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atmospheric pressure

WetBanditWetBandit Posts: 124 Deckhand
Still haven't quite figure out how to use barometric pressure to my advantage in terms of fishing.  Can anyone lend some expertise?

I read all the time that big swings in barometric either up or down can spark a bite and that certain pressure trends can kill a bite.  What I can't find is hard information about what qualifies as a 'big swing' or what sort of pressure prediction would cause a fella to think about staying home. How much change over what period of time is significant?

I'm asking as it pertains to saltwater and freshwater fishing.  I would appreciate any information on how people are absorbing this information and using it to make fishing decisions.

Also, I've mostly looked at windfinder and wunderground for this information.  If anyone has a better data source to share that would be great.


Replies

  • brandonmasteranglerbrandonmasterangler BrandonPosts: 25 Greenhorn
    I have no meteorological degree, but I can tell you a falling barometer is best. As an example, when cold fronts move into Florida, even mild temperature fronts, the fish will bite well before the front and get extreme lock jaw after the front passes. 

    The same goes for low pressure systems, tropical storms, hurricanes etc. In all these cases the falling barometer before the weather is the reason for the better bite, IMO.
  • tankardtankard Posts: 7,030 Admiral
    Exactly what was said above, IMO.
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 16,406 AG
    Its the same for hunting i believe.
    You can't pet a dead dog back to life 
  • PicmanPicman Posts: 312 Deckhand
    Humans stock up at publix before a blow!😂😎
  • TarponatorTarponator Under a BridgePosts: 18,918 AG
    edited August 2019 #7
    I've always been skeptical about fish being able to sense the tiny drops in barometric pressure much less ahead of the actual event/front, and given that water depth has a far greater effect on them.  How would a fish even know?

    I wonder if a scientific study studying fish behavior with respect barometric pressure and controlling for other factors has been done.  Hmmm.
  • ericfericf Posts: 463 Deckhand
    I've always been skeptical about fish being able to sense the tiny drops in barometric pressure much less ahead of the actual event/front, and given that water depth has a far greater effect on them.  How would a fish even know?

    I wonder if a scientific study studying fish behavior with respect barometric pressure and controlling for other factors has been done.  Hmmm.
    I agree with you in principle for game fish, but wonder if the influences may begin further down the food chain...



    Tight Lines,
    Eric Fosbender

    Team Googanator

    2006 Bull Dolphin 22 with 250 Etec
  • Salty Dawg44Salty Dawg44 Homosassa, FLPosts: 1,365 Officer
    The "wrong" barometric pressure would never be a valid reason for me to cancel a day of fishing and stay home and cut the lawn instead!

    MY WORST FEAR......THAT WHEN I DIE MY WIFE WILL SELL ALL MY BOATS & FISHING GEAR FOR WHAT I TOLD HER I PAID FOR IT.......

    I may not always agree with what you say,
    but I will always respect your right to be wrong!
  • brianbbrianb Posts: 2,491 Captain
    The "wrong" barometric pressure would never be a valid reason for me to cancel a day of fishing and stay home and cut the lawn instead!
    Exactly. It's just one factor among many and I think you would need that "before the storm" situation to make a difference. If you are in the middle of one of those summer storms around here getting pounded by rain and about to die from lightning...you WILL catch every kingfish in the ocean I can tell you that. 
  • tankardtankard Posts: 7,030 Admiral

    Well, I can definitely say that bluebird days after a cold front generally suck. Inshore and offshore.

    So there's that.

  • micci_manmicci_man Somewhere in FLPosts: 14,955 AG
    The moon and pressure play a big factor in wildlife movement.
    Common Sense can't be bought, taught or gifted, yet it is one of the few things in life that is free, and most refuse to even attempt to possess it. - Miguel Cervantes
  • Fish HaidFish Haid Posts: 8,417 Admiral
    edited August 2019 #13
    I hear this all the time, but I call BS!  Every 33' of water depth is 15 psi (1 atmosphere).  Atmospheric pressure is around 30" Hg.  Even a large hurricane only drops that pressure by 1" Hg (or 3.3% relative). 

    Now, a fish at 66' down is feeling a water pressure of 2 atmospheres (60" Hg).  A 3' wave (or tide) changes the pressure on the fish by 3/66*60 = 2.7" Hg (about 3x more than the change from a large hurricane).  This happens every few seconds (up and down).  How on earth could a fish possibly sense a tiny change in atmospheric pressure from a normal cold front, which is like 0.1" Hg?
    23895.gif
  • TarponatorTarponator Under a BridgePosts: 18,918 AG
    Uh oh, math!   :)  

    (I agree, by the way, and said as such in an earlier post, sans math.)
  • Fish HaidFish Haid Posts: 8,417 Admiral
    It's not math.  It's Science!
    23895.gif
  • winecooler5winecooler5 delhiPosts: 3 Greenhorn
    I believe falling barometer can help you in fishing as far as my knowledge is concerned. 
  • cortrcortr Posts: 509 Officer
    Some of the best fishing last fall in Louisiana last year was the day when Hurricane Michael was coming ashore in Florida. Falling pressure seems to always help fishing. 
  • WetBanditWetBandit Posts: 124 Deckhand
    Yeah, I hear all the time that falling pressure is good, I was just wondering how much of a drop is significant.  Thanks for all the replies.
  • th19999th19999 Posts: 257 Deckhand
    Maybe before this storm hits the southeast coast of Florida this weekend??!!
  • jcbonejcbone Posts: 57 Deckhand
    All I know is I'm going topwater fishing tomorrow morning before this storm! 
  • Xertyu567Xertyu567 CanadaPosts: 7 Greenhorn
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