Question about stocking my new pond with fish

I just had a pond dug on my property last weekend.  I needed the dirt to build up the backstop at the shooting range so I can shoot from longer range and as a bonus I have a new pond.  The pond is only about 15' X 30' but 20' deep.  Once it got down to about 10'  water was seeping out of the side wall and as it got deeper the water was seeping out of the bottom too.  By last night it completely filled the pond...thanks to the rain. 
I was thinking about stock the pond with fish in the future.  I was thinking about catfish, tilapia and bullhead minnow but wasn't sure if the pond is large enough to support fish of such size.  Is there any website about stocking fish in ponds where I can learn?
I also have a larger 120' X 200' pond on the property that was dug before I purchased the property that was stocked with LM Bass, catfish, crappie, bluegill and minnows 20+ years ago and they are still alive and thriving (well I think thriving as I see bass and bluegill beds on the side) so I would think I can stock the small pond too,
         
   

Replies

  • zimmy4209zimmy4209 Ocala FloridaPosts: 188 Deckhand
    Imo sunfish or bluegill are worst thing to stock in a pond. Takes a matter of a year or 2 before they are overpopulated and no way to get rid of em. I guess it's better than no fish but certainly becomes a headache quick.
  • bicyclistbicyclist FlardaPosts: 375 Deckhand
    zimmy4209 said:
    Imo sunfish or bluegill are worst thing to stock in a pond. Takes a matter of a year or 2 before they are overpopulated and no way to get rid of em. I guess it's better than no fish but certainly becomes a headache quick.
    large mouth would take care of them if the coons don't get em
  • AlwaysLearningMoreAlwaysLearningMore Posts: 90 Greenhorn
    A fun thing to do would be to stock it with a few bluegill, then hope that somehow a small snook or two mysteriously found their way in there.  Snook grow large and fat when sharing digs with bluegill.  On a separate note, with a bowl-sided pond like that you should probably add an aerator if you are serious about keeping any number of fish alive.  To answer your first question, this would be a good place to look:

    https://myfwc.com/conservation/you-conserve/recreation/pond-management/
  • capt louiecapt louie citrus countyPosts: 9,929 Moderator
    Guess it depends on if you plan on eating the fish.
    "You'll get your weather"
  • zimmy4209zimmy4209 Ocala FloridaPosts: 188 Deckhand
    bicyclist said:
    zimmy4209 said:
    Imo sunfish or bluegill are worst thing to stock in a pond. Takes a matter of a year or 2 before they are overpopulated and no way to get rid of em. I guess it's better than no fish but certainly becomes a headache quick.
    large mouth would take care of them if the coons don't get em
    Only panfish coons ever got out of our ponds were ones we caught and threw on bank for em after dark. Loaded with 5lb largemouth also yet always seemed to be hundreds of quarter size bluegill everywhere. Like coyotes once you got em you ain't getting rid of them
  • bmoodybmoody Posts: 977 Officer

    You have received a good piece of advice -- consult the FWC pond construction and management booklet.

    Why would you consider Tilapia?  Unless you are planning some kind of aquaculture effort, which will require an AQ certificate from DACS, avoid them.

    15x30 is a small pond -- it will be difficult to manage; the ecosystem balance it will support is likely to be very fragile.

    Catfish are unlikely to do very well absent supplemental feeding.

  • kci-miakci-mia Posts: 248 Deckhand
    I didn't know FWC put out information about ponds.  That looks like the place to start.  The big pond is just for kids to fish and they take out bluegills frequently and occasional LM bass or catfish.  I was thinking about stocking the new small pond to grow fish for food for my family...thus tilapia and catfish with minnow to control mesquite larvae.  I just want to try it for fun to see if it will work.   I don't mind supplemental feeding as I can just put a feeder on the side and program it run it once or twice a day.        
  • LostconchLostconch Posts: 418 Deckhand
    Aren't tilapia considered an invasive this requiring a special permit
  • JonsredfishinJonsredfishin Posts: 1,609 Captain
    edited August 15 #10
    I wonder if a walleye or a Muskie could survive in a chilled aerated pond or in one of our springs. That’d be cool. 


    Ive heard good things about these folks if you need good advice:


    One president put a man on the moon.
    Another president put a man in the Lady's bathroom.
  • CaptDavidGonzalezCaptDavidGonzalez Atlanta/SarasotaPosts: 35 Greenhorn
    15' x 30' is more swimming pool size. I'm in the dirt business and as you said, the hole probably sloughed in, caved in the walls as water seeped in, more so though from the steep slopes of the walls. It isn't 20' deep anymore. You said it filled up after it rained. Will be interesting to see where the water level settles.

    I wouldn't think many fish would do well in such a small hole. Water quality, temperature, and oxygen are going to be the biggest foes you'll face. 

    I would try a small amount of catfish and minnows first to see if anything will survive. Definitely feed the cats as they won't have anything to eat for a while. 
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