Im this close to calling it

FlatsMatt96FlatsMatt96 ChuluotaPosts: 1,142 Officer
I am so tired of sitting and sitting day and night in an irregular pattern to keep on getting a whole lot of nothing. Everytime I see it I dont see jack! I dont know what I am doing wrong but I have plenty of deer on camera but none in shooting hours or showing up during shooting hours! Plus I havent seen any of the bucks for about a 10 days so I think its safe to say they have been taken by some lucky SOB. I am so close to calling it quits for my property and packing my feeder and stand. I had spike lee come out at 8:30am recently but thats it! I dont even wanna take a spike. Im at wits end. 
If youre going to burn a bridge, dont just burn it, use C4 and make a statement. 
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Replies

  • hunterjwhunterjw Posts: 404 Deckhand
    Didn’t you just start hunting a few weeks ago?

    I think you will be better served hunting the nearest public land.  It will provide access to more property and you will learn more and have the ability to move around.  Currently you are hunting 5 acres and hunting a feeder not deer.  If acorns are falling they will have more interest in that.  

    I think you will also find hunting more enjoyable on a bigger piece of property.  You can move around, see and hunt different areas etc.  You will also learn to hunt deer in a rather pressured environment which will make you a better hunter.  If I was stuck to hunting my backyard I’d probably lose interest as well.  
    "He who hoots with the owls at night will not soar with the eagles at dawn"

  • Florida BullfrogFlorida Bullfrog Posts: 2,613 Captain
    edited October 2018 #3
    hunterjw said:
    Didn’t you just start hunting a few weeks ago?

    I think you will be better served hunting the nearest public land.  It will provide access to more property and you will learn more and have the ability to move around.  Currently you are hunting 5 acres and hunting a feeder not deer.  If acorns are falling they will have more interest in that.  

    I think you will also find hunting more enjoyable on a bigger piece of property.  You can move around, see and hunt different areas etc.  You will also learn to hunt deer in a rather pressured environment which will make you a better hunter.  If I was stuck to hunting my backyard I’d probably lose interest as well.  
    I agree with this. You're hunting deer in your back yard in the wide open where they aren't going to feel comfortable showing themselves in hunting season. Its almost like fishing in a retention pond or hunting in the city park. Sure there's probably a couple of fish around in the retention pond but its not the same as going out into the lake. I doubt someone took the deer. You just don't have access to a good place to hunt. The deer just don't want to be there right now.

    Have any interest in varmint hunting? There were years I didn't have access to good deer land and I took up **** and coyote hunting. You can hunt either at night with a light (except that coons have to be with a .22LR or a .410 unless you get a nusciance night hunting permit). Bait you up some varmints in that yard of yours and set up on them. Then learn how to skin and tan their hides. I bet a place like yours will have varmints out the wazoo. 
  • ChonggChongg Posts: 711 Officer
    edited October 2018 #4
    Agree with first poster. If you're putting that much time in, it's time to go explore somewhere else. I'd still keep that feeder running, because you could get some daylight activity come late season.

    Also, and I mean this in a constructive way, but I think you need an attitude adjustment. Don't even start thinking about quitting. Deer hunting in Florida isn't easy, and it takes time to figure out.

    Adjust your expectations, as in don't expect to shoot a deer, let alone a decent buck, without experience and time in the woods under your belt.

    Don't compare yourself to others you know or see on social media. You're only seeing a small part of their hunt; you don't know the circumstances of their hunt or how much work they, or someone else, put in to make it happen. 

    Deer hunting isn't just about killing deer. It's a huge part of it, but try to enjoy the other things: Learning the woods, learning the animals, just being out in nature. Savor the small victories, like seeing deer in daylight, and learn from your mistakes. You're going to fail in this endeavor. If that bothers you too much, you're probably not long for this sport. 

