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OK. I Got A Rod/Reel. Now what?

JoshWJoshW Posts: 523 Officer
:huh

I am heading to the famed Big Snowbird Creek in Robbinsville, NC for two weeks. The home I rented is right on a renowned section of BSC that is known for wild Brookies and big Rainbows.

I have read up on the area and bought a 4wt combo with 6x leader and floating line. I will pick up the appropriate Mayfly and Midge patterns when I get to town.

Now how the hell do I fly fish. I am a lifetime angler and have seen a lot of people throw a fly on TV and in person but I have never done it myself. I don't even know what side you reel with or how to set the drag. Much less, what the hell do I do? I will likely get a guide for a day or two but any links or advice would be great.

I think I could get in trouble with this. It kind of reminds me of archery a bit in terms of adding a new dimension to the hunt. Plus, the gear is cool. Why the hell am I more excited to catch a 12" fish than I am to tarpon fish every year? :confused:

Replies

  • Kevin KellyKevin Kelly Posts: 84 Greenhorn
    Go back to the shop where you bought the rod and reel. Someone there will be able to give you some tips on casting. Beyond that, listen to your guide.
  • SpineymanSpineyman Destin, FlPosts: 8,278 Admiral
    It's all in the wrist and the pulling of the line.
    Kayak Rookie...and loving it.
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  • JoshWJoshW Posts: 523 Officer
    Go back to the shop where you bought the rod and reel. Someone there will be able to give you some tips on casting. Beyond that, listen to your guide.

    I bought the Rod/Reel on CL. I didn't want to buy a crappy get up but also didn't want to drop $800 for something I may suck at or never do again. I am looking for a lesson in town before I fish. Any words of wisdom or good websites with info? It seems there is a ton to know.
  • AG.AG. Posts: 5 Greenhorn
    once you get the general concept of loading line and timing, it just takes a lot of practice developing your own cast.


    I have a extra reel with old fly line that i practice in the street with almost every night.
  • saltydancindavesaltydancindave Posts: 1,255 Officer
    There are a few fly shops in Sarasota for casting instruction; CB's, Economy Tackle & Flying Fish Outfitters or http://www.mangrovecoastflyfishers.com/
  • thinfisherthinfisher Posts: 326 Officer
    Basics here at Sexy Loops...no really this is not spam it's a website on everything fly http://www.sexyloops.com/flycasting/5principles.shtml ; also as suggested get to a local shop if you have time before your trip....See Sean at Flying Fish Outfitters and hook up with Dusty Sprague and he'll have you casting in no time. Phone for the shop is 941-412-4512. Good luck and tight lines.
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  • leewanleewan Posts: 16 Greenhorn
    Contact [email][email protected]<[email protected][/email]>; FFF instructor, best $$ you can spend.

    Also contact thru Flying Fish Outfitters
  • FlyflingerFlyflinger Posts: 6 Greenhorn
    For a good reference point for a beginning flyfisher, go to Fly Anglers Online, www.faol.com. They have lots of good advice.
  • FlyflingerFlyflinger Posts: 6 Greenhorn
    Sorry about that, they changed their URL. It's now www.flyanglersonline.com.
  • JoshWJoshW Posts: 523 Officer
    Thanks guys. I am leaving tomorrow for NC so I won't make a private lesson beforehand. I'll grab a few while I'm there. I'll post pics if I actually catch a fish!
  • Jack HexterJack Hexter New Port RicheyPosts: 4,859 Moderator
    Quick and simple, remember you are throwing the line, not the fly. Slow down and wait for the line to unroll and straighten out before starting the next portion of your cast. The back cast is more important than your forward cast because it loads the rod for the forward cast. You don't need to throw the whole line, most fish are hooked within 30'-50'
  • MoondawgMoondawg Posts: 214 Officer
    Quick and simple, remember you are throwing the line, not the fly. Slow down and wait for the line to unroll and straighten out before starting the next portion of your cast. The back cast is more important than your forward cast because it loads the rod for the forward cast. You don't need to throw the whole line, most fish are hooked within 30'-50'

    Jack Hexter has the best advice here and I wish I had seen this thread earlier, sorry.. The back cast is thee most important factor for a good smooth and lengthy cast. I have seen so many people on TV (guides included) that tend to try to throw the line out on the forward cast which simply isn't the case. I grew up in Scotland, (now live in Fl) and I started fly fishing around 8 or 9 years old in remote unspoiled lochs, (lakes) for wild brown trout. Before even heading out on my first trip, I think I spent a few weeks learning to cast (but i was young) prior to anyone wanting to take me. Anyway, here's a few tips for learning for a solid cast before any bad habits set in..

    -As mentioned, it is not in the wrist, your wrist should be locked with thumb on top of your rod.
    -Keep your elbow as close to your body as possible, (for beginners).
    -On the back cast, stop your arm abruptly at the 12 'o' clock position and allow the line to uncoil behind you. You will feel a tug on the rod tip if done correctly.
    -At this point there will be no need to 'try' to throw the line out, let the rod do the work.
    -Gently release the line and let it flow through your fingers (assuming it's on the ground and not coiled in your hand) when the rod tip is about 10 'o' clock and lower the rod as the line is throwing out.

    I have taught quite a lot of people to fly fish and the hardest step for most people is to stop the rod at the 12 'o' clock position. It's a habit that needs to be developed and the best way to get into this habit is to wear a long sleeved shirt (one that doesn't stretch at the cuff) and place the butt of the rod inside your cuff. The eliminates the desire to bring the rod all the way back.

    Now this is information is for the basic fly cast, there are many more including the roll cast, the spey cast (fished on the River Spey many times in Scotland but not bragging:)) the double Spey cast and side casting. Keeping your wrist locked you will find that the rod will do the work as long as your back cast is strong, it's also easier to learn with a forward taper line seeing as most of the weight is at the end where you connect your leader. I hope this helps.

    Thanks,
    Glenn.
    Just 'cause the sun don't shine, doesn't mean you can't go fishin'..
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  • saltydancindavesaltydancindave Posts: 1,255 Officer
    You might go out to one of the smaller beaches & try casting into the gulf. With any luck another flyfisher will walk by & give some tips for casting.
  • MistermtdMistermtd Steinhatchee Posts: 76 Greenhorn
    If your going trout fishing definitely spend the time/$$ to get an hour's worth of instruction. Trout fishing is often nymphing and that frequenlty involves multi-hook setups drifting through a spot where fish are holding. Depending on water depth, these leaders can easliy be 10 -12 feet long and trout are very leader shy so light tippets are very common. These rigs are VERY easy to foul and often you're cutting it apart and retying, a 5 - 10 minute process each time you screw it up. You often don't need to throw a long way but it DOES help if you can throw a controlled open loop that will keep your setup clear of itself when fishing a 3 fly drift.

    Trout fishing is its own thing and jumping a 5# bow and then chasing him down a free stone stream to protect #6 tippet is every bit the mental challenge of landing a tarpon.
  • JoshWJoshW Posts: 523 Officer
    I won't get lessons until Tuesday but I have been fishing. There are at least 200 Rainbow Trout schooled up in a deep hole in the river behind my cabin. A few are 26"+. I have tried every freakin fly on Earth. I have tried nymphs and terrestrials too. I am using a 4wt with floating line and a 6x leader. My presentation is decent. I am fishing upstream mostly and drifting dry flies back to me. These things will WEAR OUT floating commercial pellets. My kids have tried floating Berkeley Trout pellets, GULP crawlers, sinking flies with small spoons, etc...

    Not one bite. I am determined. Keep you posted.
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