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Dramamine during charter?

greyreefsharkgreyreefshark Posts: 534 Officer
I can’t go on deep sea charters because I’ve gotten pretty darn sick on those before.

But tomorrow I’m goin on a Tarpon charter in Government Cut Inlet in Miami. Is something I should take Dramamine for? And if so, is the Non Drowsy version effective?

Thanks guys!
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Replies

  • GeneakersGeneakers West Palm BeachPosts: 263 Deckhand
    Wife used to get nasty sea sick.. her Dr told her to take a dram the nt before, and then take half a one the next morning with her coffee / half at lunch.. She gets a good night sleep, and it i sin her system b4 we get to the ramp.  Works like a champ.  She still carries some "essential oil" that is supposed to help if she she starts to get a lil lump in her gizzard
  • RStyleRStyle Posts: 1,513 Captain
    I always did as Geneakers wife...... but with Meclizine. I added Pepcid to settle my stomach.
    I think starting the night before is critical
  • greyreefsharkgreyreefshark Posts: 534 Officer
    Thanks so much to you both!
  • Jack HexterJack Hexter New Port RicheyPosts: 5,160 Moderator
    Dramanine may be good for some, but I've found the Scopolamine Patch is the most effective preventative aid.  Problem is dry mouth and it needs a Rx to obtain
  • cortrcortr Posts: 357 Deckhand
    Bonine is less drowsy version of Dramamine. Agree with Rstyle that it is better to start the night before and take another dose a couple of hours before charter the next morning. 
  • tankeredtankered Gainesvill, FlPosts: 736 Officer
    I don't get seasick but to answer one of your questions....YES.

    Government cut, like all the inlets on the east coast, is generally going to be sloppier than the surrounding waters. 
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 14,579 AG
    Art's got a pretty foolproof method of dealing w seasickness IIRC 
    Yesterday's memories are not today's reality
  • Terry RavenscraftTerry Ravenscraft Posts: 217 Deckhand
    Ive seen the wrist bands work like magic for some people not so good for others ...a lot easier to prevent than to comeback.
  • 1FSM1FSM Posts: 141 Deckhand
    I've noticed Bonine works better than others with fewer/milder side effects than other motion sickness meds.
    As others have posted it works best when you start taking them the night before the trip.
     
  • AC ManAC Man Posts: 6,783 Admiral
    I've never been seasick a day in my life and thank it's Mind Over Matter. I will say did I was in as sportfisher looking out from the cabin did the deck and seeing it rocking back and forth have felt a little something but I walked out onto the back deck and it went away. This is my point I've seen people get seasick tied up at the dock at the intercoastal to go on a charter boat and the other half get seasick going out the intercoastal give me a freaking break. Worst case is what I took an employee 70 miles offshore in the second I stopped he laid in the floor convulsing saying please take me home please guy turned around after never even dropping a line burn 150 gallons of fuel. LOL
  • tagtag Posts: 8,986 Admiral
    Or don’t take anything so you’ll get free chum
  • GeneakersGeneakers West Palm BeachPosts: 263 Deckhand
    edited April 8 #13
    I don't get sea sick.. BUT.. I went out on a salmon charter head boat one time off the W coast of WA state when I was in the military, back in the 80's.. we got there late and was so excited to get 2 of the last open rod holders .. RIGHT UP ON THE BOW.. WINNING!!..  we headed out in the dark, an hour or so to get to open water and are told it's going to "be a little bumpy today".  Guy that went with me had spent most the night b4 in the bar and ate old pizza and sardines in tomato sauce for breakfast..  that dad gum boat was bucking and rolling and tossing.. I went out on deck to get some air, cpl folks already looking green in the face.  We finally got to where the "fleet of charters" were set up and catching fish and Bob and I headed to the bow.. lines in the water, boat pitching left, then right, then would shoot up so quick it would buckle your knees,, could see boats EVERYWHERE, next second the boat would fall so fast you literally felt weightless.. hit the bottom, boat rolls left / right and all you can see is what looks like 2 stories of water all around us.. we are in a bowl and you can't see another boat.. knees buckle and this d a m n thing is rocketing upwards again... can see for miles, boats everywhere,, rolls left, rolls rt, and freefall again for a second or 2..  this went on for an hour, guys all down the sides of the boat are getting ill, and I smell this gawd awefull putrid stench of death and dog sheet,, I turn around and Bob has fell during one of the boats convulsive moves, and he is laying in this orange'ish foam of a mess with half chewed up sardines, spoiled beer,  and chunks of pizza... I tried like helz to maintain my guts and the next guy over sees Bob and he starts spewing like a shaken coke bottle, comin our of his nose, mouth, eyes, ears..  1st mate comes by and is trying to hose this mess off the deck, but Bob can't get his footing between the bucking of this death trap we are on and his own slimy mess his has been rolling in for the last 3 minutes. Again he starts spewing like crazy, the guy beside him is playing the puke duet with him... I finally lost it as well and commenced to blowing chunks over the rail.