  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 1,685 Captain
    Patience grasshopper.  Great advice!  Get yourself on some public land.  I can tell, you're gonna like it.
  • binellishtrbinellishtr Posts: 8,797 Admiral
    maybe write or call FWC and complain, they will close it down next yr for you probably...hmmm
  • bowhunter4lifebowhunter4life Posts: 1,312 Officer
    maybe write or call FWC and complain, they will close it down next yr for you probably...hmmm
    Very inspirational for the new hunter!..#doomandgloom 
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 11,204 AG
    I'd start limiting your time there at the house to 1hr before sunset and 90 minutes in the morning.   You'll go mad sitting in that thing all day and night.    
    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.
  • bowhunter4lifebowhunter4life Posts: 1,312 Officer
    Type your commentTo the op, valid points made already. I would keep your private setup going until you get a good pattern of deer coming in daylight hours on your cameras. Start hunting public land also, it’s a lot more fun trying to figure it out on a big piece of land and you will learn more. I have hunted backyards in the northeast and it can get boring. Mix it up , and don’t be afraid to try new things..... good luck!
  • arrowheadhuntarrowheadhunt Posts: 204 Deckhand
    Hunting is a challenge. There is no immediate gratification by way of a kill.

    I like the challenge. Hunting is also a year round activity for me. You can hunt anytime, you just can't kill until the season.

    I did not really start enjoying hunting until I was 40 years old. Younger then that, I would get bored, and could not focus on and enjoy the little things.

    One thing I do know, when you get frustrated, just take a break. A week, a month, a year. If it is in your blood, you will come back to it.

    Also I know more people that quit hunting then I know hunters. It is not for everyone. 
  • Rich MRich M Posts: 1,326 Officer
    Leave the feeder out but go play somewhere else until you day light sign - probably mid-December.

    Stop walking back there every chance you get - that is what is hurting you.  Stay out for 3 weeks and see what happens.
  • Scottb226Scottb226 Posts: 235 Deckhand
    Ditch the feeder. That's boring hunting anyway if you even call it hunting. Get out and scout on some public land. Most of the fun in hunting is the challenge and work leading up to the hunt, not necessarily the hunt itself. It's much more rewarding when you're able to harvest a non baited deer too
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 11,204 AG
    @FlatsMatt96 i wouldn't take much of my advice anyway, the past two years we have hunted we've only shot one doe.   

    I've passed on a very juvenile 6 point last year, my son shot and missed a doe last year.   We hunt private land up in SC and we have had hunts for 3 days where we never saw one deer.   It can be frustrating.    But then during the rut i watched a fat bodied 8 point running after a doe, nose to the ground at 1pm.   There was no shot he was full on running her down.  If you ever get into an area with low pressured deer during the rut it's insane.   
    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.
  • tampaspicertampaspicer Posts: 399 Deckhand
    No reason to give up hunting. You might want to give your backyard a break. As others have suggested try hunting a WMA. Deer hunting in Florida can be tuff. I grew up hunting in Florida and killed many deer in Florida. I wanted the chance to hunt bigger and better quality deer so I started hunting in Georgia. I wish I would have done that many years before I did. Georgia is a much better state for deer hunting. It's not just the quality of deer but offers better chances to you as a hunter. I also hunted South Carolina for a couple of years and wish I had never stopped hunting there (only left because the club president was a not so nice gentleman) because that state was geared towards the hunter. The herd where I was hunting at was unreal. Killed my biggest deer there too. If Florida isn't to your liking try one of those two states out. 
  • bswivbswiv Posts: 7,542 Admiral
    Lot's of good advice there.

    And let me point out something from the past......as in 50+ years ago when dad finally took me for something other than a dove hunt. He did not hunt deer because he had no interest in running dogs and to still hunt was generally not very successful.

    This was way before climbers, reliable feeders, cameras and a whole host of other things we take for granted now. 

    There really was not a lot of expectation of success for most folks. This being the case there had better be something else that mattered, some other metric that counted as "success" besides a deer.

    And mind you.....a mature 8 or even something bigger was more than news.

