Home West Central General Fishing & The Outdoors

100-120' 9-29-21

Went in search of bait the day before our trip.  Tossed the net at the pier and got about 100 white baits in the well with another 1,000 stuck in the net.  Spent the next 1/2 hour picking them out.  Ugh.  Tossed pinfish traps.  Nothing but crabs and catfish.  I'm really struggling trying to find pins since the red tide.  Sabikied up 20 or so big threads at the skyway.  

Set off at dawn with sea searcher and a couple of my neighbors.  Hit a channel marker and sabikied up some sardines and what I initially thought were blue runners.  Not blue runners.  That had some yellow on them and some prickly fins.  They got the job done, though.

Headed out to the Mexican Pride wreck.  This was one of the first offshore numbers I got when I moved here but never fished it.  Loaded with barracuda.  We hooked a few jacks and some things that were too big for our tackle.  Lost a few to the cudas.

Roger got this rainbow runner.  I've never seen one before.  Pretty fish.



We got tired of this so we went exploring.  Checked out several numbers in the area that I had never fished.  Got a decent show at one spot so we stopped.  Picked up a couple mangs and some ARS.  Nothing great.  We saw a little activity and some birds about 1/4 mile away. Then the flat line went off.  TUNA!!!  

We decided to make a short run to the pipe to finish the day.  Immediately got into some decent mangos.  I looked back to see the flat line bait running for its life.  Rod bent over and I started reeling it in.  I saw pretty quickly it was a mang with another one following it (I thought).  We got it in the net but noticed the other one appeared to be hooked too so I handlined it in.  

Turned out one of them had the hook in its mouth but the other one had somehow gotten the braid tangled up in its mouth.  2 for the price of one!!




The bite slowed down but Roger proceeded to school us on the art of snapper fishing.  He just kept catching them while we sucked.  He got a very large ARS and this nice mango.



All in all a fun day.  



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Replies

  • Reel-LuckyReel-Lucky Oldsmar, FLPosts: 3,377 Moderator
    BOGO Mangos, that's amazing. Good stuff, Burch.
  • CaptainBlyCaptainBly Posts: 2,587 Captain
    Nice job burch.  Was starting to get worried about you guys when you weren't back.  My boat is in the shop but will hopefully be back tomorrow.  Jonesing for some fishing...
    In Loving Memory of James Zielske, January 19, 1957-July 5, 2013
  • SeaSearcherSeaSearcher west FlPosts: 175 Deckhand
    Thanks again for the invite Burch, nice trip and everything worked to boot! :).  Glad we got that tuna as it was something we were targeting. 

    Just fwi for whoever is interested.  I tried a new braid on this trip and absolutely love it! It's so smooth it feels like mono(10lb braid), the 30lb is extremely smooth too, barely feel it if running between fingernails.  Think it's relatively new on the market and is sold at various outlets, check out the specs on it.. IMO well worth the cost.  I used PP for the last 8 years and this stuff blows it out of the water(no pun intended).  If interested there are Youtube videos and reviews online. Just passing along info and my opinion of it, not paid in anyway, not an ad, I actually just bought it off Amazon. Got the white so I could see/watch it. 

    KastKing KastPro 13X Finesse Braid.
  • clarosaclarosa Posts: 858 Officer
    Nice looking mangozers there!
    SnappaSlappa jigs, Made By Fisherman FOR fisherman

    https://snappaslappa.com/collections/jigs
  • releasegearreleasegear Posts: 863 Officer
    really nice mangos!!
    bornoffshore-sig.jpg

    Mike Wilhite - Fisherman/President

    Born Offshore Gear
    www.bornoffshore.com

    'Performance Fishing Apparel'
  • NitzeyNitzey Posts: 242 Deckhand
    Those fish with yellow on them and prickly fins might be leatherjacket fish.  If so, be very careful.  I have been stung by them and it is very painful and the pain long lasting.  
  • bigfinn35bigfinn35 Sarasota/VenicePosts: 950 Officer
    Where's there a leatherjacket in this post? You talking about the rainbow runner?
    Paddle faster, I hear banjo music.
  • Kokosing LoverKokosing Lover Posts: 1,088 Officer
    bigfinn35 said:
    Where's there a leatherjacket in this post? You talking about the rainbow runner?
    OP mentioned some baits that they picked up on the way offshore that matched the descriptions of either leatherjackets or atlantic bumper.  It's alright; Nitzey isn't pulling a "Chunkster".
  • hook_emhook_em Posts: 237 Deckhand
    I'm not sure if they were leatherjackets or not.  A while back I posted a pic of what was identified here as a leatherjacket and these weren't the same.  I was sure they were little blue runners until I looked a little closer.  Definitely had a yellow tint.  They did have prickly fins like a pinfish, though.  I handled them all day and didn't get stung.
  • SeaSearcherSeaSearcher west FlPosts: 175 Deckhand
    edited October 4 #11
    They pretty much looked like 3-4" jack crevalle/bluerunner mix.  Had a sharp spine on back, a little yellow on them..  Ran in schools of 50-100. Guessing some kind of jack.

