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Any here who sail?

Parker boyParker boy Posts: 124 Deckhand
I have always owned powerboats and very little exposure to sailboats. I had a cousin who had a small day sailboat of around 25 ft but that was many years ago.

I have recently, since retiring, been hooked on YouTube videos of sailing. I think I may like to buy a small boat around 20 ft to learn on.

Any advice for a rank amateur who is a senior citizen?
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Replies

  • AC ManAC Man Posts: 6,013 Admiral
    I know when you get older your interest changes but I'm just going to say no the blow boat in my old age. I could see myself in a trawler though. My biggest thing now is someone an air-conditioned cabin and I'm not interested in going fast. That's just me.
  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 2,709 Captain
    My dad bought me a small snark when I was about ten.  Such great memories!  My sailing experience ended there but I've dreamt of one day buying a decent sized catamaran that I can sail to the islands, or further.  Have several friends that said they'll disown me if I buy one lol
    There will never be a really free and enlightened state until the state comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived.
  • swampdogswampdog Central FloridaPosts: 932 Officer
    Sailing looks intriguing, but it appears expensive and something a younger person should pursue. I’ve ridden horses, a few bucking horses (to impress a cowgirl), drove airboats, motor boats, swamp buggies, motor cycles, and a circle track race car. My time for a sailboat has sailed....

    Good luck!
  • AC ManAC Man Posts: 6,013 Admiral
    edited June 1 #5
    I agree, sailboat seem like a Northeastern Yankee thing. I lived in South Florida Central Florida my whole life I never knew one person that owned the sailboat
  • Bimini_TwistedBimini_Twisted TampaPosts: 1,507 Captain
    We used to rent sailboats all the time growing up in Miami out of Dinner Key. Was a bear to tact while trying to keep it in the channel and out of the flats at Stiltsville.

    I'd try and find a rental fleet where you live and get some practice. Have lots of friends that have sailed all over the Caribbean and apparently there is nothing like it.

    Please keep us posted



     
  • Gary SGary S Posts: 2,040 Captain
    I have a friend with a 42 foot moan in Titusville, he also has a early 70s 32 foot westwind that has never been in the water. The bow spirit (thats the part that extends out the front that helps support the mast) rotted out and was termite eaten. I but him a new one out of stainless steel. He also has a partnership in another one that is in Ft Lauderdale.He tries to get me excited about them but I just tell him they are too much work and don;t go fast enough. 
     He also has a 28 Bertram That I put twin outboards on, thats the boat his family likes.
  • ferris1248ferris1248 Posts: 7,328 Moderator
    swampdog said:
    Sailing looks intriguing, but it appears expensive and something a younger person should pursue. I’ve ridden horses, a few bucking horses (to impress a cowgirl), drove airboats, motor boats, swamp buggies, motor cycles, and a circle track race car. My time for a sailboat has sailed....

    Good luck!
    Sailing is pretty cool. Laidback and relaxing for the most part. It's also not expensive. A trailerable overnighter with a small kicker motor is pretty reasonable pricewise.
    "What fools can not control, they will attempt to destroy."

    RJG

    "That which is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow. That is the whole of the law. The rest is commentary."

    Rabbi Hillel (c20 BCE)

  • backwatercolebackwatercole Posts: 184 Deckhand
    ParkerBoy.  Where are you located?  There are a lot of good clubs and/or schools to get involved in.  I would definitely recommend trying a few, hiring a captain to take you out for a few days, or take a charter down in the Caribbean or in The Bahamas once the lockdowns start to ease.  Sailing is fun, yes, it can be a lot of work, but the feeling of getting into the "groove" of the wind and feeling the boat heel is incredible...at least in my opinion.  I still love power boating, but sailing is a lot of fun.  A monohull is the best for this feeling and ideal to do by yourself or with other like-minded people.  A sail catamaran is great for the family and the wife that wants more stability.  Dinking around in small hobie cats can really get you a lot of experience and understanding how to read the wind.  Offshore Sailing School with the Colgate family is a great place for learning to sail and getting some credentials if that's the route you want to take.  They have several locations on the Gulf in Florida and one in the BVI.  A lot of the larger monohulls and sail cats all have electric winches which, to some purists is "cheating", but really help to take a lot of the back breaking work out of sailing.  
  • ferris1248ferris1248 Posts: 7,328 Moderator
    Gardawg said:
    Power boats go fast so you can  get to where you want to be

    Sail boats go slow because you're already where you want to be. 


