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Sambar Hunt

bsfl1bsfl1 Posts: 47 Deckhand
Hello,

I got drawn for the Sambar hunt this year and was curious what the island looked like after the Hurricane. What was tree damage like? Was the island covered by storm surge and did this cause vegetation die offs? Are the freshwater ponds now saltwater ponds? Did all the Sambar swim to the mainland? Thanks for any help.

Regards,

Brian
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Replies

  • H20dadH20dad Posts: 1,954 Captain
    They’re all dead. The fwc will release an announcement in 10 years...
  • bsfl1bsfl1 Posts: 47 Deckhand
    edited June 25 #3
    And then they will turn the island into a North Florida panther reintroduction site! 
  • H20dadH20dad Posts: 1,954 Captain
    bsfl1 said:
    And then they will turn into a North Florida panther reintroduction site! 
    Probably 
  • swampdogswampdog Central FloridaPosts: 929 Officer
    Hang in there Bsfl1, someone helpful with some actual intel might have something worthwhile to say. I’d give the folks responsible for the hunts a call. A friend of mine was hoping to make a hunt. Don’t know who he’s been communicating with. Luck!
  • bsfl1bsfl1 Posts: 47 Deckhand
    Thanks man. I connected with a buddy who I hunted the island with in 2015 who went last year that gave some good intel. I will try and do my part to further reduce the population to make more panther habitat. If anybody is heading up from S. FL for the hunt hit me up via pm.
  • Panhandler80Panhandler80 Posts: 8,212 Moderator
    Satellite imagery doesn't show many downed trees, but it does look like salt water intrusion has killed quite a few of them.  If you're climbing in the dark, make sure in a live one!  

    Below is a shot of St Vincent, and a picture of my 40 acres about 35 miles NNW.  As you can see, 30 miles can make a big big difference.

    I'm pretty sure I heard of one being seen on the mainland after the storm.  However, I imagine most were able to stay on the island.  I'm nobody's St. Vincent expert, but I think the island has quite a few ridges that would serve has decent breakwater.  So while there might have been flooding, I don't think any deer on interior of island would have had much problem hunkering down and riding it out.  Animals are pretty **** amazing when it comes to that stuff.  Heck even dumb **** cattle manage to find low spots in a pasture and survive.  


    "Whatcha doin' in my waters?"
  • bsfl1bsfl1 Posts: 47 Deckhand
    Thanks for the info. My main concern was saltwater intrusion into the freshwater ponds and if it killed feed and destabilized the water salinity to inhibit aquatic growth in certain areas that would dictate my hunt planning.
  • tampaspicertampaspicer Posts: 424 Deckhand
    bsfl1 said:
    Thanks for the info. My main concern was saltwater intrusion into the freshwater ponds and if it killed feed and destabilized the water salinity to inhibit aquatic growth in certain areas that would dictate my hunt planning.
    Taking scouting to another level.
  • gritsnhuntin1gritsnhuntin1 Posts: 1,171 Officer
    I was there last year and it was fine. Yes some trees were blown down and some were killed but for the most part it was busines as usual. You could definitely see the effects of flooding but the deer didn’t seem to mind.
  • km_hunts-06km_hunts-06 Posts: 158 Deckhand
    It’s one of the coolest hunts I’ve ever been on . My advice is hunt the marsh and be prepared to walk lol . Long story short I missed a neck shot on one at  about 150yds .
  • Panhandler80Panhandler80 Posts: 8,212 Moderator
    bsfl1 said:
    Thanks for the info. My main concern was saltwater intrusion into the freshwater ponds and if it killed feed and destabilized the water salinity to inhibit aquatic growth in certain areas that would dictate my hunt planning.
    Nah.   Entire ecosystems don't alter after one storm.   Those low spots catch rain and that's that.   Good luck.  I've never put in for it. Almost did this year. But just had too much going on.  It's a pretty neat little piece of Florida.  Just don't tell too many of the Yankees down south.   ;-)

    I hope that comment wasn't racist.  After all, I am a 39 year old white male.  You know us!
    "Whatcha doin' in my waters?"
  • needtohuntmoreneedtohuntmore MelbournePosts: 244 Deckhand
    Most of the Sambar are gone.  I think they thin them so they don’t destroy the island.  Last time I was there did see squat except a few pigs and snakes.  I can’t believe people waste money and time on that hunt. I think you have like a 5% chance of getting one and there is one good spot that isn’t a safe zone.
  • H20dadH20dad Posts: 1,954 Captain
    Fwc thinks it’s the fantasy that people want, not the meat....
  • aqualifeaqualife JupiterPosts: 51 Deckhand
    Anyone on here ever eat samba deer meat? Is it just like other deer meat?


