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Am I the only one that's noticed?

spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 2,799 Captain
Non-protected birds...
There will never be a really free and enlightened state until the state comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived.

Replies

  • H20dadH20dad Posts: 3,130 Captain
    Everything has to be super duper spelled out these days. 
  • H20dadH20dad Posts: 3,130 Captain
    edited July 12 #3
    Why aren’t monk parakeets (which can cause a lot of damage to power supplies with their nesting) not on that list?  

    And purple swamphens?

    Muscove ducks?
  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 2,799 Captain
    edited July 12 #4
    Ah, see. That's one of my discussion points lol Is it only the birds listed? Or is it any non-protected birds? I'm interpreting it as the later.
    New brochure changes guys:
    Bag and possession limits
    Non-protected birds (African and Eurasian collared-doves, common pigeon, Egyptian goose, house sparrow, and common starling) – No bag limits
    There will never be a really free and enlightened state until the state comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived.
  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 2,799 Captain
    Also, can anyone tell me how to tell the difference between a collared dove and mourning dove in flight?  Or am I shooting them off telephone wires? :D
    There will never be a really free and enlightened state until the state comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived.
  • H20dadH20dad Posts: 3,130 Captain
    spangler said:
    Also, can anyone tell me how to tell the difference between a collared dove and mourning dove in flight?  Or am I shooting them off telephone wires? :D
    They are 2-3x bigger. Have you not seen the two?  Are you literally an anti hunter that tries to help the anti hunting fwc with insanely stupid arguments?
  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 2,799 Captain
    edited July 12 #7
    Let me super duper spell it out for you..
    I believe ALL non protected birds are game per this regulation. You know just like an anti
    oh also from wikipedia:
    Mourning dove: The mourning dove is a medium-sized, slender dove approximately 31 cm (12 in) in length. Mourning doves weigh 112–170 g (4.0–6.0 oz),
    Eurasian collared dove: an average length of 32 cm (13 in)[14] from tip of beak to tip of tail, with a wingspan of 47–55 cm (19–22 in), and a weight of 125–240 g (4.4–8.5 oz)
    African collared dove: typically around 26 cm (10 in) in length (weight not provided)
    Of course we all know you aren't that bright. Or have any idea what goes on in florida hunting per your frequent misstatements and bs
    There will never be a really free and enlightened state until the state comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived.
  • H20dadH20dad Posts: 3,130 Captain
    spangler said:
    Let me super duper spell it out for you..
    I believe ALL non protected birds are game per this regulation. 
    You believe.  I see a list of species.  Is there a specific reason you state this?  Legal wording in another document? It isn't worded, as an example, "birds not listed under the migratory treaty act as updated 2020."  but has a list of birds that could be assumed to include only.

    https://www.ecfr.gov/current/title-50/chapter-I/subchapter-B/part-10/subpart-B/section-10.13

    on this list purple swamp hen is listed, but grey headed are not. mute swan also not listed. some species as listed by the fwc as invasive are also on the migratory treaty list and not listed as game species federally.  This is a lot of semantics and legal manure, however it leaves the discretion in the field up to a ton of questions about which list.  Now, I expect this level or mealy mouthed professionalism from the Tallahassee rules crew, but I'm not getting into or even risking an argument in the field with law enforcement, who I have no problem with and have never had a problem.  Give me a list of what I can and can't shoot and I will do as opportunity provides.  Make it ambiguous and you have by your actions excluded me from participation in said opportunities.

    Then fwc states things such as this in the rule changes section

    https://myfwc.com/hunting/regulations/proposed-rules/
    • Nonprotected birds – update to include African and Eurasian collared-doves, common pigeon (rock dove), and Egyptian goose; and change “English sparrow” to “house sparrow” and “starling” to “common starling” to match currently accepted common names.

    updated to include.....what does that mean?  You have a list other than the example I provided above that includes species of birds?  Why not just have a list and say here it is....?


    spangler said:

    Mourning dove: The mourning dove is a medium-sized, slender dove approximately 31 cm (12 in) in length. Mourning doves weigh 112–170 g (4.0–6.0 oz),
    Eurasian collared dove: an average length of 32 cm (13 in)[14] from tip of beak to tip of tail, with a wingspan of 47–55 cm (19–22 in), and a weight of 125–240 g (4.4–8.5 oz)
    African collared dove: typically around 26 cm (10 in) in length (weight not provided)
    Of course we all know you aren't that bright. Or have any idea what goes on in florida hunting per your frequent misstatements and bs
    I think you missed my sarcasm related to my long running complaints about the purple swamp hen and past arguments it couldn't be hunted because it looked too much like purple gallinules. 



    purple swamp hen
    Grey- headed swamphens are chicken- sized waterfowl with the males averaging 1,050 g (2.3 lbs) and females averaging 850 g (1.9 lbs). 