    That's profound. :)

    But very true. 
    "What fools can not control, they will attempt to destroy."

    RJG

    "That which is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow. That is the whole of the law. The rest is commentary."

    Rabbi Hillel (c20 BCE)

  • gogittumgogittum SW New MexicoPosts: 398 Deckhand
    edited June 1 #13
    AC Man said:
    I know when you get older your interest changes but I'm just going to say no the blow boat in my old age. I could see myself in a trawler though. My biggest thing now is someone an air-conditioned cabin and I'm not interested in going fast. That's just me.
    I'm with ya 100%.  I've sailed in many sailboats over the years in several areas and they Are fun - for a while.

    For me, sitting there watching and trimming the sails and feeling the power of the wind is fun for a while, but after a bit I get to wondering, "what else can it do ??"  It gets boring....and I'm talking larger - 40 - 75 ft boats.  Remember, at best you're going 5 - 7 mph and frequently - mostly - much less than that.  Takes a very long time to get anywhere.

    My biggest bug, esp. on multi-day trips was that you can't get comfortable - if you're under sail, you're heeled over and you brace your feet against something while your pants ride up into your, uh....??....and you go like that until you finally drop the sails.  Gets "very" tiresome.

    At anchor, you're sitting down in a cave with little slit windows high up.  Can't see 'nuthin' out there. 

    I love the British Columbia coast and have gone many miles over many years up there - under sail & under power. 



    Chasing Orcas in Johnstone Strait is a gas,



    as are the Sea Otters in Quatsino Sound.  I have stories of it.  I could definitely see myself in a trawler, cruising along....comfortably....in the summertime.  
  • Turner River TerrorTurner River Terror Posts: 7,613 Admiral
    First boat I ever Captained was a 48 Hatteras Long Range Cruiser.
    Good boat and I would enjoy that cause it had a big Salon and great A/C.
    Anything slower than that I'd be drunk time I got halfway there....
    Killin and Grillin :grin
  • ferris1248ferris1248 Posts: 7,328 Moderator
    I almost bought a Grand Banks 42 Sedan one time. Still kick myself for not pulling the trigger.
    "What fools can not control, they will attempt to destroy."

    RJG

    "That which is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow. That is the whole of the law. The rest is commentary."

    Rabbi Hillel (c20 BCE)

  • tankeredtankered Gainesvill, FlPosts: 223 Deckhand

    I raced sailboats as a kid, both solo and as crew on larger boats. I learned WAY more about the water, navigation, weather, etc. than one would if your only exposure was to power boats.

    Some years back I was aboard a 65' twin mast (ketch I believe but not 100% sure) sailboat for 10 days in the Bahamas. We mostly were under power and the mizzen because it was August and very calm, until the last day when a good sustained 15 kt breeze picked up in the wake of a tropical storm.

    The way that big beast lurched out from under your feet when the sails were raised was very impressive, the diesel didn't do that.

    I got on the tender with the mate and everyone's cameras (long before one smartphone would do the trick) to get pics of the boat under sail and it walked away from the tender,  little RIB with a 25 hp kicker. They had to put the auxiliary in reverse so we could get broadside for pics and drop the sails entirely when it was time to load back up.

    I think a little 20 or so footer would be a blast.

  • MRichardsonMRichardson Posts: 10,239 AG
    edited June 1 #17
    Sailing is generally for a more cerebral, refined type than most of the members here.  Fishermen and powerboaters generally are not nearly as schooled and competent in the technical aspects of seafaring.

    Sailboats are far more seaworthy, capable than what we use to fish (including the sportfishers, etc.).  You can basically go anywhere - you don't need fuel. I've known many older sailors, though it probably helps if you learn it while you're young.  It ain't rocket science, unless you want it to be, but it does take a certain amount of mental horsepower that the general FL boater does not have nor is interested in having.
    I have never seen live bones, but I know that they are often used by rich people to decorate the interior.
  • Ron38SpecialRon38Special S FloridaPosts: 56 Deckhand
    how is this for sailing!