    Definitely were not leatherjackets. 

    Just looked around on internet, thinking they may have been horse eyed jacks, closest I've seen. 

    Horse-eye Jack Caranx Latus  Fishdex
  • Kokosing LoverKokosing Lover Posts: 1,088 Officer
    We don't see a lot of horse eyed jacks in our area; they tend to be found a little farther south of us.  But, with schools of juveniles, especially towards the end of the warm season, all bets are off as far as north/south distributions.  That's why we find juvenile bonefish here in Tampa Bay with some frequency.

    If I were a betting man, which I am not, I would put my money on the mystery bait being Atlantic Bumper, Chloroscombrus chrysurus.  They match the size range, presence of yellow and should be close in body shape to what was described.

    Next time, TAKE A PICTURE!  I can ID them 99% of the time from a good profile picture, and then we don't have to suffer through the inevitable clever [email protected] who thinks it's funny to call everything a "warsaw".
  • hook_emhook_em Posts: 237 Deckhand
    This is as close as I can find out there.  White Trevally?

  • Kokosing LoverKokosing Lover Posts: 1,088 Officer
    The white trevally is "not from around here".  But if that's the body shape we're looking for, then the Rough Scad Trachurus lathami is the most likely culprit.  Fairly common in our area and make terrific bait.  Close relative to the $100/dozen Goggle Eyes that they love so much on the east coast.
  • bigfinn35bigfinn35 Sarasota/VenicePosts: 950 Officer
    bigfinn35 said:
    Where's there a leatherjacket in this post? You talking about the rainbow runner?
    OP mentioned some baits that they picked up on the way offshore that matched the descriptions of either leatherjackets or atlantic bumper.  It's alright; Nitzey isn't pulling a "Chunkster".
    My bad, guess that's what I get for skimming the post.
    Paddle faster, I hear banjo music.
  • clarosaclarosa Posts: 858 Officer
    edited October 5 #16
    The white trevally is "not from around here".  But if that's the body shape we're looking for, then the Rough Scad Trachurus lathami is the most likely culprit.  Fairly common in our area and make terrific bait.  Close relative to the $100/dozen Goggle Eyes that they love so much on the east coast.
    Ahhhh ye olde rough scad critter pops up again. I got into them a couple years ago. I don't remember them having yellow tails though. Looked just like goggle eyes, just not quite as big of eyes. 
    Here's a couple pics of the rough scad as identified by Will
    SnappaSlappa jigs, Made By Fisherman FOR fisherman

    https://snappaslappa.com/collections/jigs
  • hook_emhook_em Posts: 237 Deckhand
    Definitely not that.  Not  as thin.  Maybe baby amberjack?


  • clarosaclarosa Posts: 858 Officer
    I'm thinking banded rudder fish possibly as well.
    SnappaSlappa jigs, Made By Fisherman FOR fisherman

    https://snappaslappa.com/collections/jigs
  • hook_emhook_em Posts: 237 Deckhand
    Definitely could be that.


  • SeaSearcherSeaSearcher west FlPosts: 175 Deckhand
    We'll just have to take a pic next time.. like these, my favorite catches while catching bait. 

  • Kokosing LoverKokosing Lover Posts: 1,088 Officer
    We'll just have to take a pic next time.. like these, my favorite catches while catching bait. 

    If you hold that red grouper closer to the camera, you can make it look at least 10 pounds.  Spotfin jawfish are awesome to have in an aquarium, so long as you don't mind the substrate being constantly shifted throughout the entire tank.
  • SeaSearcherSeaSearcher west FlPosts: 175 Deckhand
    If you hold that red grouper closer to the camera, you can make it look at least 10 pounds.  Spotfin jawfish are awesome to have in an aquarium, so long as you don't mind the substrate being constantly shifted throughout the entire tank.
    Wish the pic of the red grouper had turned out better, the colors on it were amazing, even on the fins, it was lit up for sure.  I bet that burrowing jawfish does move some material around with that bucket mouth.
  • Kokosing LoverKokosing Lover Posts: 1,088 Officer
    The juvenile red grouper can be flat out beautiful.  My personal theory on the difference between the colors on the adults vs. the juveniles is that the juveniles tend to be in 30' or less, where the more vibrant colors still show up, so they morph colors to match.  The juveniles also tend to hang out in areas with a lot more encrusting corals and sponges, which tend to have vibrant reds and oranges.  The big red grouper live in depths where it all just looks blue, and the adults tend towards areas with more sand and dead rock.

