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MY explanations of slow pitch jigging terminology, and a basic understanding of actions.

demersalangelerdemersalangeler SE FLORIDA Posts: 437 Deckhand
 For those of you that are interested. I have done a write up explaining slow pitch jigging terminology. If you are interested please comment, and I will continue to advance the subject. 

 AS WITH ALL FISHING. THIS IS BASED ON MY PERSONAL EXPERIENCE, AND OPINION. 


      A BASIC EXPLANATION OF SLOW PITCH JIGGING TERMINOLOGY. 


  WHAT DOES PITCH MEAN IN SLOW PITCH JIGGING? 
 We all understand slow, and jigging. So what does pitch mean? The best way for me to explain it is to use softball as an example. In slow pitch softball the pitcher throws the ball forward slowly, and in a upward trajectory. When the ball reaches it's apex it begins to move in a downward trajectory. The same is happening with the jig. To the Asian inventors of SPJ the word pitch means to throw. Think of it as slow throw jigging. To pitch is to throw the lure into action. 


     WHAT DOES THE WORD HIGH IN HIGH PITCH JIGGING MEAN?
 In fast pitch softball the pitcher throws the ball quickly in a flat trajectory. The same is true in high pitch jigging.The word high in high pitch jigging is fast, or powerful. We may know of high speed jigging, or vertical jigging. These are both forms of high pitch jigging, and are at the opposite end of the jigging spectrum from SPJ. High pitch, or a fast tempo may may be incorporated into SPJ. Whether the presentation is in a vertical, or horizontal manner is up to the angler. 


   WHAT IS A CONTACT? 
 A contact is a strike. The contact is one of the most important forms of feedback the ocean gives you. The contact or lack thereof tells the angler if their quary is interested in his, or her presentation. 



    A BASIC UNDERSTANDING OF HOW TO PITCH THE JIG.

 
      THE ROD PITCHES THE JIG. 
 A slow pitch rod has a parabolic action. When the tip is loaded the rod springs back, and employs the jig into action. 


      BASIC METHODS TO PITCH THE JIG. 
 There are two basic methods to pitch the jig. One is to move the rod. I put this in the jerking category. The second is to turn the reel handle. I put this in the cranking category. In these main categories there are many subcategories of motions. Some of the simple submotions are 1/4, 1/2, and 1 turn of the reel handle. This may be confusing to some because they are all commonly referred to as a pitch. In reality a pitch is any motion that throws the jig into action.

                                                                                                                         
                                                                             WHAT IS THE ACTION TONE? 
 The action tone is a way of conveying how strongly the rod tip rebounds. There are many contributing factors to this. Such as jig weight, jig resistance, jig depth, line thickness, line angle, rod angle, boat drift, water resistance, current, and wind resistance. Just to name a few.
 I classify the action tone in a few ranges from soft - mid, mid - firm, firm - strong, and strong - heavy. In the soft action tone range the tip may not completely rebound. In the heavy action tone range the tip rebounds quickly, and completely. The tip may even exhibit a oscillation after completely rebounding. 


      UNDERSTANDING THE BASIC ROD  ANGLES. 
 The rod can be tracked in degrees, or mapped on the clock by position. 
There are 2 basic rod angle ranges. I categorize them into upper, and lower ranges. The lower range is between 0 degrees straight down, and 90 degrees straight out. The upper range is between 90 degrees, and to around 160 degrees almost straight up. 180 degrees can be reached in certain situations, but is not always recommended. In the straight up position the line can become tip wrapped causing a line breakage, or a breakage of the rod. 


          UNDERSTANDING THE BASIC RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ROD ANGLE AND JIG ACTIONS. 
 The rod can be swept,  jerked thru the entire lower, and upper ranges together. It can also be moved in individual quadrants. These may be as much as 90 degrees, or as little as 1 degree. It is up to the presentation the angler desires, or rather the presentation the quarry finds desirable. 
 Typically when using reel cranking to pitch the jig the rod is held at 90 degrees. The handle is turned, and abruptly stopped. This allows the rod to load, and then unload. Pitching the lure. The rod angle is not limited to 90 degrees in this action. It can be held within the entire range. Varying degrees of angle will load the rod differently. Thus changing the action tone to change, and varies how the lure reacts to the pitch.
 when cranking the reel to pitch the jig. the rod can be held steadily at one angle, or swept while cranking. There are many micro actions that can be incorporated to increase the complexity of the lure action. The rod can be jerked, and the handle can be turned to take up slack line, and limit the time fall time of the jig. 

   BASIC LURE ACTIONS. 
 There are what I consider four basic jig actions. The first is the fall of the jig. The second is a horizontal sliding motion. The third is a stalling, or suspending action. The fourth is the upward motion of the jig.
 These basic actions can be utilized individually, or combined to increase the complexity of the lure action. 


 IS THE LURE A PIECE OF METAL OR A LIVE  ANIMAL?
This depends on the state of animation of the jig. If the lure in at rest it is not alive, but when it is animated by the angler it can be a live creature. 
 To me the jig is my own remote control live animal. I control how, and where it swims. I control if it is injured, or healthy. I control if it flees to the surface, or to the bottom. I can even control what type of creature it is.

Replies

  • GeneakersGeneakers West Palm BeachPosts: 173 Deckhand
    I'm in... lets go fishin!
  • zimmy4209zimmy4209 Ocala FloridaPosts: 1,157 Officer
    Well put thanks for sharing!
  • kellerclkellercl Posts: 6,356 Admiral
    I've read about folks jigging inshore via 10-30 ft holes.  Any suggestions on jigs?  I've been wanting to give it a try.  


    “When you're good at something, you'll tell everyone. When you're great at something, they'll tell you.”

