435 Deckhand

    You are doing yourself a major disservice. Frankly, casting a fly isn't that hard, and certainly can be done fairly well with any rod. I would have a serious doubt about the "solution" being changing out a $250 Temple Fork rod for a $500 Sage ...

    Anyone can cast a bit with an hour-long lesson. Your 9-year-old daughter could cast a Clouser far enough to catch a bass or snook. Maybe not 60 feet, maybe not into a tough wind ... but you could do it. You probably have some very simple mechanical problem with your stroke that could be easily fixed. Or some weird line-weight/rod-weight mismatch, or you are trying to cast a giant popper. Spring for a lesson, and enjoy the sport.

    Mark
    Mark

    grace finds goodness in everything ...



  • tarawatarawa Posts: 150 Deckhand
    I really think that lessons in casting would be the best. I can cast a fly across the canal where I live and have caught bass. This is with a 5wt rod that I purchased after my saltwater outfit. I bought a Sage rod for around $300 and sold the other rod for what I had in it. There is a big difference now, but I am far from accomplished. More practice at the canal and in my yard. A 60' cast would make me happy!
    My original set up was purchased at a fly shop in Stuart Fl. I forget the name though.
    Life Is For Service
  • DogmanDogman Posts: 450 Deckhand
    I've just started out as well and while I'm far from being able to cast any significant distance every time I go out and practice I get a little better. I tried out in the wind yesterday and what an ego hit. I could barely push the fly ten feet. My back casts were very nice though :wink I'm going to grab some lessons as soon as I can, but for now its just youtube and I.
    2013 Native Watercraft Slayer 14.5 (Sand) - His
    2010 Wilderness Systems Tarpon 100 (Mango) - Hers
    ________________________________________________
    Lost Fishing - You know it's where you'd rather be!
  • jumboshrimpjumboshrimp Posts: 820 Officer
    My rod is a 12 year old, world wide sportsman 8wt and it is the first and only saltwater rod I have owned. My dad has a high end Sage and I can't stand it - my point here is not saying that you are wrong for going from TFO to sage my point is that you have to use a rod that feels right to you. Lessons would certainly help as would hours of practice. but i do a lot of "practice" mentally just by watching videos online since I live in an apartment. my favorite videos are with Mel Krieger. Like this one on youtube - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JW1C5jxL48E&list=PLDC0971CC9AAE2AFB&index=8&feature=plpp_video Good Luck! :thumbsup
  • mtd885mtd885 Posts: 1,159 Officer
    My rod is a 12 year old, world wide sportsman 8wt and it is the first and only saltwater rod I have owned. My dad has a high end Sage and I can't stand it - my point here is not saying that you are wrong for going from TFO to sage my point is that you have to use a rod that feels right to you. Lessons would certainly help as would hours of practice. but i do a lot of "practice" mentally just by watching videos online since I live in an apartment. my favorite videos are with Mel Krieger. Like this one on youtube - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JW1C5jxL48E&list=PLDC0971CC9AAE2AFB&index=8&feature=plpp_video Good Luck! :thumbsup

    I was lucky to be in the right place at the right time to have Mel teach me to cast and ultimately become my friend. He was in it for the pure joy factor it gives back to you. I agree, watch some You Tube of Mel and understand, that man is euphoric opening this 'addiction' up to folks looking for a legal high. Beware it is a costly hobby! WHUMP ON!
  • DogmanDogman Posts: 450 Deckhand
    My rod is a 12 year old, world wide sportsman 8wt and it is the first and only saltwater rod I have owned. My dad has a high end Sage and I can't stand it - my point here is not saying that you are wrong for going from TFO to sage my point is that you have to use a rod that feels right to you. Lessons would certainly help as would hours of practice. but i do a lot of "practice" mentally just by watching videos online since I live in an apartment. my favorite videos are with Mel Krieger. Like this one on youtube - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JW1C5jxL48E&list=PLDC0971CC9AAE2AFB&index=8&feature=plpp_video Good Luck! :thumbsup

    Thats a great video. After watching it I noticed some things I am doing wrong. Lots more practice in my future.
    2013 Native Watercraft Slayer 14.5 (Sand) - His
    2010 Wilderness Systems Tarpon 100 (Mango) - Hers
    ________________________________________________
    Lost Fishing - You know it's where you'd rather be!
  • tarawatarawa Posts: 150 Deckhand
    Great video....thanks for sharing.
    Life Is For Service
  • Mike HodgeMike Hodge Posts: 31 Deckhand
    tarawa wrote: »
    Great video....thanks for sharing.


    One of the biggest issues is pausing long enough on the backcast to let the line fully straighten, so the rod can load. Most people, self included, get tighter and quicker when they have a lot of line out, which is one of the worst things you can do. Make yourself pause on the backcast, THEN go forward.
  • mtd885mtd885 Posts: 1,159 Officer
    Mike Hodge wrote: »
    One of the biggest issues is pausing long enough on the backcast to let the line fully straighten, so the rod can load. Most people, self included, get tighter and quicker when they have a lot of line out, which is one of the worst things you can do. Make yourself pause on the backcast, THEN go forward.

