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9/11. 90 feet NW of Clearwater

The guys from the hunting club wanted mangoes so we ran more north than I usually go.
The bite was good, also picked up some grouper. Nice over cast day not too hot.
Lost an engine a mile outside the pass🙁

Replies

  • Reel-LuckyReel-Lucky Oldsmar, FLPosts: 3,365 Moderator
    Northwest pays off, a better Gag bite up that way for sure. Stud Mang, great trip.
    Hate losing a motor, lost a coil 30 out a couple weeks ago, long chug in.
  • fla crackerfla cracker Posts: 160 Deckhand
    Nice job on the mangos, Guy?  Bummer about the motor!
  • drgibbydrgibby Posts: 1,756 Captain
    Thanks John.
    Motor is still under warranty, thank goodness!!!
  • releasegearreleasegear Posts: 854 Officer
    nice work !
    bornoffshore-sig.jpg

    Mike Wilhite - Fisherman/President

    Born Offshore Gear
    www.bornoffshore.com

    'Performance Fishing Apparel'
  • HookedUp330HookedUp330 Tarpon Springs, FL.Posts: 36 Deckhand
    Nice work. For the life of me I can't find any mangs offshore. 
  • harbisonharbison Posts: 5,182 Admiral
    Looking good!   
    Fished off Clearwater 50 years ago. Good to see fishing there is still going strong. 
  • bigfinn35bigfinn35 Sarasota/VenicePosts: 910 Officer
    edited September 14 #8
    Nice work. For the life of me I can't find any mangs offshore. 
    Plenty of people here way more qualified than me to educate you on this fishery, but I'll share what I can. They're almost always around any structure where you can target gag grouper. Ledges, rockpiles, artificial reefs and wrecks are all viable areas. They're just way more wary and prone to line shyness than the rest of the bottom crowd. Anchor upcurrent of where you want to fish by a bit, and start chumming heavily. Making a mix of your own with sand/oats/fish oil/jack mackerel/ground fish/any number of things works great, but I usually use a couple finely ground chum bags and use some heavy bait scissors to chop frozen baits into thumbnail-sized chunks. Frozen glass minnows are awesome too. Once the slick is going, start throwing baits back into the chum on long and light leaders (I use about 8 feet of 25-lb fluoro) and a jighead. Size can range from 1/8 oz to 3/4 oz or heavier, depending on current, depth, and type of bait. Smaller live pinfish, sardine chunks or plugs, live or dead whitebait, and live shrimp can all work. Just have the bail open and let the bait sink down slowly through your chum trail. Wait for a bite, usually just indicated by the line going out way faster, give it a second, then come tight and set the hook. If you're on a wreck or similar structure, get em up fast to avoid the goliaths. 

    Clarosa (maker of some excellent snapper jigheads) or one of the others on this forum might chime in if I missed something big or got something wrong. When I started doing this instead of just bottom fishing, I started pulling loads of mangs off of spots I'd fished for years without catching any good numbers of them. 
    Paddle faster, I hear banjo music.
  • clarosaclarosa Posts: 845 Officer

    bigfinn35 said:
    Nice work. For the life of me I can't find any mangs offshore. 
    Plenty of people here way more qualified than me to educate you on this fishery, but I'll share what I can. They're almost always around any structure where you can target gag grouper. Ledges, rockpiles, artificial reefs and wrecks are all viable areas. They're just way more wary and prone to line shyness than the rest of the bottom crowd. Anchor upcurrent of where you want to fish by a bit, and start chumming heavily. Making a mix of your own with sand/oats/fish oil/jack mackerel/ground fish/any number of things works great, but I usually use a couple finely ground chum bags and use some heavy bait scissors to chop frozen baits into thumbnail-sized chunks. Frozen glass minnows are awesome too. Once the slick is going, start throwing baits back into the chum on long and light leaders (I use about 8 feet of 25-lb fluoro) and a jighead. Size can range from 1/8 oz to 3/4 oz or heavier, depending on current, depth, and type of bait. Smaller live pinfish, sardine chunks or plugs, live or dead whitebait, and live shrimp can all work. Just have the bail open and let the bait sink down slowly through your chum trail. Wait for a bite, usually just indicated by the line going out way faster, give it a second, then come tight and set the hook. If you're on a wreck or similar structure, get em up fast to avoid the goliaths. 

