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Would you dare?

CyclistCyclist Posts: 23,346 AG
Open her up and try and hit 130mph?
It’s a 16.5-liter straight-six with “just” 250 hp and 3,000 lb/ft (4,063 Nm) - yes, that’s not a typo. With wheels the size of those you’ll find on an ice cream cart, it’s easy to see why setting off in this car is something that requires a lot of skill and finesse. Unless, of course, you like to do as Mike and pull a little burnout each time.

The car is said to be able to reach 127 mph (204 km/h), but it would take a brave man to actually test those figures. And a brave woman as well, since the car requires two people to operate.









Replies

  • ferris1248ferris1248 Posts: 9,647 Moderator
    That's pretty cool. You'd have to have some big cojones to take that thing to 127 mph.

    "That which is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow. That is the whole of the law. The rest is commentary."

    Rabbi Hillel (c20 BCE)

  • surfmansurfman WC FLPosts: 5,982 Admiral
    Looks dangerous for sure, would hate to get my pants leg caught in that chain.
    Tight Lines, Steve
    My posts are my opinion only.

    Be thankful we're not getting all the government we're paying for.  Will Rogers
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 13,534 AG
    Nope, I would not drive something that sketchy looking over 20.   
    Like is like a Helicopter.  I do not know how to operate a Helicopter  
  • dragon baitdragon bait Posts: 9,254 Admiral
  • NoeetticaNoeettica Posts: 2,300 Captain
    I would drive that thing all day long !!!
    want to know about my Gheenoes Go Here

    http://www.noeettica.com/
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 23,346 AG
    I have driven some old cars (the oldest 1901 olds) but never more than 25 max. The going is not so bad, its the stopping that will get ya!
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 23,346 AG
    edited October 2018 #8
    Another before its time auto. They say it would cruise at 75mph. Was for sale at 1,250,00$.




    1911 Lozier 5-Passenger Torpedo Touring

    Fully restored in the 1960's.

    From its inception in 1900 to its demise in 1915, Lozier never produced more than 600 cars in any given year. Lozier was one of the most expensive cars available in America, with the Model 51 Touring costing a staggering $5,500. Like many other firms, Lozier was engaged in racing. In 1907, with Ralph Mulford at the helm, the marque set a number of 24-hour records and won a number of races. Lozier continued its success with Mulford, winning the Elgin Road Race in 1910, the Vanderbilt Cup in Savannah in 1911, and taking 2nd in the first Indianapolis 500.



  • MGTeacherMGTeacher South GaPosts: 1,800 Captain
    Cyclist said:
    Another before its time auto. They say it would cruise at 75mph. Was for sale at 1,250,00$.




    1911 Lozier 5-Passenger Torpedo Touring

    Fully restored in the 1960's.

    From its inception in 1900 to its demise in 1915, Lozier never produced more than 600 cars in any given year. Lozier was one of the most expensive cars available in America, with the Model 51 Touring costing a staggering $5,500. Like many other firms, Lozier was engaged in racing. In 1907, with Ralph Mulford at the helm, the marque set a number of 24-hour records and won a number of races. Lozier continued its success with Mulford, winning the Elgin Road Race in 1910, the Vanderbilt Cup in Savannah in 1911, and taking 2nd in the first Indianapolis 500.



    If I win the lottery tonight, I may buy it.
  • GardawgGardawg Posts: 10,063 AG
    edited October 2018 #10
    Would you go 136 on a bike like this? Not me.


    In 1907, Curtiss set an unofficial world record of 136.36 miles per hour (219.45 km/h), on a   V8 powered motorcycle of his own design and construction. 


    “Today a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves.

    Heres Tom with the Weather.”
  • mindyabinessmindyabiness Posts: 6,501 Admiral
    edited October 2018 #11
    Gardawg said:
    Would you go 136 on a bike like this? Not me.


    In 1907, Curtiss set an unofficial world record of 136.36 miles per hour (219.45 km/h), on a   V8 powered motorcycle of his own design and construction. 

    .,
    Looks like it has a drive shaft with a massive u joint ....and no suspension......imagine the vibration.
    Check out the brake on the rear tire.....and where are the foot pegs?
    Arguing with idiots is like playing chess with a pigeon... No matter how good you are, the bird is going to crap on the board and strut around like it won anyway.
  • GardawgGardawg Posts: 10,063 AG
    BTW … Glenn Curtiss was the first person to get a pilot's license in the U.S. 


