Bear cam in Alaska

Replies

  • Doc StressorDoc Stressor Homosassa, FLPosts: 2,486 Captain
    It's only fun if you aren't a biologist who notices things like how underweight they are.  You can see ribs showing on several bears who should all be fat as pigs by now.

    With record high temperatures and drought this past summer and still little rain, the salmon runs are way down.

    The Brooks Falls camera is better than watching the one at Macrae's, however. ;)
  • thebigone556thebigone556 the seaPosts: 58 Greenhorn
    It's only fun if you aren't a biologist who notices things like how underweight they are.  You can see ribs showing on several bears who should all be fat as pigs by now.

    With record high temperatures and drought this past summer and still little rain, the salmon runs are way down.

    The Brooks Falls camera is better than watching the one at Macrae's, however. ;)
    Aren't king salmon populations way down all along the west coast?
  • Doc StressorDoc Stressor Homosassa, FLPosts: 2,486 Captain
    edited October 14 #4
    Yes, most of the wild stocks are endangered or threatened.  Dams, water diversion for agriculture, overfishing, genetic mixing with hatchery strains, watershed destruction from logging, and climate change are all factors. But most of the fish on our west coast are hatchery fish.  So California is actually having a pretty good king salmon season right now because of good ocean conditions a few years ago.

    Alaska manages most of its salmon fisheries as wild stocks.  While fishing pressure is very high, there is less logging and generally plenty of water cool enough to support spawning and rearing in most of the creeks and rivers. They have a rule that doesn't allow a hatchery within 50 miles of a river or stream with a natural run with only a few historical exceptions.  The drought and record high temperatures this summer have had a big impact on king salmon since they are main channel spawners that require deep rivers that have a lot of water during the summer.  But it was so bad this summer that even chums and pinks, which spawn in smaller creeks near the estuaries, were dying before they could reproduce. 

    The fish running in Brooks Falls this time of year should be silver (coho) salmon.  I don't think there are kings in that system.

    When I lived on the west coast I used to study heat stress in salmon.  I got to go to amazing places and see amazing things.  It was depressing to watch what was going on when we were up in AK this summer. 
  • thebigone556thebigone556 the seaPosts: 58 Greenhorn
    Yes, most of the wild stocks are endangered or threatened.  Dams, water diversion for agriculture, overfishing, genetic mixing with hatchery strains, watershed destruction from logging, and climate change are all factors. But most of the fish on our west coast are hatchery fish.  So California is actually having a pretty good king salmon season right now because of good ocean conditions a few years ago.

    Alaska manages most of its salmon fisheries as wild stocks.  While fishing pressure is very high, there is less logging and generally plenty of water cool enough to support spawning and rearing in most of the creeks and rivers. They have a rule that doesn't allow a hatchery within 50 miles of a river or stream with a natural run with only a few historical exceptions.  The drought and record high temperatures this summer have had a big impact on king salmon since they are main channel spawners that require deep rivers that have a lot of water during the summer.  But it was so bad this summer that even chums and pinks, what spawn in smaller creeks near the estuaries were dying before they could reproduce. 

    The fish running in Brooks Falls this time of year should be silver (coho) salmon.  I don't think there are kings in that system.

    When I lived on the west coast I used to study heat stress in salmon.  I got to go to amazing places and see amazing things.  It was depressing to watch what was going on when we were up in AK this summer. 
    Thanks for all the info, you seem very knowledgeable.
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