    That lasted for about an hour.,, fortunately the guys on the stern of the boat were yanking them in left and right.  1st mate comes by again and said "get your friend up we have boat limit and are heading back in".. I  was SOOOO happy when that boat headed east..  We got back to the dock, collected our 2 each salmon that someone else had caught, and I made Bob strip to his skivvies, rinse his dumb **** off, throw his puke soaked clothes in a garbage bag in the trunk, and ride back to post in his underwear.. 

    So.. no, I don't get sea sick either... but I do have compassion, because I know how absolutely awful it feels when your innards starts knock on your gizzard and ALL you can think about is getting OFF THIS D.A.M.N BOAT!
  • 1FSM1FSM Posts: 141 Deckhand
    Some people are immune to motion/sea sickness but it's rare...my uncle is one of them.
    My uncle was on a destroyer in the navy back in the early 60's when they were sent out of port in Philippines as a typhoon arrived.  I think he said they were out on seas with over 40' waves for two days and only person who didn't get sea sick was him and a older officer...everybody else including the captain eventually got sick.        

  • poncedoradoponcedorado Posts: 388 Deckhand
    Never had it myself but I wonder where's the line for what type of vessel people will typically get seasick on? For example nobody gets seasick on a surfboard or inner tube playing at the beach, even though the wave motion is similar. I don't think people get seasick on a jet ski either.

    It's odd that there's some size/type of vessel that starts to trick the mind and inner ear into thinking you shouldn't be moving even though you are. At least I think that's how it works

    when we've had people out that started to feel it coming on, one thing that helped was to have them drive for a while. It distracted them and made them pay attention to the upcoming waves and behavior of the boat, which helped their eyes & brain match up to the movement they were feeling
  • GeneakersGeneakers West Palm BeachPosts: 263 Deckhand
    Never had it myself but I wonder where's the line for what type of vessel people will typically get seasick on? For example nobody gets seasick on a surfboard or inner tube playing at the beach, even though the wave motion is similar. I don't think people get seasick on a jet ski either.

    It's odd that there's some size/type of vessel that starts to trick the mind and inner ear into thinking you shouldn't be moving even though you are. At least I think that's how it works

    when we've had people out that started to feel it coming on, one thing that helped was to have them drive for a while. It distracted them and made them pay attention to the upcoming waves and behavior of the boat, which helped their eyes & brain match up to the movement they were feeling
    I agree 100%... get em busy, get them doing something to take their mind off that rolling feeling that starts in their stomach... get em closer to shore where their eyes can focus on the horizon, get em on the open deck where they can get clean air and not breathing exhaust fumes.. 2 stroke smoke stinks,,. but diesel rolling over the back of a sport fisher or head boat will get my stomach rolling QUICK (and give me a dad gum headache)..  keep em out of the cuddy or enclosed spaces.... and have been told more than once to carry lemon slices and have em suck on a slice if they start feelin a little queasy.

    Usually if someone on the boat starts getting the bubble guts I will have em go up and sit on the chase on the bow.. get the bow up / somewhat underway, the side to side rocking stops, and the cool air in their face will help em settle down some.
  • tankeredtankered Gainesvill, FlPosts: 736 Officer
    If you can convince them to go for a swim that can work wonders too. 

    Funny, the rocking of a boat can actually make me sleepy.

    I love napping down below on the run between spots, as long as it's not so rough to beat me up. 
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 14,579 AG
    I won't get seasick if i'm driving the boat, which i always am.  Not sure if i would if i wasn't though.   Maybe if the wife was driving
    Yesterday's memories are not today's reality
  • AC ManAC Man Posts: 6,783 Admiral
    I've never had anyone gets seasick under power at speed heading offshore. Once you stop to bottom fish and the boat starts rocking side to side that's when it all starts. And the bigger boats seem to be worse because you have more role side to side
  • AC ManAC Man Posts: 6,783 Admiral
    Those fishermen on the West Coast of the United States towards the North have a completely different set of rules on when is a good day for fishing. When I was in the Keys with the family we try to Charter trip the weather didn't seem that bad to me but the mate said you'd be better off if we tied you to a post hit you with a fire hose and beat you so we didn't go. 
  • conchydongconchydong Pompano BeachPosts: 8,850 Admiral
    edited April 8 #21
    I don’t get seasick but I have gotten sick at sea after drinking a bottle of cheap rum.   I remember leaving Oban Scotland heading to the Hebrides with 25 foot seas on a car ferry ship and 3/4 of people were running around with puke bags and I was sitting in the bar with a few old Scottish salts eating kidney pies and drinking beer. They were impressed  as they called me a yank being immune to the conditions even though I’m not a Yankee. Some think all Americans are Yankees.