    purple gallunule
    MEASUREMENTS
    • Both Sexes
      • Length: 13.0-14.6 in (33-37 cm)
      • Weight: 7.2-10.3 oz (203-291 g)
      • Wingspan: 21.6-22.1 in (55-56 cm
  • gogittumgogittum Nature CoastPosts: 3,491 Captain
    In NM I had plenty of both in my yard frequently and didn't see any great difference in size.  On the ground the collar was distinct.  In the air, not so much. Don't like either of them....flying rats, 1st cousin to pigeons.  The Diana pellet gun did a fine job.
  • AlwaysLearningMoreAlwaysLearningMore Posts: 215 Deckhand
    The collared doves I see in SW FL are a little bigger than whitewings, and they appear to me to be almost double the body mass of mourning doves.  They look quite different than mourning doves in flight.  Slower wingbeats and less erratic flight.  And aside from the size difference, they have a different profile showing a fuller more round breast.  But I don't often see collared doves in the same areas where I hunt mourning doves since the collared doves around here usually hang around more urban areas.


  • H20dadH20dad Posts: 3,130 Captain
    The collared doves I see in SW FL are a little bigger than whitewings, and they appear to me to be almost double the body mass of mourning doves.  They look quite different than mourning doves in flight.  Slower wingbeats and less erratic flight.  And aside from the size difference, they have a different profile showing a fuller more round breast.  But I don't often see collared doves in the same areas where I hunt mourning doves since the collared doves around here usually hang around more urban areas.


    You now realize you will not be asked to sit at the cool table…..
  • JohnnyBanditJohnnyBandit Posts: 660 Officer
    H20dad said:
    Why aren’t monk parakeets (which can cause a lot of damage to power supplies with their nesting) not on that list?  

    And purple swamphens?

    Muscove ducks?

    Kill all the monk parakeets.. For all I care..

    But Purple swamphens?????

    Given your special gift of MISIDENTIFYING  wildlife.....

    Do you happen to be speaking of this species??



  • Big MakBig Mak Posts: 5,428 Admiral
    No,  he means these...
  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 2,799 Captain
    @AlwaysLearningMore, thanks.  That was useful feedback.  Slower wing beat, less erratic flight, rounder profile.  Not sure I'm good enough to distinguish but gives me something to start looking for.
    I think you're right though.  Not sure I see them out in the woods.  But def see them around the house.
    There will never be a really free and enlightened state until the state comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived.
  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 2,799 Captain
    Swamphens is really why I started the thread.  Figured some would welcome the new reg.  This place has gotten real boring...
    There will never be a really free and enlightened state until the state comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived.
  • JohnnyBanditJohnnyBandit Posts: 660 Officer
    Big Mak said:
    No,  he means these...
    I forgot about the African ones....

  • Big MakBig Mak Posts: 5,428 Admiral
    There are plenty to shoot on Okeechobee and a few spots in the glades. 
  • JohnnyBanditJohnnyBandit Posts: 660 Officer
    Big Mak said:
    There are plenty to shoot on Okeechobee and a few spots in the glades. 

    I have seen them... But I seldom see them west of Lake O.....

    I see the Purple Gallinules often...... 

    When I was a kid folks called both the purple and common Gallinules Marsh Hens or swamp hens.

    And some folks ate them....

    So when I saw Purple Swamphen.... The first bird that came to mind was the Purple Gallinule

    I forgot all about the invasive African ones.... Out of sight... Out of Mind I suppose...

    It is a real shame to think about the invasive species we have here in Florida.....

    I have neighbors that did not realize that the Quakers and Nandays etc were not native...
  • H20dadH20dad Posts: 3,130 Captain
    Big Mak said:
    There are plenty to shoot on Okeechobee and a few spots in the glades. 
    If the fwc will tell me in writing “we will not ticket or harass you about shooting the grey headed swamphen” then the bombing range will sound like markum park shooting range for at least one day. Just from me. 

    Lead shot too…..
  • Big MakBig Mak Posts: 5,428 Admiral
    Quite honestly they need to get a handle on them before they get out of hand like the other invasive. 
  • H20dadH20dad Posts: 3,130 Captain
    Big Mak said:
    Quite honestly they need to get a handle on them before they get out of hand like the other invasive. 
    It’s so far gone, they are way up north now. 
  • OGBOHICAOGBOHICA floridaPosts: 813 Officer
    Big Mak said:
    Quite honestly they need to get a handle on them before they get out of hand like the other invasive. 
    theyre out of control on some places already
  • H20dadH20dad Posts: 3,130 Captain
    https://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/profiles/birds/waterfowl/grey-headed-swamphen/

    At the bottom of the pages here you can see the map where they have been observed in Florida. 

    This is a screen shot. 


  • Sonnyboy16Sonnyboy16 Gainesville, FLPosts: 113 Deckhand
    Go Gata's. Invasive species (aquatic, avian and more) have been in FL for way more than 50 years. The FWC does not care at all....
  • H20dadH20dad Posts: 3,130 Captain
    edited July 27 #25
    Go Gata's. Invasive species (aquatic, avian and more) have been in FL for way more than 50 years. The FWC does not care at all....
    They care. They keep everyone from killing them. 
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