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Service dog bites someone in the workplace????

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  • johnpowersjohnpowers BayPosts: 2,898 Captain
    Resinhead said:
    Getting a service dog is this easy.


    I saw one that said “Himalayan search and rescue “. 
     It was on a dachshund. 

  • conchydongconchydong Pompano BeachPosts: 8,046 Admiral
    edited January 2019 #33
    Any dog that snapped or bit someone in a work place should be removed/replaced IMO unless it was a guard dog protecting property. If it is a true service dog, as others have said, it is highly unlikely it would bite someone. You should consult a lawyer and deal with this ASAP. God forbid, if it bit someone hard enough to cause serious injury. 

    FYI, Had to edit some of it to make it fit.


    Department of Justice seal

    U.S. Department of Justice
    Civil Rights Division
    Disability Rights Section

    ADA 2010 Revised Requirements

    esign (2010 Standards).

    Overview

    This publication provides guidance on the term “service animal” and the service animal provisions in the Department’s new regulations.

    • Beginning on March 15, 2011, only dogs are recognized as service animals under titles II and III of the ADA.
    • A service animal is a dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for a person with a disability.
    • Generally, title II and title III entities must permit service animals to accompany people with disabilities in all areas where members of the public are allowed to go.

    How “Service Animal” Is Defined

    Service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, reminding a person with mental illness to take prescribed medications, calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack, or performing other duties. Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task a dog has been trained to provide must be directly related to the person’s disability. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA.

    This definition does not affect or limit the broader definition of “assistance animal” under the Fair Housing Act or the broader definition of “service animal” under the Air Carrier Access Act.

    Some State and local laws also define service animal more broadly than the ADA does. Information about such laws can be obtained from the State attorney general’s office.

    Where Service Animals Are Allowed

    Under the ADA, State and local governments, businesses, and nonprofit organizations that serve the public generally must allow service animals to accompany people with disabilities in all areas of the facility where the public is normally allowed to go. For example, in a hospital it would be inappropriate to exclude a service animal from areas such as patient rooms, clinics, cafeterias, or examination rooms. However, it may be appropriate to exclude a service animal from operating rooms or burn units where the animal’s presence may compromise a sterile environment.

    Service Animals Must Be Under Control

    Under the ADA, service animals must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered, unless these devices interfere with the service animal’s work or the individual’s disability prevents using these devices. In that case, the individual must maintain control of the animal through voice, signal, or other effective controls.

    Inquiries, Exclusions, Charges, and Other Specific Rules Related to Service Animals

    • When it is not obvious what service an animal provides, only limited inquiries are allowed. Staff may ask two questions: (1) is the dog a service animal required because of a disability, and (2) what work or task has the dog been trained to perform. Staff cannot ask about the person’s disability, require medical documentation, require a special identification card or training documentation for the dog, or ask that the dog demonstrate its ability to perform the work or task.
    • Allergies and fear of dogs are not valid reasons for denying access or refusing service to people using service animals. When a person who is allergic to dog dander and a person who uses a service animal must spend time in the same room or facility, for example, in a school classroom or at a homeless shelter, they both should be accommodated by assigning them, if possible, to different locations within the room or different rooms in the facility.
    • A person with a disability cannot be asked to remove his service animal from the premises unless: (1) the dog is out of control and the handler does not take effective action to control it or (2) the dog is not housebroken. When there is a legitimate reason to ask that a service animal be removed, staff must offer the person with the disability the opportunity to obtain goods or services without the animal’s presence.
    • Establishments that sell or prepare food must allow service animals in public areas even if state or local health codes prohibit animals on the premises.
    • People with disabilities who use service animals cannot be isolated from other patrons, treated less favorably than other patrons, or charged fees that are not charged to other patrons without animals. In addition, if a business requires a deposit or fee to be paid by patrons with pets, it must waive the charge for service animals.
    • If a business such as a hotel normally charges guests for damage that they cause, a customer with a disability may also be charged for damage caused by himself or his service animal.
    • Staff are not required to provide care or food for a service animal.

     

    For more information about the ADA, please visit our website or call our toll-free number.

    ADA Website

    www.ADA.gov

    To receive e-mail notifications when new ADA information is available,

    visit the ADA Website’s home page and click the link near the top of the middle column.