    Clarosa (maker of some excellent snapper jigheads) or one of the others on this forum might chime in if I missed something big or got something wrong. When I started doing this instead of just bottom fishing, I started pulling loads of mangs off of spots I'd fished for years without catching any good numbers of them. 
    Looks like you ran up by my way. Got some good looking groceries there. That mang is a slob! You pretty much summed it up man. Go to your favorite Gag ledge and look for a wavy show a few feet off the bottom. If you see that, those are most likely Snapper.
    SnappaSlappa jigs, Made By Fisherman FOR fisherman

    https://snappaslappa.com/collections/jigs
  • Kokosing LoverKokosing Lover Posts: 1,068 Officer
    Nice work. For the life of me I can't find any mangs offshore. 
    Chances are, you HAVE found the mangroves, but you haven't gotten them to bite.  There are times when even the best of the mangrove fishermen (and I'm **** good at that game) can't get the little buggers to bite, and if your technique and tackle selection are off you'll only get them to bite when they are acting crazy (which does happen).  I drop GoPros on most spots after I fish them, just to ground truth what is down there.  I also keep a log of everything we catch at every spot.  When I cross reference the catch log to the GoPro video, it's not uncommon for the bottom to be covered in fish that we failed to get to bite.  Sometimes they're just not in the mood or they want things just a certain way and we didn't try that method because we didn't think they were down there because we weren't catching any of them.  This happens most often with mangroves and gags (yellowtail incresingly).  I've fished spots many a time and not gotten a hint of a gag bite, and then watched GoPro of that trip and seen a half dozen keeper gags just sitting there staring at the camera.  If you are having trouble catching a certain fish and you think you're not finding them, I HIGHLY suggest getting a GoPro (or whatever brand) and dropping it down on the spots you fish.  Then you will know for certain if the problem is location or technique (or just a bad bite).

    The truth is, almost every spot in our area that is holding any kind of bottom fish (gags, grunts, red grouper, lane snapper, vermillions or red snapper) will have at least a few mangroves mixed in there; they are that omnipresent because they are super adaptable and flexible in their habits and feeding.  But when you have other aggressive/moronic fish (red grouper, red snapper, lane snapper, vermillion snapper), your bait is going to be toast long before a mangrove is willing to sample it.  The trick is finding a spot that has 20 or more mangroves on it, at which point they displace the other "lesser" snappers; those are going to be the nice ledges and rock piles with lots of exposed rock and preferably enough relief to have a school of small bait suspending over the top of the structure.  Mangroves LOVE to have a school of 2" fish over the structure, whether it's small cigar minnows of juvenile grunts, doesn't matter so long as it's the right size and bunched up over the structure.
  • bigfinn35bigfinn35 Sarasota/VenicePosts: 910 Officer
    Nice work. For the life of me I can't find any mangs offshore. 
    Chances are, you HAVE found the mangroves, but you haven't gotten them to bite.  There are times when even the best of the mangrove fishermen (and I'm **** good at that game) can't get the little buggers to bite, and if your technique and tackle selection are off you'll only get them to bite when they are acting crazy (which does happen).  I drop GoPros on most spots after I fish them, just to ground truth what is down there.  I also keep a log of everything we catch at every spot.  When I cross reference the catch log to the GoPro video, it's not uncommon for the bottom to be covered in fish that we failed to get to bite.  Sometimes they're just not in the mood or they want things just a certain way and we didn't try that method because we didn't think they were down there because we weren't catching any of them.  This happens most often with mangroves and gags (yellowtail incresingly).  I've fished spots many a time and not gotten a hint of a gag bite, and then watched GoPro of that trip and seen a half dozen keeper gags just sitting there staring at the camera.  If you are having trouble catching a certain fish and you think you're not finding them, I HIGHLY suggest getting a GoPro (or whatever brand) and dropping it down on the spots you fish.  Then you will know for certain if the problem is location or technique (or just a bad bite).

