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Spinner sharks

Gr8LakerGr8Laker Bev Hills / Pine RidgePosts: 63 Deckhand
I had my first experience with spinner sharks today...what a show! I hooked a few but one in particular made as least 5 big jumps spinning faster than I ever imagined. King macks chasing bait out of the water right next to the boat, sharks, a small gag, and baitfish (looked like Spanish sardines) so thick I got a false bottom reading. Very calm seas, too.

All in all a great day on the water.

Replies

  • DeboDebo Posts: 67 Deckhand
    Sounds like a fun day. Whether I am catching fish or not I always enjoy seeing lots of activity like fish, sharks and rays jumping out of the water chasing bait. 
  • capt louiecapt louie citrus countyPosts: 10,771 Moderator
    Thanks for the report. Spinners are tough to land with all the acrobatics. 
    "You'll get your weather"
  • xmuskyguidexmuskyguide Beautiful HomosassaPosts: 1,967 Captain
    Spinners are spectacular and fun to catch. Blacktips also make some incredible jumps and are very fast. 
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Gr8LakerGr8Laker Bev Hills / Pine RidgePosts: 63 Deckhand
    After all the jumping and spinning I was amazed that the shark was still on.Good braid (10 lb Power Pro) and not a bad job of playing the fish while clearing lines and driving the boat (if I do say so myself, which I do).
  • Gr8LakerGr8Laker Bev Hills / Pine RidgePosts: 63 Deckhand
    Spinners are spectacular and fun to catch. Blacktips also make some incredible jumps and are very fast. 

    I've been told that blacktips are good eating. Any special handling involved?
  • xmuskyguidexmuskyguide Beautiful HomosassaPosts: 1,967 Captain
    Yes, gut them and let them bleed out, then on the ice asap. When cleaning, be sure and remove ALL of the dark meat. I like to grill shark steaks and just baste with melted butter and lemon juice. They are delicious. 
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Gr8LakerGr8Laker Bev Hills / Pine RidgePosts: 63 Deckhand
    Sounds easy enough. Just gotta keep from getting my fingers bit off!

    Thanks!
  • jmac7469jmac7469 Posts: 173 Deckhand
    Joe does a great description of the way we prep sharks.
  • ANUMBER1ANUMBER1 Posts: 12,738 AG
    take out the urea vein before icing, located in the top of the stomach cavity, thin clear membrane that runs from **** forward.
    Make a light slice down both sides and use your finger to strip it out, this is where the ammonia smell comes from
    I am glad to only be a bird hunter with bird dogs...being a shooter or dog handler or whatever other niche exists to separate appears to generate far too much about which to worry.
  • Doc StressorDoc Stressor Homosassa, FLPosts: 2,777 Captain
    That vein is the kidney.  It does contain a lot of urea, which breaks down to ammonia after the fish dies. But the meat itself contains urea that breaks down to ammonia as well.  That's because sharks use urea in their blood to help maintain osmotic balance with seawater.  They are what are known as osmoconformers.  These organisms prevent water from flowing into or out of their bodies by having the same concentration of solutes in their blood as is found in seawater.  Sharks and rays are unique in using urea for this purpose. 

    Sharks need to be bled and chilled quickly to prevent ammonia formation, giving the meat a sour flavor. You can get rid of this taste by marinating the meat in just about any liquid such as salted water or milk and discarding the liquid which will contain most of the ammonia. Or you can just tell yourself that you put lemon on the fish.  ;) 
  • Gr8LakerGr8Laker Bev Hills / Pine RidgePosts: 63 Deckhand
    Thanks...great info!
  • ANUMBER1ANUMBER1 Posts: 12,738 AG
    That vein is the kidney.  It does contain a lot of urea, which breaks down to ammonia after the fish dies. But the meat itself contains urea that breaks down to ammonia as well.  That's because sharks use urea in their blood to help maintain osmotic balance with seawater.  They are what are known as osmoconformers.  These organisms prevent water from flowing into or out of their bodies by having the same concentration of solutes in their blood as is found in seawater.  Sharks and rays are unique in using urea for this purpose. 

    Sharks need to be bled and chilled quickly to prevent ammonia formation, giving the meat a sour flavor. You can get rid of this taste by marinating the meat in just about any liquid such as salted water or milk and discarding the liquid which will contain most of the ammonia. Or you can just tell yourself that you put lemon on the fish.  ;) 
    thank you Doc for the explanation that I couldn't remember...  lol
    I am glad to only be a bird hunter with bird dogs...being a shooter or dog handler or whatever other niche exists to separate appears to generate far too much about which to worry.
  • xmuskyguidexmuskyguide Beautiful HomosassaPosts: 1,967 Captain
    shark p, shrimp do do, trout worms. Why be finicky?
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • ANUMBER1ANUMBER1 Posts: 12,738 AG
    ammonia isn't all that it's cracked up to be.
    I am glad to only be a bird hunter with bird dogs...being a shooter or dog handler or whatever other niche exists to separate appears to generate far too much about which to worry.
  • capt louiecapt louie citrus countyPosts: 10,771 Moderator
    Doesn't a soak in ice water with some vinegar or lemon neutralize the urea .
    I used to marinate in italian dressing before putting over the coals. Was good 
    "You'll get your weather"
  • Doc StressorDoc Stressor Homosassa, FLPosts: 2,777 Captain
    Leave out the vinegar.  It will "neutralize" the ammonia. But it forms a salt (ammonium acetate) that is used as a food additive in some countries.  However, it's impossible to get the correct ratio of vinegar (acetic acid) to get things balanced.  The result is typically too much vinegar which can pickle the meat and give it a sour flavor.  Ammonia gives the meat a bitter flavor that is similar to lemon. It's best to leach it out with any type of marinade or a neutral solution like milk.  Saltwater, either natural or made up, will also do the job. Soaking in freshwater changes the texture of the meat and causes it to lose flavor. 
  • ANUMBER1ANUMBER1 Posts: 12,738 AG
    I commercial fished shark, logged and cut out the waste tube, then salt/ice brine before packing.
    small operation, mostly 500 lbs or so per night and mainly sold for food, fins were a bonus.
    I am glad to only be a bird hunter with bird dogs...being a shooter or dog handler or whatever other niche exists to separate appears to generate far too much about which to worry.
  • Crkr23Crkr23 MelrosePosts: 376 Deckhand
    I wish you would get busy and get rid of a few more tons of them, they are a PITA.
  • xmuskyguidexmuskyguide Beautiful HomosassaPosts: 1,967 Captain
    Like buzzards that clean up a lot of road kill, sharks serve a useful purpose too. 
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Crkr23Crkr23 MelrosePosts: 376 Deckhand
    Yes, feeding crabs.
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