    ADA Information Line

    800-514-0301 (Voice) and 800-514-0383 (TTY)

    24 hours a day to order publications by mail.

    M-W, F 9:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m., Th 12:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. (Eastern Time)

    to speak with an ADA Specialist. All calls are confidential.

    For persons with disabilities, this publication is available in alternate formats.

    Duplication of this document is encouraged. July 2011

     

    PDF Version of this Document

     

    July 12, 2011





    “Everyone behaves badly--given the chance.”
    ― Ernest Hemingway

  • surfmansurfman WC FLPosts: 5,974 Admiral
    what if it bites a child? is that a possibility?
    Tight Lines, Steve
    My posts are my opinion only.

    Be thankful we're not getting all the government we're paying for.  Will Rogers
  • MRichardsonMRichardson Posts: 10,455 AG
    A child is still a human, so if that happens I think the same rules apply.
    I have never seen live bones, but I know that they are often used by rich people to decorate the interior.
  • surfmansurfman WC FLPosts: 5,974 Admiral
    I know but children get better press.
    Tight Lines, Steve
    My posts are my opinion only.

    Be thankful we're not getting all the government we're paying for.  Will Rogers
  • CountryBumpkinCountryBumpkin Fla. Piney WoodsPosts: 1,833 Captain
    edited January 2019 #37
    Any chance this is a Diabetes Assist Dog? One trained to detect body scent changes in person whose blood sugar drops?

    Coworker got his son one this year and everything was great at first then he said as dog has become accustomed to the new house and the boys schoolroom (goes to a private school with him), it has become territorial and wants to challenge any person it doesn't think should come into whatever area they are in. So far no biting but does display aggressive behavior.


  • MRichardsonMRichardson Posts: 10,455 AG
    Lol, diabetes assist dog and the ref above to a service dog to remind you to take you meds on time.. I need a service dog to remind me to do stuff.  Do they bite you on the **** when it's time to inject insulin, take  your pills, or change the bearings on a trailer?  That would be cool.
    I have never seen live bones, but I know that they are often used by rich people to decorate the interior.
  • surfmansurfman WC FLPosts: 5,974 Admiral
    Some people need all the help they can get.
    Tight Lines, Steve
    My posts are my opinion only.

    Be thankful we're not getting all the government we're paying for.  Will Rogers
  • Jack HexterJack Hexter New Port RicheyPosts: 5,105 Moderator
    MRichardson, your satirical comment about Diabetic Assist Dogs needs to be reconsidered.  Diabetic Alert Dogs are considered Service Dogs under the ADA.
    Please check the link

  • ANUMBER1ANUMBER1 Posts: 11,944 AG
    edited January 2019 #41
    .
    I am glad to only be a bird hunter with bird dogs...being a shooter or dog handler or whatever other niche exists to separate appears to generate far too much about which to worry.
  • CountryBumpkinCountryBumpkin Fla. Piney WoodsPosts: 1,833 Captain
    Actually the dog paws you, like he wants you to do the ole shake hands trick, when he senses your glucose level is way out of whack.

    But most of them seem to be poodle mixes, he got a labradoodle.
    Labrador for it's good nose and the poodles are used because they say their fur is less allergic to almost anyone with dog allergies.

    I told him the poodle disposition is the problem, as I have seen some nasty acting ones.

  • SaltygatorvetSaltygatorvet TallahasseePosts: 5,808 Admiral
    Actually the dog paws you, like he wants you to do the ole shake hands trick, when he senses your glucose level is way out of whack.

    But most of them seem to be poodle mixes, he got a labradoodle.
    Labrador for it's good nose and the poodles are used because they say their fur is less allergic to almost anyone with dog allergies.

    I told him the poodle disposition is the problem, as I have seen some nasty acting ones.

    Any nasty poodle you encountered was probably a toy or mini poodle. Usually standard poodles are used in doodle breeds. Standard poodles are actually very smart and friendly. They are used as pointers for upland bird hunting. Underrated breed imho
    You should have been here yesterday
  • CountryBumpkinCountryBumpkin Fla. Piney WoodsPosts: 1,833 Captain
    Yes.......rich women with small poodles they have spoiled......that terrorize (not really) visitors or passerby's. :)
  • Jack HexterJack Hexter New Port RicheyPosts: 5,105 Moderator
  • surfmansurfman WC FLPosts: 5,974 Admiral

    Obviously a well trained service dog is invaluable. Unfortunately there are many people out there ready to game the system and take advantage of it. I don’t like whiners or people that take advantage of others. If this dog is not trained and certified as a service animal then it is nothing more than a pet. It only takes a few to ruin it for everyone.