  • needtohuntmoreneedtohuntmore MelbournePosts: 244 Deckhand
    I have heard the meat is ok, probably like any other venison and depends of how you handle it.  You more than likely won’t get that far though.  I went a few times and then realized Elk hunting out west is just as cheap with way higher odds.
  • Panhandler80Panhandler80 Posts: 8,212 Moderator
    I have heard the meat is ok, probably like any other venison and depends of how you handle it.  You more than likely won’t get that far though.  I went a few times and then realized Elk hunting out west is just as cheap with way higher odds.
    When you get a chance, I'd love to see how you spread those numbers.   
    "Whatcha doin' in my waters?"
  • swampdogswampdog Central FloridaPosts: 929 Officer
    I was thinking same thing. St. Vincent costs is on a parallel with Elk hunt out west. 
  • H20dadH20dad Posts: 1,954 Captain
    Maybe the cost of the elk tag out west. Now, to get success the number of trips to st Vincent 20 if 5% success could equal the cost of a trip out west with a guaranteed kill effectively what many hunts have become 80+%
  • needtohuntmoreneedtohuntmore MelbournePosts: 244 Deckhand
    Exactly plus you have to own a boat to get there or pay $$ to have someone drop you off and pick you up.  There are many elk hunts that you can DIY for around $1500 and have great success.  If you get a tag 10 times you would only have a 40% chance which is what I have been batting on elk hunts.
  • bowhunter4lifebowhunter4life Posts: 1,492 Officer
    edited June 28 #21
    One day I will trailer my boat up to maryland and hunt Sika deer on the eastern shore. I’ve been told the meat is excellent. Just need time and money.
  • H20dadH20dad Posts: 1,954 Captain
    One day I will trailer my boat up to maryland and hunt Sika deer on the eastern shore. I’ve been told the meat is excellent. Just need time and money.
    Gun season is during the rut too. 
  • Mr_WatsonMr_Watson Ten Thousand IslandsPosts: 114 Deckhand
    Always apply to this hunt, hope to get a chance sometime in the next few years. I always wondered about the meat as well..
  • needtohuntmoreneedtohuntmore MelbournePosts: 244 Deckhand
    There is one good spot on the entire island.  Most Sambar are taken within a few hundred yards of it.  I will give you a couple clues.  If you aren't staying at West Pass Camp you are wasting your time.  The red zones are there to protect native species as well as prevent the Sambar from being wiped out on hunts.  It's kind of like tag.  The honey hole is approx 2 miles from camp.  Have fun!
  • H20dadH20dad Posts: 1,954 Captain
    There is one good spot on the entire island.  Most Sambar are taken within a few hundred yards of it.  I will give you a couple clues.  If you aren't staying at West Pass Camp you are wasting your time.  The red zones are there to protect native species as well as prevent the Sambar from being wiped out on hunts.  It's kind of like tag.  The honey hole is approx 2 miles from camp.  Have fun!
    Where in Florida were you born?
  • needtohuntmoreneedtohuntmore MelbournePosts: 244 Deckhand
  • James243James243 Posts: 788 Officer
    aqualife said:
    Anyone on here ever eat samba deer meat? Is it just like other deer meat?


    I have eaten a lot of it. It's a lighter colored meat and has a good flavor, but it's tough. On the stag I killed, medium rare backstrap is chewy at best. It's not what I consider prime eating when it comes to steak. It is great burger, roast, jerky, cubed.  The only exception is if you get one that's still nursing, then it's noticeably better. 

    When it comes to odds, I have harvested one 3/5 trips. It's definitely not an easy hunt and I have to agree there is a certain area with lots of sign that's hard not to focus on. 
  • needtohuntmoreneedtohuntmore MelbournePosts: 244 Deckhand
    3/5 you must have hunted it back in the 90s
  • James243James243 Posts: 788 Officer
    edited July 1 #29
    3/5 you must have hunted it back in the 90s
    Nope, I've been: '12, '13, '14, '15, & '17 and gotten one every other trip, so I probably won't get one this year.  But i have high hopes.  BTW, I'm not picky about what I shoot. 
  • H20dadH20dad Posts: 1,954 Captain
    James243 said:
    3/5 you must have hunted it back in the 90s
    Nope, I've been: '12, '13, '14, '15, & '17 and gotten one every other trip, so I probably won't get one this year.  But i have high hopes.  BTW, I'm not picky about what I shoot. 
    Any idea on the weight of the ones you shot?  I read they are third after elk in size but the pictures make them look midwestern deer size. 
  • James243James243 Posts: 788 Officer
    The stag I got weighed 385 field dressed and he had a big gut. The two "tender" ones were maybe 200 on the hoof. 
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