    Which takes me back to something a number of folks have mentioned, public land. While it has it's downsides the fact that there is more of it to wander about on, more diversity of vegetation, more......well.....just more to look at and enjoy.....that is part of success even when no deer shows.

    Sorry......I got long with that, and too, wandered about a bit. But like someone else said....don't give up.....just expand your definition of success.

    The picture was taken looking down one of the thinned rows of a 22 year old stand of slash with a few loblolly mixed in. If sitting over such a sight as the sun comes up is not success I am not sure what is.
  • ANUMBER1ANUMBER1 Posts: 10,512 AG
    Nice bswiv!

    And since you mentioned dog hunting, I might add (not just the thrill of a good race) but the fellowship and good friends made while pursuing a common interest, bonds that live on well past hunting season..
    I am glad to only be a bird hunter with bird dogs...being a shooter or dog handler or whatever other niche exists to separate appears to generate far too much about which to worry.
  • mindyabinessmindyabiness Posts: 5,334 Admiral
    Perhaps you should consider pursuing another hobby, what about tennis, or figure skating?
    Give that some thought.





    Youll be back in the stand before you know it.
    Arguing with idiots is like playing chess with a pigeon... No matter how good you are, the bird is going to crap on the board and strut around like it won anyway.
  • tampaspicertampaspicer Posts: 399 Deckhand
    ANUMBER1 said:
    Nice bswiv!

    And since you mentioned dog hunting, I might add (not just the thrill of a good race) but the fellowship and good friends made while pursuing a common interest, bonds that live on well past hunting season..
    That's what I grew up doing as far as deer hunting. Killed my 1st deer in front of the dogs. Those were some fun times and you are correct about the fellowship. Next best thing to the hunt was lunch at some intersection in the woods. Then those big meals at night back at camp. 
  • swampwalkerswampwalker Posts: 2,359 Captain
    I love public land hunting. Tried a couple of small private properties back years ago. I guess I need elbow room so I can get away from the city when I want to. The habitat diversity is great and as mentioned, sun rises and sets are just better in the woods! I hunt all methods and seasons and still love dog hunting and the comraderie at camp as well. On public land you can run into the occasional jerk, but for the most part public land hunters are "my people". You get to know them and they you. Rarely do we have multi deer kill seasons - but when you get a deer, it's the best!
    The original - "Renaissance Redneck"
  • FlatsMatt96FlatsMatt96 ChuluotaPosts: 1,142 Officer
    Thanks guys, I really appreciate all the advice and support. There are great people on here. I only get frustrated because I have been ruined. What I am about to say is going to sound very egotistical and it is not meant too. I am humble and have respect. I have always been very lucky. In just about everything I do ive been very very lucky. When I first went hunting I was using a 12 gauge loaded with buckshot and dropped 4 hogs with one shot my very first time hunting. The second time I went hunting I dropped a 150 lb sow. All of my success has been very immediate because I get lucky. So that has ruined me and so when I dont immediatley do well at something I get frustrated. Again I know it sounds egotistical but I really am not a pompous person. So I think thats why I am frustrated with this sport. I absolutely love it and its fun but its frustrating. I am sure we all know someone who gets lucky a lot. 
    If youre going to burn a bridge, dont just burn it, use C4 and make a statement. 
  • Reel TealReel Teal Posts: 3,850 Captain
    You're trying to kill a deer in the backyard. I wouldn't get too worked up over it and just be happy if it works out. Just wait until it takes you 3 years to pull a quota in an area you've spent a couple years scouting and some guy climbs a tree 30 yards from you. That's frustrating. 
  • Rich MRich M Posts: 1,326 Officer
    Teal just made a great point - some guys put years into making a hunt - one hunt. 

    There are folks who put in for quota points for multiple years to say go to Iowa, out west, or even get a decent permit here in FL and then something goes wrong.  Some guy shows up too close, there was a forest fire, bad weather, etc.  Tons of variables. 

