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House repipe- best material

dnelsondnelson Posts: 246 Deckhand
im going to repipe my house this (winter) . I have polybutylene and can’t submit my 4 point survey to get the full benefit out of my wind mitigation. What’s the best material? A buddy of mine was talking about a product that expands the end of the pipe and then it returns to its original size after placing a fitting in it.

Replies

  • dnelsondnelson Posts: 246 Deckhand
    I guess it’s just PEX with a different style fitting
  • dave44dave44 Posts: 11,788 AG
    Pex seems to be lasting well. It’s always hard to tell until years later. 
       Qest pipe took around 10 years ? Then it was joints and elbows mostly, and kinks. There was a bunch of places with copper that was too thin too.
       But so far I like pex, it’s only been around maybe, 25 years? Seems to do well. Except really bad well water. ( fittings). But what is immune to that?
  • dnelsondnelson Posts: 246 Deckhand
    I am on well water, but at least I don’t have to worry about the chlorine weakening the PEX. My buddy wants to use cpvc but I hate having all the fittings in the attic and ridge pipe up there that could get stepped on.
  • dave44dave44 Posts: 11,788 AG
    dnelson said:
    I am on well water, but at least I don’t have to worry about the chlorine weakening the PEX. My buddy wants to use cpvc but I hate having all the fittings in the attic and ridge pipe up there that could get stepped on.
    I have seen a lot of Cpvc problems with well water. Acidic I think. Have you had it checked?
  • dnelsondnelson Posts: 246 Deckhand
    No, but I will , thanks 
  • dnelsondnelson Posts: 246 Deckhand
    Looks like it’s around 6.2 on a spa water test kit
  • dave44dave44 Posts: 11,788 AG
    dnelson said:
    Looks like it’s around 6.2 on a spa water test kit
    That’s pretty low. Check your options, we use a ph and alkalinity increaser.
  • pottydocpottydoc Port Saint JoePosts: 4,150 Captain
    edited January 2019 #9
    dnelson said:
    im going to repipe my house this (winter) . I have polybutylene and can’t submit my 4 point survey to get the full benefit out of my wind mitigation. What’s the best material? A buddy of mine was talking about a product that expands the end of the pipe and then it returns to its original size after placing a fitting in it.
    It’s  a pex product. Usually known by its brand name, Upinor . No crimping, it’s put together using barbed fittings and a special tool that expands the pipe. Its pretty much impossible to do wrong. The tool is $300.00 and up depending on size, so it’s not really a DIY product. It’s been around about 15 years or so, we run miles of it (literally) in commercial installations every year. Regular pex went on the market in the ‘70’s, and has had zero issues like getting brittle, pin holes, or any of the other stuff that effects the other avaliable water pipe..If you’re going to DIY it, use regular pex, and crimp fittings. You should be able to rent the crimp tools from a rental place. Pex is absolutely the best product out there for domestic water piping, bar none. If I was repairing or building a house for myself that’s what I would use. CPVC would be a distant second, and I would not even consider copper. 
  • kellerclkellercl Posts: 6,717 Admiral
    My house is 17 years old with pex, wonderful stuff.


    “When you're good at something, you'll tell everyone. When you're great at something, they'll tell you.”

    -Walter Payton
  • NitzeyNitzey Posts: 190 Deckhand
    As a chemical type, I recognize what these materials are.  PEX, for example, is cross-linked polyethylene.  Okay, so what?  One practical advantage of PEX is that it is easy to install.  However, my son had piping for his shop redone, and the professional plumber used polybutylene for the hot water lines.  
  • cadmancadman Home of the Gators Posts: 33,444 AG
    edited January 2019 #12
    I thought polybutylene was not used any more due to the lawsuits and fail rates. I thought most insurance carriers wouldn't cover you if you had Poly.

    Mini Mart Magnate

    I am just here for my amusement. 

  • dnelsondnelson Posts: 246 Deckhand
    ☝🏻☝🏻☝🏻☝🏻
    What he said
  • pottydocpottydoc Port Saint JoePosts: 4,150 Captain
    cadman said:
    I thought polybutylene was not used any more due to the lawsuits and fail rates. I thought most insurance carriers wouldn't cover you if you had Poly.
    Nitzey said:
    As a chemical type, I recognize what these materials are.  PEX, for example, is cross-linked polyethylene.  Okay, so what?  One practical advantage of PEX is that it is easy to install.  However, my son had piping for his shop redone, and the professional plumber used polybutylene for the hot water lines.  
    So, it makes very good water lines. What’s your point? How long ago did your son get his shop repiped. Not one of the vendors I know about even carry polybutylene any more. Are you sure it wasn’t Pex? If it was actually poly, your sons plumber should have his butt kicked. It’s a terrible material for water pipe. But what do I know. I only have over 40 years experience, and a State Plumbing Contractors license. 
  • FletchFletch Merritt Island, FLPosts: 2,465 Moderator
    edited January 2019 #15
    Re-plumbed the last house after copper started failing under the slab - a common problem in our neighborhood where most of the houses were built around the same time (late 70's). Had watched my neighbor bust up tile, cut through slab, repair and re-tile 3 different leaks over a year or so before we had our first leak. Ours was a hot water line leak and you could feel the warm spot on the tile floor. Said no way I was going through what my neighbor went through.