    Tight Lines, Steve
    My posts are my opinion only.

    Be thankful we're not getting all the government we're paying for.  Will Rogers
  • AC ManAC Man Posts: 6,638 Admiral
    Uh, I'm diabetic. Fortunately not type 1 but I don't need a dog to tell me to take my meds.
  • 1982mako2241982mako224 Posts: 412 Deckhand
    The dog has been banned.  The employee took it in stride likely because he realized the liability after the dog's first incident.
  • AaronCannonAaronCannon Pinellas County Posts: 899 Officer
    Good call, im allowed to bring a dog to work, but no way id risk it if she showed any shitheaded tendancies.
    The rifle itself has no moral stature, since it has no will of its own. Naturally, it may be used by evil men for evil purposes, but there are more good men than evil, and while the latter cannot be persuaded to the path of righteousness by propaganda, they can certainly be corrected by good men with rifles.
    Jeff Cooper
  • fins4mefins4me Posts: 14,487 AG
    The whole service and support animal thing has gotten completely out of hand. A dog to assist a blind person  or other "essential "service is understandable but dogs and other animals are suddenly being trudged along everywhere.  Crap in store floors and the little  beasts riding in grocery carts is simply unacceptable and should be stopped.

    I was in Home Depot the other day and there was dog crap all over an aisle. 
    ALLISON XB 21,, MERCURY 300 Opti Max Pro Series (Slightly Modified) You can't catch me!!!
    "Today is MINE"
  • dave44dave44 Posts: 12,222 AG
    fins4me said:
    The whole service and support animal thing has gotten completely out of hand. A dog to assist a blind person  or other "essential "service is understandable but dogs and other animals are suddenly being trudged along everywhere.  Crap in store floors and the little  beasts riding in grocery carts is simply unacceptable and should be stopped.

    I was in Home Depot the other day and there was dog crap all over an aisle. 
       It’s funny you said that. I’ve seen a lot of dogs in stores the last few years but last week was the first time I saw liquified dirt pickles in a Home Depot.
        It’s not a good trend.
  • surfmansurfman WC FLPosts: 5,974 Admiral
    People think you should love their fur ball like they do, people are morons.
    Tight Lines, Steve
    My posts are my opinion only.

    Be thankful we're not getting all the government we're paying for.  Will Rogers
  • tankardtankard Posts: 7,031 Admiral
    Actually the dog paws you, like he wants you to do the ole shake hands trick, when he senses your glucose level is way out of whack.

    But most of them seem to be poodle mixes, he got a labradoodle.
    Labrador for it's good nose and the poodles are used because they say their fur is less allergic to almost anyone with dog allergies.

    I told him the poodle disposition is the problem, as I have seen some nasty acting ones.

    Any nasty poodle you encountered was probably a toy or mini poodle. Usually standard poodles are used in doodle breeds. Standard poodles are actually very smart and friendly. They are used as pointers for upland bird hunting. Underrated breed imho


    Meh.

    My friend has an Aussiedoodle, kind of a stupid dog. Jumpy and barky.

    Growing up we had a standard poodle. That was the single most stupid dog I have ever encountered. Never got housebroken, wouldn't respond when called, got into everything.

    I don't buy this nonsense that poodles or poodle mixes are exceptionally smart, or friendly for that matter.

  • tankardtankard Posts: 7,031 Admiral

    And I agree 100% that the "service animal" thing has gotten WAY out of hand.

    I'll occasionally take my dog to a known dog-friendly establishment with a patio, but she doesn't need to go everywhere with me every time.

  • SaltygatorvetSaltygatorvet TallahasseePosts: 5,808 Admiral
    tankard said:
    Actually the dog paws you, like he wants you to do the ole shake hands trick, when he senses your glucose level is way out of whack.

