Home Diver's Corner

Spearfishing wahoo or mahi?

dontezumadontezuma Posts: 274 Deckhand
One of my goals this year (2021) is to spear some pelagics.  I'm out of JAX, so it'll be a long haul.  Anyone have any experience to share that might help a brother out?  My expectation is to freedive (really, just snorkel), since taking a tank down for pelagics seems counterproductive, but I'm happy to be wrong.  

Anyone use flashers?  Do they work?  How deep?  So many questions...

Also, anyone in the St. Augustine/Jax area who might want to buddy up, let's talk.  Alton, I already know you're in. :wink:

Replies

  • John McKroidJohn McKroid Posts: 2,361 Captain
    look on youtube, there is a diver in the keys that puts out some pretty good videos -- good luck.
  • dontezumadontezuma Posts: 274 Deckhand
    Yeah, I've seen a fair number of channels, but it's mostly hero stuff, which is fun to watch, but it's not terribly instructional, and for me up in NE FL, things like "just head a mile offshore to the 800' water and reach in and grab one" isn't particularly relevant. LOL.  
  • The Cat's EyeThe Cat's Eye Posts: 1,499 Officer
    edited December 2020 #4

    5-6 years ago a DIY story was published on making and using flashers to attract Wahoo for fishing with rod and reel. I have forgotten if the article was in Fla Sportsman or Sport Fishing magazine. I was bored so I spent over $120 and built a set of beautiful flashers, but have yet to use them. The article was written by two anglers that claimed they work great. The article provided photo's of their set of flashers and Wahoo landed. They fished offshore of either N. Broward County or Palm Beach County. .

    To give you an idea of the size of my non metallic flashers the bottom weight is a foot plus in length and is filled with lead. I used prismatic tape in four colors on flexible material (Don’t remember the type of material as I experimented with several different types but its probable PVC) and encased the flashers in very thick clear waterproof tape. The flashers are suspended from a float and hang close to the water’s surface near the boat. Chum is also used. The flashers are tethered to a vertical copper colored cable by snap swivels. Each flasher is leadered with wire cable and spaced about 18 inches apart or more so they do not tangle with each other. Wire is recommended do to the possibility of a toothy fish hitting one of the flashers or the main line. They are designed to flutter in the current as the boat drifts slowly along. That is the purpose of using light non metallic material that will suspend, flutter and flash. The reason my cost was so high i had to buy the prismatic tape in bulk (four colors) to get the size i needed. I have enough tape left over to make three more sets of these. LOL   



    Giimoozaabi
  • gogittumgogittum SW New MexicoPosts: 1,164 Officer
    They look a lot like the flashers (Herring Dodgers) they use for Salmon in the Northwest.  They're available in a multitude of colors, shapes and sizes, too.  Gibbs in Canada is prob'ly the biggest supplier, but there are a lot of smaller, specialty suppliers, too.

    I can sure see how they'd work for predatory fish.  Makes sense....I just didn't like messing with them.
  • John McKroidJohn McKroid Posts: 2,361 Captain

    5-6 years ago a DIY story was published on making and using flashers to attract Wahoo for fishing with rod and reel. I have forgotten if the article was in Fla Sportsman or Sport Fishing magazine. I was bored so I spent over $120 and built a set of beautiful flashers, but have yet to use them. The article was written by two anglers that claimed they work great. The article provided photo's of their set of flashers and Wahoo landed. They fished offshore of either N. Broward County or Palm Beach County. .

    To give you an idea of the size of my non metallic flashers the bottom weight is a foot plus in length and is filled with lead. I used prismatic tape in four colors on flexible material (Don’t remember the type of material as I experimented with several different types but its probable PVC) and encased the flashers in very thick clear waterproof tape. The flashers are suspended from a float and hang close to the water’s surface near the boat. Chum is also used. The flashers are tethered to a vertical copper colored cable by snap swivels. Each flasher is leadered with wire cable and spaced about 18 inches apart or more so they do not tangle with each other. Wire is recommended do to the possibility of a toothy fish hitting one of the flashers or the main line. They are designed to flutter in the current as the boat drifts slowly along. That is the purpose of using light non metallic material that will suspend, flutter and flash. The reason my cost was so high i had to buy the prismatic tape in bulk (four colors) to get the size i needed. I have enough tape left over to make three more sets of these. LOL   



    Very interesting.  I would like to have read that story.
  • The Cat's EyeThe Cat's Eye Posts: 1,499 Officer
    edited December 2020 #7
    The large 11 inch plastic herring dodgers i have seen online might work very well since they are light and might suspend from a drifting boat but their price at $15 each would equal my flasher's cost but would be a time saver for sure. 
    Giimoozaabi
  • osprey11osprey11 Posts: 1,290 Officer
    My last time diving jax.  Was on my safety stop in 135'   Saw what I thought was a king in distance about 50' away.   I had a big grouper that was trying to float me and gun was unloaded.  Was a curious wahoo.  I am sure I looked funny.  That sucker came within 5' of me.   Belined right t6o me.   Was pretty cool.   


  • dontezumadontezuma Posts: 274 Deckhand
  • watergatorwatergator Fort Pierce Posts: 170 Deckhand
    edited January 12 #10
    Yes to the flashers. I like them to be around 15-20ft long and put the bottom about 20ft above the end of your visibility. Some people like to drop them down until they can barely see the bottom flasher but I feel like fish may come check it out from below and you’d never see them. 

    You can chum if the sharks aren’t too bad. I like to chum when I can because it brings in other fish (jacks, triggers, snappers, etc) in which keeps things interesting and can interest other fish. Doing this last year off jupiter I drew a mutton up to 60ft in 180ft. You can also have someone with a smaller gun shoot those triggers and stuff. That commotion can sometimes draw something else in and you can make dinner since it’s not uncommon to strike out when you really commit to bluewater. 

    I can’t really help with where for you since I haven’t been out of Jax much. Probably recommend going out to 130+ and drifting. Focus your time around ledges/drop offs, humps, or even wrecks to bump you odds. Most of all though, spend time out there. It’s some of the most boring diving until it’s not, so you’ve got to stay ready for that opportunity when it comes. 
  • dontezumadontezuma Posts: 274 Deckhand
    That's awesome info @watergator !  Thanks...
  • minion890minion890 new yorkPosts: 6 Deckhand
    Your article is great, I have read many articles but I am really impressed with your writing style. I will review this post.

    mapquest directions


Sign In or Register to comment.