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Bailless reel free lining

Cabowabo72Cabowabo72 Long Boat KeyPosts: 34 Deckhand
I recently switched to using a bailess reel and when free lining and getting a good hit. I have alot of trouble getting the line back onto the roller in a manner that doesn't affect the bite. Most of the time I ain't quick enough to get it on the roller causing the line to tighten thus the fish drops the bait alot. 

The best way I've managed to work it out is by raising the rod tip quickly and lowering it. Creating enough slack for just long enough to where placing it on the line roller doesn't allow the fish to feel anything and am to come tight like normal.

Has anyone found out a good way to get your line back onto the roller while it ripping out. I have the most trouble with kings and tarpon that run like hell after smoking a bait. Snook if you feel the gulp and have the time to get it onto the roller quick enough. 

Replies

  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 4,687 Captain
    When free-lining only strip off about thee feet at a time then immediately put the line back under the roller until it starts to come tight - then repeat, time after time.  That way when you get bit you’re already in gear...
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • TheSuperApeTheSuperApe Posts: 38 Deckhand
    What type of fish are you targeting? Are you holding your line off the roller so you can dump it for a king mackerel bite or just for sensitivity?

    But the way you described with popping the rod up fo create slack is what i do. And if you need to get it off the roller with tension dip the rod down quickly to create slack to pop it off the roller.
  • louislouis Posts: 76 Deckhand
    Pretty much what The Super Ape said.  I use a vintage 706z and a 704z converted to manual pickup.  You can start to get a feel for it by having someone stand about 20 feet fro  you with line in their hand while you hold line on finger tip have them put some tension on the line tell them to go (start moving away) simulating a strike, then release  from your finger have them moving quickly practice picking up line again moving it toward the spool while turning the handle to facilitate the pickup. It will take some practice but eventually you will master.
  • wahoo1900wahoo1900 Hillsboro InletPosts: 47 Deckhand
    I had this issue today, was using a bailless reel and a 5ft barracuda picked up my live bait and went flying so fast.  No chance I was getting the line back on the roller, got a nice cut from the braid too.
  • poncedoradoponcedorado Posts: 767 Officer
    thinking outside the box here, but what about a little tool, I'm thinking it would look similar to a baitfish dehooker-  small metal or plastic hook to grab the line and loop it over the roller when you're ready? Smooth material to reduce friction and not damage the line, also save cutting your fingers 
  • louislouis Posts: 76 Deckhand
    You will get a cut or two.  Part of the learning curve.  Have caught everything from bonito, kings to sails.  I am i guess a purist no braid for me.  Still got a few cuts and white stripe burns on finger.  Even after years of using manuals still occasionally get a nick.
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 4,687 Captain
    Over the years I’ve had many spinners with manual rollers - and they work like a dream...  That said I’d never hand one of my customers one since the take some learning...

    Trying to free line with one in places with big kings, wahoo, tuna or other hot Pelagics does require what I suggested.

    That’s okay though... my kids don’t listen to me either...
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • Cabowabo72Cabowabo72 Long Boat KeyPosts: 34 Deckhand
    Thanks for the feedback. I use a penn 704 thats outfitted for tarpon and kings. Just the right line capacity and drag needed for 50lb braid while in the surf or on a bridge. 

    The idea of putting the line back onto the roller after every few feet is a good idea however when the bait gets chased. If you don't have enough slack In the line and its on the roller the bait looks un realistic if its get flipped over while trying to escape.

    Lenny if you see this any thoughts or anyone else? 


  • Ol'DirtyCasterOl'DirtyCaster Posts: 2,422 Captain

      I've owned a few bailless reels over the years, but the whole point of them was the fast pickup on the drop when plug fishing. I abandoned them the first time I found a reel with a manual close bail (saltiga Z4500). I just don't see the benefit of a bailless design for what you're doing. 
  • Cabowabo72Cabowabo72 Long Boat KeyPosts: 34 Deckhand

      I've owned a few bailless reels over the years, but the whole point of them was the fast pickup on the drop when plug fishing. I abandoned them the first time I found a reel with a manual close bail (saltiga Z4500). I just don't see the benefit of a bailless design for what you're doing. 