    So I went with Pex and went through the attic. I installed a water distribution panel (I forget offhand who the manufacturer was) in the attic above the garage and ran home runs to every fitting in the house. The only leaks I'd really heard about with Pex occurred around crimps. So I had all my crimps either above the garage ceiling or low on the wall by each fixture. Peace of mind in the event of a leak. Also nice if you did have a leak at a particular fixture, you could simply turn that fixture off at the distribution panel until you had time to deal with it properly. You didn't have to shut the entire house down.

    The only real negative about it was that you had to run the cold water at fixtures for a bit during the summer to evacuate the water that had heated up in the lines in the attic during the day. It was a small price to pay vs the alternative of trying to replace lines under the slab.
    "Ninety percent I'll spend on good times, women and Irish whiskey. The other ten percent, I'll probably waste..."
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    Get Down Fishing Charters - Port Canaveral, Florida
  • kellerclkellercl Posts: 6,717 Admiral
    pottydoc said:
    cadman said:
    I thought polybutylene was not used any more due to the lawsuits and fail rates. I thought most insurance carriers wouldn't cover you if you had Poly.
    Nitzey said:
    As a chemical type, I recognize what these materials are.  PEX, for example, is cross-linked polyethylene.  Okay, so what?  One practical advantage of PEX is that it is easy to install.  However, my son had piping for his shop redone, and the professional plumber used polybutylene for the hot water lines.  
    So, it makes very good water lines. What’s your point? How long ago did your son get his shop repiped. Not one of the vendors I know about even carry polybutylene any more. Are you sure it wasn’t Pex? If it was actually poly, your sons plumber should have his butt kicked. It’s a terrible material for water pipe. But what do I know. I only have over 40 years experience, and a State Plumbing Contractors license. 
    So you are saying you have laid a lot of pipe in your day?


    “When you're good at something, you'll tell everyone. When you're great at something, they'll tell you.”

    -Walter Payton
  • Turner River TerrorTurner River Terror Posts: 8,114 Admiral
    edited January 2019 #17
    Best time to Lay Pipe is when your young.
    Wait till your old and your fittings start to fail...
    I just about laid the Keystone Pipeline  in Miami back in the day....winning..
    Killin and Grillin :grin
  • pottydocpottydoc Port Saint JoePosts: 4,150 Captain
    kellercl said:
    pottydoc said:
    cadman said:
    I thought polybutylene was not used any more due to the lawsuits and fail rates. I thought most insurance carriers wouldn't cover you if you had Poly.
    Nitzey said:
    As a chemical type, I recognize what these materials are.  PEX, for example, is cross-linked polyethylene.  Okay, so what?  One practical advantage of PEX is that it is easy to install.  However, my son had piping for his shop redone, and the professional plumber used polybutylene for the hot water lines.  
    So, it makes very good water lines. What’s your point? How long ago did your son get his shop repiped. Not one of the vendors I know about even carry polybutylene any more. Are you sure it wasn’t Pex? If it was actually poly, your sons plumber should have his butt kicked. It’s a terrible material for water pipe. But what do I know. I only have over 40 years experience, and a State Plumbing Contractors license. 
    So you are saying you have laid a lot of pipe in your day?
    I cannot tell a lie. There has been quite a lot. The amount has slowed down over the years, though. :)
  • dnelsondnelson Posts: 246 Deckhand
    Started the repipe, a house full of vaulted ceilings is quite challenging, feel like I was hit by a car from sitting on trusses.😀
  • mindyabinessmindyabiness Posts: 6,506 Admiral
    dnelson said:
    Started the repipe, a house full of vaulted ceilings is quite challenging, feel like I was hit by a car from sitting on trusses.😀
    Summer is right around the corner..... :#:#
    Arguing with idiots is like playing chess with a pigeon... No matter how good you are, the bird is going to crap on the board and strut around like it won anyway.
  • NoeetticaNoeettica Posts: 2,300 Captain
    Some jobs end up being  "Hybrid" Some PEX Some CPVC  there are some tight spots you have to thread in 1/2" OD pex ...
    want to know about my Gheenoes Go Here

    http://www.noeettica.com/
  • YnotjaxYnotjax Posts: 349 Deckhand
    One question I have I had my house repiped with CVPC from the meter all the way to all the faucets etc. 

    when the Plummer runs the pipe from the meter to the house what is typically used before getting into the distribution panel?

     I did have my house totally redone with CVPC in 1999 the copper pipe was springing leaks all over and the house was only 12 years old.  

    I have no issues, is what I used ok?  

    Just last year or so neighbors had CVPC replacement as well and very happy.  Wondering if all about the company that replaced it and workmanship.

    20 years with no issues.

  • pottydocpottydoc Port Saint JoePosts: 4,150 Captain
    CPVC is a good product. You have no worries. Usually, regular pvc is run from the meter or pump to the house, but CPVC will be fine
  • Flats2blueFlats2blue Posts: 278 Deckhand
    Good luck with the repipe.  I the Qest $%#% stuff in a house I bought.  Started springing leaks at the elbows.  I redid the whole house with CPVC.  That was about 12 years ago.  Having a raised home (flood plain near river) made it a bit easier to access.   No problems since.  
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