    I've seen a jawfish move all of the sand from one half of a 55 gallon tank and pile every last grain of it in the other half overnight.  A lot of the burrowing marine life (fish, crabs, shrimp) tend to be obsessive compulsive about moving substrate around.
  • bigfinn35bigfinn35 Sarasota/VenicePosts: 950 Officer
    That tracks with what I've seen. Seems like RG lose a lot of their brighter patterns and striped appearance when they reach close to keeper size.
    Paddle faster, I hear banjo music.
  • NitzeyNitzey Posts: 242 Deckhand
    For some reason some creatures that live at extreme depths often are red in color.  For example Royal Red Shrimp, and queen snapper.  Red snapper, vermillion snapper, hogfish and red grouper are deep, but not that deep
  • bigfinn35bigfinn35 Sarasota/VenicePosts: 950 Officer
    edited October 10 #26
    Nitzey said:
    For some reason some creatures that live at extreme depths often are red in color.  For example Royal Red Shrimp, and queen snapper.  Red snapper, vermillion snapper, hogfish and red grouper are deep, but not that deep
    That's because red is impossible to see in relatively deep water most of the time. As sunlight gets refracted and diffused by water, certain colors go away the deeper you get, going from low to high wavelength on the EM spectrum. Red disappears at around 15 ft deep if you don't have any additional light shining on something, so lots of bottom-dwelling fish in deep water are red since it makes them harder to see. If we bring our own lights down there though, the color is fully visible.
    Paddle faster, I hear banjo music.
  • Jack HexterJack Hexter New Port RicheyPosts: 5,312 Moderator
    bigfinn35 said:

    That's because red is impossible to see in relatively deep water most of the time. As sunlight gets refracted and diffused by water, certain colors go away the deeper you get, going from low to high wavelength on the EM spectrum. Red disappears at around 15 ft deep if you don't have any additional light shining on something, so lots of bottom-dwelling fish in deep water are red since it makes them harder to see. If we bring our own lights down there though, the color is fully visible.
    Red doesn't actually disappear, the color red goes away and the object that is red turns to black as the light diffuses and the object gets deeper

  • bigfinn35bigfinn35 Sarasota/VenicePosts: 950 Officer
    bigfinn35 said:

    That's because red is impossible to see in relatively deep water most of the time. As sunlight gets refracted and diffused by water, certain colors go away the deeper you get, going from low to high wavelength on the EM spectrum. Red disappears at around 15 ft deep if you don't have any additional light shining on something, so lots of bottom-dwelling fish in deep water are red since it makes them harder to see. If we bring our own lights down there though, the color is fully visible.
    Red doesn't actually disappear, the color red goes away and the object that is red turns to black as the light diffuses and the object gets deeper

    yup- like I said if we shine an artificial light on something down there it'll look red.
    Paddle faster, I hear banjo music.
  • clarosaclarosa Posts: 858 Officer
    I know when I spearfish red blood actually turns dark green after a certain depth. 
    SnappaSlappa jigs, Made By Fisherman FOR fisherman

    https://snappaslappa.com/collections/jigs
  • NitzeyNitzey Posts: 242 Deckhand
    Great, thanks for the scientific explanations.  Anyone care to comment on what color lures or jigs we should use for deeper waters?
  • bigfinn35bigfinn35 Sarasota/VenicePosts: 950 Officer
    Nitzey said:
    Great, thanks for the scientific explanations.  Anyone care to comment on what color lures or jigs we should use for deeper waters?
    Depends how deep you're talking. Serious vertical jigging guys often use dark purple or shiny black and solver jigs if they're in 500-800' from what I've seen. In my opinion, jigging in the offshore waters most people in our area fish (30-130' or so) doesn't depend on color so much as the jig's action and flashiness, but I'm sure someone with more knowledge than me can weigh in on that. The same phenomenon with red disappearing goes for other colors- orange, yellow, and green are also pretty much gone without artificial light at 80 ft deep. I tend to use a lot of blue/silver and chartreuse jigs for slow pitch or speed jigging, and almost always use white for bucktails.
    Paddle faster, I hear banjo music.
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