    I agree
  • TheSuperApeTheSuperApe Posts: 38 Deckhand
    edited May 2021 #12

      I've owned a few bailless reels over the years, but the whole point of them was the fast pickup on the drop when plug fishing. I abandoned them the first time I found a reel with a manual close bail (saltiga Z4500). I just don't see the benefit of a bailless design for what you're doing. 
    I find that opening and closing the bail multuple times each cast while freelining to be tiresome (mentally). Much easier to lust lift off and place line on the roller when freelining baits. 
  • swampdogswampdog Central FloridaPosts: 4,134 Captain
    Never owned or know anything about a bail less reel. Respectfully asking, what’s the benefit of using them? I do manually close my bails after each cast and some folks ask why I do that. 
  • Cabowabo72Cabowabo72 Long Boat KeyPosts: 34 Deckhand
    swampdog said:
    Never owned or know anything about a bail less reel. Respectfully asking, what’s the benefit of using them? I do manually close my bails after each cast and some folks ask why I do that. 

    When throwing heavy plugs/jigs/swimbaits having a bailless reel assures the bail never accidently closes during a cast and loosing whatever your throwing. Reels today are very very good at preventing the issue with stronger bail system designs but it occasionally still occurs.  In addition many people like the ease of removing the line on and off the roller without having to flip a bail each time. Its all preference
  • swampdogswampdog Central FloridaPosts: 4,134 Captain
    Thanks cabowabo. 
  • CaptJCaptJ Posts: 1,653 Captain
    Although all my reels have bails I close them manually when a strike occurs as the type of fish I chase are hard running on the bite and the bail will sometimes get knocked back open and refuse to close. Result is usually a lost fish. I don't understand the advantage of a reel with no bail. It's a finger saver.
  • Tony RomaTony Roma Posts: 2,755 Captain
    Just watched a video on the subject and I to see no advantage. And truthfully it confuses the hell out of me. 
  • Cabowabo72Cabowabo72 Long Boat KeyPosts: 34 Deckhand
    Tony Roma said:
    Just watched a video on the subject and I to see no advantage. And truthfully it confuses the hell out of me. 
    To be very specific its two things one is a proven point and the second is preference: 1. Its one less mechanical part to fail during usage or a hard fought battle being the bail system and spring is removed with bailess.. 2. Not having your plugs going to the next continent when casting heavy plugs-1ounce plus- if your bail happens to close during a cast when your whipping it.
  • Tony RomaTony Roma Posts: 2,755 Captain
    That all makes perfect sense, like most people change is scary to me;)
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 4,687 Captain
    Something i forgot to mention earlier... there was a second reason that club members and other skilled anglers went to manual rollers - all those years ago... The bails that came with almost every spinner in the seventies simply didn't work very well.  The part that didn't work was the line roller that froze up if you ever fished the reel in saltwater.... Those manual rollers solved that problem, rolling free no matter how heavy the pressure from a hard fighting fish (and if you were hooked up on a 10 to 1, or even 20 to 1 fish that was very important to keep that mono line in good shape during a long fight).

    Here's one of many I had back then - the actual roller was a Garcia Mitchell part - the roller arm was machined by local teacher Herman Voss - and this reel is still ready to fish more than forty years later.... 


    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • Cabowabo72Cabowabo72 Long Boat KeyPosts: 34 Deckhand
    Something i forgot to mention earlier... there was a second reason that club members and other skilled anglers went to manual rollers - all those years ago... The bails that came with almost every spinner in the seventies simply didn't work very well.  The part that didn't work was the line roller that froze up if you ever fished the reel in saltwater.... Those manual rollers solved that problem, rolling free no matter how heavy the pressure from a hard fighting fish (and if you were hooked up on a 10 to 1, or even 20 to 1 fish that was very important to keep that mono line in good shape during a long fight).

    Here's one of many I had back then - the actual roller was a Garcia Mitchell part - the roller arm was machined by local teacher Herman Voss - and this reel is still ready to fish more than forty years later.... 


    These are practically the only 2 reels I fish. Although I don't own a fishing boat so I only fish in the surf. These have caught 1000s of fish and were passed down to me. 

  • Cabowabo72Cabowabo72 Long Boat KeyPosts: 34 Deckhand
    The purple reel is a 710 and still requires a mitchell roller. That is a specially machine arm and roller designed in a mitchell fashion. 
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