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Osprey. Loud, squawky survivors

Almost pushed to the edge of existence,the Osprey have really made a rebound in the last decade. I drive across the Indian river every day to and from work, and there are few days that I don't count at least 20. When construction was active here 5 years ago or so, the plight of nesting areas had been brought forth, forcing those building on established nesting areas to provide alternate nest boxes. I can't believe what a difference this has made. The Osprey are everywhere! I do live in a town that is surrounded by the Indian River, and they have made themselves at home, nesting even along main thoroughfares such as U.S.1, which for us, living in a small town, is the main drag. Traffic does not seem to bother them in the least, nor the constant running of mass transit. What used to be a chance opportunity to see them has now become the norm, but to see them in their natural habitat, the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge is my go to, as I live but minutes from my utopia.
This time of year is when the Skimmers show up, along with the White Pelicans, Spoonbills and the plethora of ducks. The Eagles have returned, as have the Harriers. Adding pressure to the Red Tails and Red Shoulder Hawks for territory, where they normally don't have to share. The ground hunters, such as the Bobcats are seeing the beginning of a struggle with the quietly increased number of Coyotes.
I know the survival cycle is ever changing, and so many elements are integral to keeping things in balance. What appears to be tranquil as I traverse the areas, when I stop and see it happening, my first thought is chaotic.
But through it all, they are able to compensate and continue on.
If only humans could do the same..................
Enough of that. :)

The Osprey are not the greatest fisherman, believe it or not, On average, it takes 6 or 7 attempts before they get their meal.

They are not afraid to fish on top of someone else, either. Kinda like rock fishing at Sebastian. Lol.

 The sex is easily told, if you have the view. The male will have a pure white chest, while the female has a spattering of freckles across her chest, or a necklace if you will. This girl was looking to see if I perhaps was hiding fish. As is the rule, if a pair are together, she will be the larger of the two.


It gives me pause to know that we are surrounded, yet don't see. Try to take time and really give your senses the opportunity to become a part of your environment.
Go shoot some images!!!








Suz


Capybara's are vicious and should not be let alone with small children. In-laws are another matter.............

Replies

  • gogittumgogittum SW New MexicoPosts: 2,007 Captain
    Nice shots and hard to get.  You have a knack for being in the right place at the right time.  Here's my contribution to the "Successful Osprey," tho' the goggle eyed girl wasn't too happy about my interest......  This was in 1/09 in Blythe, CA.  If you want Ospreys, go to Guerrero ****, Mexico in Baja California Sur.  They have a program of nesting boxes on poles out in the salt flats.  Lotsa Ospreys, but sounds like you have plenty there.


  • redsgurlredsgurl Posts: 610 Officer
    She does not look entirely pleased with you at that moment. Lol. She is lovely tho. Look how golden that catfish is! I would love to see the salt flats recreationally and the area surrounding them. 
    Suz


    Capybara's are vicious and should not be let alone with small children. In-laws are another matter.............
  • John McKroidJohn McKroid Posts: 3,234 Captain
    edited November 2020 #4
    Beautiful photos!  There have been a few times when an Osprey has snatched a mullet out of the canal behind my house.  Unfortunately, I have yet to catch the action on film.
  • gogittumgogittum SW New MexicoPosts: 2,007 Captain
    redsgurl said:
    She does not look entirely pleased with you at that moment. Lol. She is lovely tho. Look how golden that catfish is! I would love to see the salt flats recreationally and the area surrounding them. 
    I went to G.N. 8 times starting in Feb in 2000 to go out on Scammon's Lagoon in Pangas to play with the Gray Whales and their babies.  It's a real rush.  It's a narrow window - they have their calves in late Jan. and are spooky and protective of them.  Then they're sociable for a couple of weeks, then start north for Alaska.  It's a different kind of area and a tour back into the mountains to the SE is really unique.  The multi-square mile salt flat works are owned by Mitsubishi and is one of the largest sea salt operations in the world.  I roamed for miles while I was there......just don't go near the areas where heavy machinery is operating.
  • redsgurlredsgurl Posts: 610 Officer
    Beautiful photos!  There have been a few times when an Osprey has snatched a mullet out of the canal behind my house.  Unfortunately, I have yet to catch the action on film.
    Thanks. :) I have literally spent hours watching them fish. We make bets. Lol. I dunno, I just get transfixed............ If you have a camera, and you live on a canal, you need to keep that camera on the table, by the door. Charged and memory card. That camera is not gonna make you happy sitting in the bag. ;)

    gogittum said:
    I went to G.N. 8 times starting in Feb in 2000 to go out on Scammon's Lagoon in Pangas to play with the Gray Whales and their babies.  It's a real rush.  It's a narrow window - they have their calves in late Jan. and are spooky and protective of them.  Then they're sociable for a couple of weeks, then start north for Alaska.  It's a different kind of area and a tour back into the mountains to the SE is really unique.  The multi-square mile salt flat works are owned by Mitsubishi and is one of the largest sea salt operations in the world.  I roamed for miles while I was there......just don't go near the areas where heavy machinery is operating.
    Sounds super cool. In a boat? in January?  After the Orcas have been raising sand this year with the sail boats and kayaks, I have no desire to go chase whales. I have seen sharks a lot. Whales are another thing altogether.  I see the Right Whales here in March while they travel through. From shore. Never seen them close, but close enough to know exactly what they are. Majestic comes to mind. They mosey along, in no big hurry. Huge. H U G E ! And very quiet. Amazingly quiet....  Except when they blow. Holy whatever!!!!!!!!!!!!


    Suz


    Capybara's are vicious and should not be let alone with small children. In-laws are another matter.............
  • gogittumgogittum SW New MexicoPosts: 2,007 Captain
    edited November 2020 #7
    redsgurl said:
    Sounds super cool. In a boat? in January?  After the Orcas have been raising sand this year with the sail boats and kayaks, I have no desire to go chase whales. I have seen sharks a lot. Whales are another thing altogether.  I see the Right Whales here in March while they travel through. From shore. Never seen them close, but close enough to know exactly what they are. Majestic comes to mind. They mosey along, in no big hurry. Huge. H U G E ! And very quiet. Amazingly quiet....  Except when they blow. Holy whatever!!!!!!!!!!!! 


    It's halfway down the Baja but still very cold in Feb.  I took my cousins and their friends with me in '08 and cautioned them to bring warmies.  I knew they wouldn't so took all the gloves and warm hats I had and, sure enuf, they were badly needed.



    There's nothing quite like it and no sense of danger at all.  It's a fairly new recreation and as babies get used to boats and mature, they're more accepting of humans when they have their own babies.  It seems to be domino-ing and they come right to the boats to say hello.





    How many people can say they've petted a whale ??  This one's an adult.  Another passenger took this and emailed it to me.

    Facilities at Guerrero **** are good, tho' some primitive and you need to keep basic 3rd world precautions in mind.  You'll need a passport to cross into Baja Sur, just above GN.  Accomodations are good, restaurants are OK (don't drink the water or let them put ice in your Coke - drink it warm.  Ask me how I know) and the tour operators (2 of them) are very good.  Side trips to the petroglyph sites in the mountains are fascinating and the miles of huge, tangled cactus gardens are totally unique, as are the rock formations at Cataviña.

    If you ever have the opportunity to make the trip, don't even hesitate - go for it.  I always go on both trips for the day - morning and afternoon.   Anyone is welcome to PM me for more info - there's a lot to know to ease the trip.


  • redsgurlredsgurl Posts: 610 Officer
    Oh. My. God. That is so cool! Wow!!
    Suz


    Capybara's are vicious and should not be let alone with small children. In-laws are another matter.............
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