    But most of them seem to be poodle mixes, he got a labradoodle.
    Labrador for it's good nose and the poodles are used because they say their fur is less allergic to almost anyone with dog allergies.

    I told him the poodle disposition is the problem, as I have seen some nasty acting ones.

    Any nasty poodle you encountered was probably a toy or mini poodle. Usually standard poodles are used in doodle breeds. Standard poodles are actually very smart and friendly. They are used as pointers for upland bird hunting. Underrated breed imho


    Meh.

    My friend has an Aussiedoodle, kind of a stupid dog. Jumpy and barky.

    Growing up we had a standard poodle. That was the single most stupid dog I have ever encountered. Never got housebroken, wouldn't respond when called, got into everything.

    I don't buy this nonsense that poodles or poodle mixes are exceptionally smart, or friendly for that matter.

    Dogs only know what they are taught. My guess is the dog had a bad teacher. They are considered one of the smartest breeds by people that know.
    You should have been here yesterday
  • SaltygatorvetSaltygatorvet TallahasseePosts: 5,808 Admiral
    edited January 2019 #56
    tankard said:

    And I agree 100% that the "service animal" thing has gotten WAY out of hand.

    I'll occasionally take my dog to a known dog-friendly establishment with a patio, but she doesn't need to go everywhere with me every time.

    How is taking your dog to a restaurant different from someone taking a dog to Home Depot. HD allows people to bring dogs ( as does bass pro) . Any “well behaved “ dog, doesn’t have to be support ( different from service ) dog. How do you know that person isn’t trying to socialize a rescue dog. How do you know that persons dog has to be with them everywhere. Seems like you like to take your dog out, but don’t want to extend the same courtesy to others. And  If you don’t like it, you can take it up with the store.
    You should have been here yesterday
  • tankardtankard Posts: 7,031 Admiral

    Don't put words in my mouth, Mr. Know It All.

    When I take my dog out, she remains OUTSIDE.

    There is a difference. I don't need her to accompany me into stores, etc.

    Truth is, I'd rather leave her home most of the time, but she really loves the  attention so it is a treat for her when I do take her out, and there are very specific places I take her, that are not only dog friendly but actively encourage customers to bring dogs.


  • fins4mefins4me Posts: 14,487 AG
    For some reason todays society seems  confused about what constitutes a pet and family.  I have dogs, always have had but I somehow seem able to part with them for a few moments while I go out in public.

    If you love your critter regardless of what it is then good for you,,, the rest of us may not be as fond of it as you are and would prefer not having it drool, crap and shed all over public places.


    ALLISON XB 21,, MERCURY 300 Opti Max Pro Series (Slightly Modified) You can't catch me!!!
    "Today is MINE"
  • SaltygatorvetSaltygatorvet TallahasseePosts: 5,808 Admiral
    tankard said:

    Don't put words in my mouth, Mr. Know It All.

    When I take my dog out, she remains OUTSIDE.

    There is a difference. I don't need her to accompany me into stores, etc.

    Truth is, I'd rather leave her home most of the time, but she really loves the  attention so it is a treat for her when I do take her out, and there are very specific places I take her, that are not only dog friendly but actively encourage customers to bring dogs.


    The same it true for Home Depot. The same may be true for the person you have a problem with. Typical, it’s ok for me , but not you. Eye roll
    You should have been here yesterday
  • tankardtankard Posts: 7,031 Admiral

    Again, weirdo, don't put words in my mouth. If you're going to accuse me of hypocrisy have some evidence.

    When the hell did I mention having a problem with a person??

    **** is with that? All said was I agree the service dog thing has gotten out of hand.

    I don't mind seeing dogs out and about, at all. I love dogs. But seeing them in shopping carts at Publix is a bit much.

  • cadmancadman Home of the Gators Posts: 34,337 AG
    I don't have an issue with people taking their dogs with them as long as the dog behaves and doesn't make a mess. I tell people who ask if their dog can come in that it is fine since most dogs are better behaved than most people. 

    If the dog makes a mess I expect the person to clean it up. I have never had a dog make a mess yet in the store. We have had three customers over the years who were drunk and pissed on the floor. Had a couple attempt to have sex in the beer cooler. Never had an issue with a dog yet. 

    Mini Mart Magnate

    I am just here for my amusement. 

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