    The truth is, almost every spot in our area that is holding any kind of bottom fish (gags, grunts, red grouper, lane snapper, vermillions or red snapper) will have at least a few mangroves mixed in there; they are that omnipresent because they are super adaptable and flexible in their habits and feeding.  But when you have other aggressive/moronic fish (red grouper, red snapper, lane snapper, vermillion snapper), your bait is going to be toast long before a mangrove is willing to sample it.  The trick is finding a spot that has 20 or more mangroves on it, at which point they displace the other "lesser" snappers; those are going to be the nice ledges and rock piles with lots of exposed rock and preferably enough relief to have a school of small bait suspending over the top of the structure.  Mangroves LOVE to have a school of 2" fish over the structure, whether it's small cigar minnows of juvenile grunts, doesn't matter so long as it's the right size and bunched up over the structure.
    Really cool to have this breakdown. Always knew that the higher relief spots were better for mangs generally, but the relief = suspended bait really helps make the connection to why that is. Great info.
    Paddle faster, I hear banjo music.
  • NitzeyNitzey Posts: 232 Deckhand
    bigfinn35 said:
    Nice work. For the life of me I can't find any mangs offshore. 
    Plenty of people here way more qualified than me to educate you on this fishery, but I'll share what I can. They're almost always around any structure where you can target gag grouper. Ledges, rockpiles, artificial reefs and wrecks are all viable areas. They're just way more wary and prone to line shyness than the rest of the bottom crowd. Anchor upcurrent of where you want to fish by a bit, and start chumming heavily. Making a mix of your own with sand/oats/fish oil/jack mackerel/ground fish/any number of things works great, but I usually use a couple finely ground chum bags and use some heavy bait scissors to chop frozen baits into thumbnail-sized chunks. Frozen glass minnows are awesome too. Once the slick is going, start throwing baits back into the chum on long and light leaders (I use about 8 feet of 25-lb fluoro) and a jighead. Size can range from 1/8 oz to 3/4 oz or heavier, depending on current, depth, and type of bait. Smaller live pinfish, sardine chunks or plugs, live or dead whitebait, and live shrimp can all work. Just have the bail open and let the bait sink down slowly through your chum trail. Wait for a bite, usually just indicated by the line going out way faster, give it a second, then come tight and set the hook. If you're on a wreck or similar structure, get em up fast to avoid the goliaths. 

    Clarosa (maker of some excellent snapper jigheads) or one of the others on this forum might chime in if I missed something big or got something wrong. When I started doing this instead of just bottom fishing, I started pulling loads of mangs off of spots I'd fished for years without catching any good numbers of them. 
    A friend said they bite more readily at night.  I have never tried it myself.
  • clarosaclarosa Posts: 845 Officer
    Nitzey said:

    A friend said they bite more readily at night.  I have never tried it myself.
    Sometimes...I honestly will do best either at daybreak or nearing sunset they will fire off. There will usually be a lull at night then once the moon comes up they will fire back off. 
    SnappaSlappa jigs, Made By Fisherman FOR fisherman

    https://snappaslappa.com/collections/jigs
  • Phins_360Phins_360 FLPosts: 11 Deckhand
    Nice work. For the life of me I can't find any mangs offshore. 
    Chances are, you HAVE found the mangroves, but you haven't gotten them to bite.  There are times when even the best of the mangrove fishermen (and I'm **** good at that game) can't get the little buggers to bite, and if your technique and tackle selection are off you'll only get them to bite when they are acting crazy (which does happen).  I drop GoPros on most spots after I fish them, just to ground truth what is down there.  I also keep a log of everything we catch at every spot.  When I cross reference the catch log to the GoPro video, it's not uncommon for the bottom to be covered in fish that we failed to get to bite.  Sometimes they're just not in the mood or they want things just a certain way and we didn't try that method because we didn't think they were down there because we weren't catching any of them.  This happens most often with mangroves and gags (yellowtail incresingly).  I've fished spots many a time and not gotten a hint of a gag bite, and then watched GoPro of that trip and seen a half dozen keeper gags just sitting there staring at the camera.  If you are having trouble catching a certain fish and you think you're not finding them, I HIGHLY suggest getting a GoPro (or whatever brand) and dropping it down on the spots you fish.  Then you will know for certain if the problem is location or technique (or just a bad bite).

    The truth is, almost every spot in our area that is holding any kind of bottom fish (gags, grunts, red grouper, lane snapper, vermillions or red snapper) will have at least a few mangroves mixed in there; they are that omnipresent because they are super adaptable and flexible in their habits and feeding.  But when you have other aggressive/moronic fish (red grouper, red snapper, lane snapper, vermillion snapper), your bait is going to be toast long before a mangrove is willing to sample it.  The trick is finding a spot that has 20 or more mangroves on it, at which point they displace the other "lesser" snappers; those are going to be the nice ledges and rock piles with lots of exposed rock and preferably enough relief to have a school of small bait suspending over the top of the structure.  Mangroves LOVE to have a school of 2" fish over the structure, whether it's small cigar minnows of juvenile grunts, doesn't matter so long as it's the right size and bunched up over the structure.

    Great post Will

    Hope your back is doing better.

    Since we lost RG and perhaps gags and lanes.  The deep drop trip is looking better and better and I hope your back is improved.  If not we'll strap you on the fighting chair with one of the big electrics and you can winch up BLT and snowies all day :)

    Boat goes in the yard on the 23rd.  Got the new AC already for install.  So after about a week or so of yard work at Embree we should have her good to go.

    I am really jonesing for a deep water overnight trip.

    I'll text you later.

    Take care.
  • HookedUp330HookedUp330 Tarpon Springs, FL.Posts: 36 Deckhand
    Thank you everyone for the tips. 
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