    Showed up outside my office window this morning.
  • Bruce SBruce S Posts: 500 Deckhand
    I raced 20’ catamarans for many years. Nothing like being double trapped reaching to the windward mark.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • dave44dave44 Posts: 10,858 AG
    I’ve only sailed 5 or 6 times, it was great,( but my job was mainly drinkin).
        I’ve often thought about getting one, but then I would need a captain.
  • dave44dave44 Posts: 10,858 AG

    The parade of ships is pretty cool here though!
  • AC ManAC Man Posts: 6,013 Admiral
    Back in 1970 the most impressive boat at our marina when I was a kid was a full teak deck that I was told was a 90ft sailboat owned by Firestone. That would be a killer ride, but not something I would want to deal with day in and day out as a owner.Coral Springs Marina Ft. Lauderdale. Good old days.
  • MRichardsonMRichardson Posts: 10,239 AG
    how is this for sailing!

    Showed up outside my office window this morning.
    Is that Eos?  My brother said it was up in Savannah last week. Not a bad little daysailer.
    I have never seen live bones, but I know that they are often used by rich people to decorate the interior.
  • ferris1248ferris1248 Posts: 7,328 Moderator
    "What fools can not control, they will attempt to destroy."

    RJG

    "That which is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow. That is the whole of the law. The rest is commentary."

    Rabbi Hillel (c20 BCE)

  • AC ManAC Man Posts: 6,013 Admiral
    I would be scared to death to be in charge of that vessel and crew. Even though I've been on all types of boats my entire life. I would be interested in catching a ride on a sailboat like that under sail just to see what it's like. Lot of respect to those folks
  • Gary SGary S Posts: 2,040 Captain
    I went to a shipyard somewhere in Rhode Island a few years back and they were restoring a tall ship. It was a cool experience that I remember but not the name of the boat yard.
  • FloridaODFloridaOD Posts: 3,727 Captain
    At any given time at least half of those in the market for any vessel, any type, power or sail should simply Stop- do not buy any boat.

    Small craft sailing vessel can be ideal at later years.

    I am currently sailing a nine foot Fatty Knees. 
    A slightly larger sail boat with elevated seats etc would be great too.
    shucks, maybe a Catalina 22.
    Or a couple feet longer- steering wheel!
    Inboard engine!
    40 Catalina
    Hunters are present yet relatively uncommon in Florida :wink
  • ferris1248ferris1248 Posts: 7,328 Moderator
    FloridaOD said:
    At any given time at least half of those in the market for any vessel, any type, power or sail should simply Stop- do not buy any boat.

    Small craft sailing vessel can be ideal at later years.

    I am currently sailing a nine foot Fatty Knees. 
    A slightly larger sail boat with elevated seats etc would be great too.
    shucks, maybe a Catalina 22.
    Or a couple feet longer- steering wheel!
    Inboard engine!
    40 Catalina
    That's a neat little rig. A proven, ageless design.


    "What fools can not control, they will attempt to destroy."

    RJG

    "That which is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow. That is the whole of the law. The rest is commentary."

    Rabbi Hillel (c20 BCE)

  • MRichardsonMRichardson Posts: 10,239 AG
    It'd be hard to get laid w/that boat.

    I have never seen live bones, but I know that they are often used by rich people to decorate the interior.
  • Team SabatageTeam Sabatage USA, USA, USAPosts: 12,975 AG
    Sailing big boats when you are old sucks if you don't have a young capable crew.  Everything is fine, until some of the rigging gets snarled and someone has to climb the mast...
    I've sailed much of my life.  Sabots, Cape Cod Knockabouts, FJ's, J22's, owned a Catalina 26 and crewed on sail yachts over 100' like Atlanta, Georgia and Ranger.
    Ranger was a blast but not the relaxing ride you think of when you think of sailing.  Very intense, very active, very fast.  Sailing at 18kts gets your attention and keeps it.  The stress you can hear the hull under is almost scary.

    I suggest to find a club that has Sabots to start or a sunfish that you can flip and get right back up and going again.  After that an FJ will be a nice step up to learn using a jib sail along with a main.  If you are still thinking you want to own, by then you will have met lots of people with lots of knowlege to help you step up to a boat with a cabin.
    Strap me in, tie me down and roll me a bone, I'm getting on an airplane and I'm flying home...
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