    -Walter Payton
  • Alex from GAAlex from GA Posts: 1,511 Captain
    As a predominately bass fisherman from deep water impoundments I spoon jig a lot.  It's about the same as saltwater jigging but with smaller jigs.  I have used the same jigs I used in saltwater inshore when I had a place on the Manatee River.  My neighbor and I would go fishing and he'd use live shrimp and I used jigs and usually outfished him.  We'd catch mostly white trout and whiting but everything bit the spoon.  The same as freshwater when bass, striped bass, white bass, catfish, crappie and walleye are caught.  In the 60s through the 90s I fished offshore in CA with metal jigs that we used in the same way as the jigs today are fished.  We called it yo yo jigging.
  • kellerclkellercl Posts: 6,356 Admiral
    As a predominately bass fisherman from deep water impoundments I spoon jig a lot.  It's about the same as saltwater jigging but with smaller jigs.  I have used the same jigs I used in saltwater inshore when I had a place on the Manatee River.  My neighbor and I would go fishing and he'd use live shrimp and I used jigs and usually outfished him.  We'd catch mostly white trout and whiting but everything bit the spoon.  The same as freshwater when bass, striped bass, white bass, catfish, crappie and walleye are caught.  In the 60s through the 90s I fished offshore in CA with metal jigs that we used in the same way as the jigs today are fished.  We called it yo yo jigging.
    Spoon as in something like a Kastmaster or Johnson?  I want to give jigging a try in June.  There is a place I kayak often.  Typically it is 5-8 ft, but there is a giant 40 ft hole randomly that I noticed last time.  Maybe I'll pop a spoon down there.  I was thinking a bucktail, with a gulp attached a bit higher up (14-18 inches).


    “When you're good at something, you'll tell everyone. When you're great at something, they'll tell you.”

    -Walter Payton
  • demersalangelerdemersalangeler SE FLORIDA Posts: 437 Deckhand
    kellercl said:
    I've read about folks jigging inshore via 10-30 ft holes.  Any suggestions on jigs?  I've been wanting to give it a try.  


     I think this is what you may be interested in. 

     There is a form of jigging known as micro jigging. It utilises the same basic concepts of SPJ. However the jigs are mutch smaller. Usaly as little as 10g in weight, and no more than 100g. The tackle is scaled down even more, so from SPJ tackle, and the presentation is more of a horizontal presentation.


     Most of my jigs are sourced from other countries. I look on eBay, Amazon, and some Asian tackle web sites. If you have trouble finding them. PM me and i can try, and help. 

  • demersalangelerdemersalangeler SE FLORIDA Posts: 437 Deckhand
    As a predominately bass fisherman from deep water impoundments I spoon jig a lot.  It's about the same as saltwater jigging but with smaller jigs.  I have used the same jigs I used in saltwater inshore when I had a place on the Manatee River.  My neighbor and I would go fishing and he'd use live shrimp and I used jigs and usually outfished him.  We'd catch mostly white trout and whiting but everything bit the spoon.  The same as freshwater when bass, striped bass, white bass, catfish, crappie and walleye are caught.  In the 60s through the 90s I fished offshore in CA with metal jigs that we used in the same way as the jigs today are fished.  We called it yo yo jigging.
     Yes this technique is not new. It is hundreds, or maybe even thosanths of years old. 
    In the recent past the tackle has seen great advancements in technology, and refinements in technique. With this the method has regained some popularity. 

     If a fish is predatory it can be caught on some type of jigging method. I my self have out fished bait with jigs. I have also been known to joke about how my bait is still there, alive when other bait is gone, or dead. 
  • demersalangelerdemersalangeler SE FLORIDA Posts: 437 Deckhand
    " Spoon as in something like a Kastmaster or Johnson?  I want to give jigging a try in June.  There is a place I kayak often.  Typically it is 5-8 ft, but there is a giant 40 ft hole randomly that I noticed last time.  Maybe I'll pop a spoon down there.  I was thinking a bucktail, with a gulp attached a bit higher up (14-18 inches)."

    I used to fish in a deep inlet in the pan handle. We commonly used jig heads with gulp shrimp, and crippled hearing lures. We caught many bull reds, gruper, and even octopus. 
  • kellerclkellercl Posts: 6,356 Admiral
    kellercl said:
    I've read about folks jigging inshore via 10-30 ft holes.  Any suggestions on jigs?  I've been wanting to give it a try.  


     I think this is what you may be interested in. 

     There is a form of jigging known as micro jigging. It utilises the same basic concepts of SPJ. However the jigs are mutch smaller. Usaly as little as 10g in weight, and no more than 100g. The tackle is scaled down even more, so from SPJ tackle, and the presentation is more of a horizontal presentation.


     Most of my jigs are sourced from other countries. I look on eBay, Amazon, and some Asian tackle web sites. If you have trouble finding them. PM me and i can try, and help. 

    I'll read up on microjigging, I may reach out.  Thanks for the information.  This was well put together. 


    “When you're good at something, you'll tell everyone. When you're great at something, they'll tell you.”

    -Walter Payton
  • demersalangelerdemersalangeler SE FLORIDA Posts: 437 Deckhand
     Thanks.
     I tried to explain it the best way I thaught possible. How I began to understand it after struggling in the beginning. Only after years of research, experience, trial, and error did I begin to understand. 

     I am going to continue writing, and advancing the subject. Each time becoming more technical, and providing more insight. I actually have another section written. I just need to pull it up on the pc, proof read, and post.  Expect it soon. 
  • Alex from GAAlex from GA Posts: 1,511 Captain
    Flexit or Hopkins are the most commonly used spoons in freshwater.  Usually white or chrome but sometimes chartruese..  They come in 1/4 oz to over 1 oz and are deadly.  I use a locally made spoon from the Georgia Blade Co in 1/2 or 3/4 oz sizes mostly.
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