    Geez Mike you brought back a memory I had forgotten....One day I was at the Golden Gate Casting Club practicing early in the AM before anyone got there. I had no confidence and I did not want to embarrass myself in front of all the great casters at the club. I set up at the farthest spot from the club house and I just could not make a decent cast. All of a sudden I hear someone shouting at me from the clubhouse. At first I did not hear what he said then he said it again LOUDER, "WAIT FOR THE BLEEPING (F word) BACKCAST MICHAEL!"...it was Mel. He too did not want to be bothered so he arrived early to practice his spey casting which at the time was a new found pleasure for him. It gave him the chance to be a beginner again, he was euphoric. I gave a friend a little casting advice last week and I channeled Mel, I now understand how good it felt to Mel to help someone along. How do you get to Carnegie Hall? PRACTICE!
  • DogmanDogman Posts: 450 Deckhand
    Mike Hodge wrote: »
    One of the biggest issues is pausing long enough on the backcast to let the line fully straighten, so the rod can load. Most people, self included, get tighter and quicker when they have a lot of line out, which is one of the worst things you can do. Make yourself pause on the backcast, THEN go forward.

    I think that is the issue I am having at the moment. My back casts are very nice but the front cast isn't doing so well. I'm going to head out a bit after work tonight and see if I can time it better. Love the advise here, I know I really appreciate it. I'm sure others do too. Thanks.
    2013 Native Watercraft Slayer 14.5 (Sand) - His
    2010 Wilderness Systems Tarpon 100 (Mango) - Hers
    ________________________________________________
    Lost Fishing - You know it's where you'd rather be!
  • jumboshrimpjumboshrimp Posts: 820 Officer
    Mike Hodge wrote: »
    One of the biggest issues is pausing long enough on the backcast to let the line fully straighten, so the rod can load. Most people, self included, get tighter and quicker when they have a lot of line out, which is one of the worst things you can do. Make yourself pause on the backcast, THEN go forward.

    Definitely one of (if not THE) biggest issues. That pause can be so difficult when youre staring at a fat tailing red lol
  • Ol'DirtyCasterOl'DirtyCaster Posts: 2,259 Captain
    tarawa wrote: »
    I really think that lessons in casting would be the best. I can cast a fly across the canal where I live and have caught bass. This is with a 5wt rod that I purchased after my saltwater outfit. I bought a Sage rod for around $300 and sold the other rod for what I had in it. There is a big difference now, but I am far from accomplished. More practice at the canal and in my yard. A 60' cast would make me happy!
    My original set up was purchased at a fly shop in Stuart Fl. I forget the name though.



    If you can make you way up, I work with alot of guys trying to sharpen up their game, typically free of charge on Sundays (by appt. only). The biggest thing for most guys is just keeping it fun, don't let yourself get discouraged or frustrated. After a couple years casting becomes an afterthought.
  • mtd885mtd885 Posts: 1,159 Officer
    If you can make you way up, I work with alot of guys trying to sharpen up their game, typically free of charge on Sundays (by appt. only). The biggest thing for most guys is just keeping it fun, don't let yourself get discouraged or frustrated. After a couple years casting becomes an afterthought.

    I do not agree with your last sentence. I was one of those that thought that way until I met Brandon Powers from TFO who took me to school one day. I could not believe how magnificent his casts were. He got me into thinking about curve casts to improve my presentations. Lo and behold I now concentrate on how the fly lands on the water which put me back in touch with my mechanics. Last week with the wind blowing lightly I made some presentations that shocked me they were so right on. The casting stroke made me look like I was out of control but the fly did what I wanted it to do. The game changes and like baseball we have to make adjustments.


    My back casts are very nice but the front cast isn't doing so well
    To fix this (using 15' of line) I suggest you stand sideways and watch your back and forward casts keeping the rod tip on the same plane (no dip or rise). Practice different speeds from very fast to slow and learn to feel the line. Most importantly when you are ready to release the line make sure your stop is with authority so the line shoots off the tip of the rod correctly in a v loop.
  • Ol'DirtyCasterOl'DirtyCaster Posts: 2,259 Captain
    mtd885 wrote: »
    I do not agree with your last sentence.


    I'm ok with that.
  • DogmanDogman Posts: 450 Deckhand
    mtd885 wrote: »
    To fix this (using 15' of line) I suggest you stand sideways and watch your back and forward casts keeping the rod tip on the same plane (no dip or rise). Practice different speeds from very fast to slow and learn to feel the line. Most importantly when you are ready to release the line make sure your stop is with authority so the line shoots off the tip of the rod correctly in a v loop.

    I'm not sure what you mean by stand sideways. But I'll try.
    2013 Native Watercraft Slayer 14.5 (Sand) - His
    2010 Wilderness Systems Tarpon 100 (Mango) - Hers
    ________________________________________________
    Lost Fishing - You know it's where you'd rather be!
  • tarawatarawa Posts: 150 Deckhand
    If you can make you way up, I work with alot of guys trying to sharpen up their game, typically free of charge on Sundays (by appt. only). The biggest thing for most guys is just keeping it fun, don't let yourself get discouraged or frustrated. After a couple years casting becomes an afterthought.

    Where are you located? I will be back north (from Homestead in a week or two). I am all for lessons, one on one or group.
    Life Is For Service
  • Ol'DirtyCasterOl'DirtyCaster Posts: 2,259 Captain
    tarawa wrote: »
    Where are you located? I will be back north (from Homestead in a week or two). I am all for lessons, one on one or group.


    I prefer one on one, groups are a distraction. And I'm in Melbourne, contact Rich at HG's in Melbourne about scheduling a day. The number is 723-4751.
  • sparse greysparse grey Posts: 1,748 Captain
    Jumbo Thanks for the video.
    Ron Conner Release the fish, keep the memories. Once a Knight is enough.
  • tarawatarawa Posts: 150 Deckhand
    I will contact you when I am back in town. Thanks!
    Life Is For Service
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