    Don't let the instant success with pigs cloud your vision.  Or the need for instant gratification.  Takes time to figure this stuff out.

    You've got a feeder in your back yard.  The deer will start coming back in before the end of the season.  Maybe you can drop a couple hundred bucks and get a trail cam that sends pictures to another trail cam?  That way you can satisfy the need to know and still keep your scent away from your stand.
  • Big MakBig Mak Posts: 2,485 Captain
    Enjoy the ride! Getting there is half the fun. The morning coffee, the missed shots, the hard work, the BS sessions, the razzing, the good/bad meals, the lousy weather.... Those are the things that make the occasional successes sweeter. 

  • awayaway Posts: 328 Deckhand
    Where do your deer come from? Is there a path for deer to get to your feeder without being in the wide open?

    If you are relying on them to cross an open field to get to your property it's very unlikely they will do it in shooting light.
  • swampwalkerswampwalker Posts: 2,359 Captain
    Flattsmat don't depend on lady luck in hunting. She's so very fickle. Anything that breathes to survive will have amazing adaptive instincts and will vary routine to exist. We've all had lucky shots - we just don't hang our hats on them. Take a breath, let the animals do their thing and just be prepared. Been some great suggestions and info on here. The rest is up to you. BTW - Vegas is full of folks waiting on luck to visit as they lose their shirt. The deer woods are full of folks that prepare and take what they're presented. Hunting is hunting....
    The original - "Renaissance Redneck"
  • FlatsMatt96FlatsMatt96 ChuluotaPosts: 1,142 Officer
    @away They do and did come in across an open 30-40 yard stretch to the feeder which has a few low hanging branches. I just sprayed some doe scent for Shitaki and giggles to see if anything would stir. Ive stopped going out there so much, I have been out maybe 2-3 times in the past two weeks for a couple minutes. Since ive done that I have gotten a herd of 8 does and a couple shooter bucks coming back. 
    If youre going to burn a bridge, dont just burn it, use C4 and make a statement. 
  • FlatsMatt96FlatsMatt96 ChuluotaPosts: 1,142 Officer
    @swampwalker Youre right I shouldnt rely on her. I have been able to rely on her so much that I got used to it. I have taken some of the advice and info on this thread and am going to give it a try. Such as not going out there as often and not messing with it too much. They seem to have gotten used to the feeder and stand so I think if I give it a bit more time alone, they will start to show up at the "right" times. 
    If youre going to burn a bridge, dont just burn it, use C4 and make a statement. 
  • awayaway Posts: 328 Deckhand
    Try moving the feeder in to thicker cover. 
  • FlatsMatt96FlatsMatt96 ChuluotaPosts: 1,142 Officer
    @away There is none except for a semi fallen tree right on the border of my property.
    If youre going to burn a bridge, dont just burn it, use C4 and make a statement. 
  • Rich MRich M Posts: 1,326 Officer
    @away They do and did come in across an open 30-40 yard stretch to the feeder which has a few low hanging branches. I just sprayed some doe scent for Shitaki and giggles to see if anything would stir. Ive stopped going out there so much, I have been out maybe 2-3 times in the past two weeks for a couple minutes. Since ive done that I have gotten a herd of 8 does and a couple shooter bucks coming back. 
    You've got plenty of deer - figure out how to check the cam without spreading much scent  and get them timed - then hit it on the right wind.
  • Florida BullfrogFlorida Bullfrog Posts: 2,613 Captain


    The above is the kind of back yard where you might catch a deer during the day. That’s about 200 yards behind my house. The wiregrass to left blocks their view of the house so they don’t feel exposed when they come out. 

    Right by my house where there is an open lawn that I keep mowed, they walk it at night and rarely in the middle of the day when no one is home. Yes, they know when we’re home and when we’re not. I have no realistic chance of seeing one during the day during hunting season in the open lawn. 

    I still say that if you can’t find a place on your property that’s quiet and secluded, you might as well hang it up. Take up varmint hunting at night and go hunt deer in the WMAs. 
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