    “Everyone behaves badly--given the chance.”
    ― Ernest Hemingway

  • AC ManAC Man Posts: 6,783 Admiral
    I don’t get seasick but I have gotten sick at sea after drinking a bottle of cheap rum.   I remember leaving Oban Scotland heading to the Hebrides with 25 foot seas on a car ferry ship and 3/4 of people were running around with puke bags and I was sitting in the bar with a few old Scottish salts eating kidney pies and drinking beer. They were impressed  as they called me a yank being immune to the conditions even though I’m not a Yankee. Some think all Americans are Yankees.
    As I have said before I think a little alcohol on the water helps with seasickness. Not enough to make you drunk and puke I'm talking about just enough to take your mind off of the situation I've seen it a thousand times it works
  • tarpon41tarpon41 Posts: 271 Deckhand
    I get sea sick...if it's blue water  gulf stream rollers and waves 6 feet or moreon top...then it's is old formula dram amine...one tablet when I get up then one tablet leaving dock...then one more at 1or 2pm if its get plus 6...for me old formula puts me sleepy  but it keeps me fishing...but no booze during trip...under 6 feet and chop in the Sea of Cortez Baja it is  Bonnine/generic   Meclizine HCI 25 mg. one as soon as up before light breakfast one leaving dock one may be mid day...get the chewable kind ...ok now at times I'll take one before breakfast wait on the other if it's getting rougher I'll take another when I first feel it's starting... for me Meclizine in chewable form gets it to you immediately...it's the main drug for those incurring a Meuniere's middle ear episode
  • tarpon41tarpon41 Posts: 271 Deckhand
    The no booze with dramamine was not... it lessons the effectiveness but it's likely to cause you to pass out
  • restlessnativerestlessnative Posts: 2,536 Captain
    I’m lucky I’ve never gotten sea sick, and I’ve taken a sportfish from Florida to Costa Rica twice on its own hull and all around the Caribbean and been in 25’ waves. I’ve definitely been nervous a couple times caught in bad storms though. 
  • scallopscallop Posts: 36 Deckhand
    As others have said the scope patch is great.  My wife and daughter get seasick very easy, I do on occasion.  Since we have gotten scripts for the patch and started wearing them zero issues with sea sickness.  Have been in all kinds of sea conditions from mild to 10' plus seas in Cozumel.
  • greyreefsharkgreyreefshark Posts: 534 Officer
    Well not sure if I needed it or not. I just took the Dramamine Less Drowsy the night before, and then again in the morning. I only know that I didn’t feel sick at all. So thats cool. 

    That patch sounds like something cool. If I try deep water someday I’ll give it a try. 

    Thanks for all your help guys!
  • tankeredtankered Gainesvill, FlPosts: 736 Officer
    Well....how was the fishing??
  • gogittumgogittum SW New MexicoPosts: 1,569 Captain
    Never sick myself but went on many, many dive charters in all kinds of weather and saw many whose day was ruined by seasickness.  It must be wretched.  What seemed to help the most was to get them on the upper deck and have them look at the horizon.  Seems to stabilize the middle ear some.  Putting them down in the cabin just about guaranteed sickness.

    I've also seen where a shot of booze helped calm some one's tummy.  Theory is that it anesthetizes the Vagus nerve to the stomach.  That's an iffy cure tho'.
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 14,579 AG
    throw em overboard for a few minutes.    
    Yesterday's memories are not today's reality
  • tankeredtankered Gainesvill, FlPosts: 736 Officer
    Exactly. Get them in the water. I mean....it was a dive charter, right?

    And upper deck seems wrong to me, the further you are from the waterline the more exaggerated the motion becomes. 

    In the stern, head up, no laying down seems to be the best you can do for them, but then they're in the way. And sometimes there's just no hope for them.

    Never had a trip cut short but we came real close one time, fortunately we had a friend out there whose wife was a medic and had the anti-nausea suppositories aboard his boat, that's right, suppositories. Thank God she came aboard and shoved the thing up his rear, we weren't going to do it. Worked like a charm though and basically saved our trip, wasn't even that rough but this guy was in real bad shape, pretty much from the time we stopped to catch live bait. 
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