    “Today a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves.

    Heres Tom with the Weather.”
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 23,346 AG
    My mamma never let me ride motos and I'm scarred of them!
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 13,534 AG
    Gardawg said:
    Would you go 136 on a bike like this? Not me.


    In 1907, Curtiss set an unofficial world record of 136.36 miles per hour (219.45 km/h), on a   V8 powered motorcycle of his own design and construction. 


    The Boss Hoss version 1.0
    Like is like a Helicopter.  I do not know how to operate a Helicopter  
  • JohnABJohnAB APOPKAPosts: 228 Deckhand
    Cyclist said:
    Open her up and try and hit 130mph?
    It’s a 16.5-liter straight-six with “just” 250 hp and 3,000 lb/ft (4,063 Nm) - yes, that’s not a typo. With wheels the size of those you’ll find on an ice cream cart, it’s easy to see why setting off in this car is something that requires a lot of skill and finesse. Unless, of course, you like to do as Mike and pull a little burnout each time.

    The car is said to be able to reach 127 mph (204 km/h), but it would take a brave man to actually test those figures. And a brave woman as well, since the car requires two people to operate.









    I guess that's where the term "trunk" originated.
  • Big BatteryBig Battery Posts: 20,592 AG
    Gardawg said:
    BTW … Glenn Curtiss was the first person to get a pilot's license in the U.S. 


    On April 6, 1927, William P. MacCracken, Jr., Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Aeronautics, received Pilot License No. 1, a private pilot license. Before accepting the license, MacCracken had offered the honor to Orville Wright, promising to waive the fee and examination. Wright declined because he no longer flew and did not think he needed a Federal license to show that he had been the first man to fly.



  • GardawgGardawg Posts: 10,063 AG
    edited October 2018 #17
    Found the source of my confusion.

    Didn't remember all the details.  

    n 1907, Alexander Graham Bell invited Curtiss to develop a suitable engine for heavier-than-air flight experimentation. Bell regarded Curtiss as "the greatest motor expert in the country"[12] and invited Curtiss to join his Aerial Experiment Association (AEA).

    AEA aircraft experiments[edit]

    The June Bug on its prize-winning historic flight with Curtiss at the controls

    Between 1908 and 1910, the AEA produced four aircraft, each one an improvement over the last. Curtiss primarily designed the AEA's third aircraft, Aerodrome #3, the famous June Bug, and became its test pilot, undertaking most of the proving flights. On July 4, 1908, he flew 5,080 ft (1,550 m) to win the Scientific American Trophy and its $2,500 prize.[13] This was considered to be the first pre-announced public flight of a heavier-than-air flying machine in America. The flight of the June Bug propelled Curtiss and aviation firmly into public awareness.


     On June 8, 1911 Curtiss received U.S. Pilot's License #1 from the Aero Club of America, because the first batch of licenses were issued in alphabetical order; Wilbur Wright received license #5. 



    At the culmination of the Aerial Experiment Association's experiments, Curtiss offered to purchase the rights to Aerodrome #3, essentially using it as the basis of his "Curtiss No. 1, the first of his production series of pusher aircraft.[14

    Curtiss and his family moved to Florida in the 1920s, where he founded 18 corporations, served on civic commissions, and donated extensive land and water rights. He co-developed the city of Hialeah with James Bright and developed the cities of Opa-locka and Miami Springs,
    “Today a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves.

    Heres Tom with the Weather.”
  • stc1993stc1993 Albany, GA Carrabelle, FLPosts: 7,679 Admiral
    It seems both of you are correct.
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 23,346 AG

    Campbell-Railton-Rolls Royce Blue Bird 1933

    Powered by an R-type, supercharged 2,500-hp V-12 Rolls Royce engine, this engine required another new body with two bulges covering the cylinder banks and a forward facing air intake for the supercharger protruding from the nose, to create a ram air effect. This new body was again built by Gurney, Nutting's. First trials were again at Daytona Beach in February 1933, with the first record in this car set at 272.46 mph at Daytona Beach on 22nd February 1933.

    1933 version


    The famous "Blue Bird" name originated when Malcolm Campbell, already a successful automobile racer at Brooklands, was inspired by Maeterlinck's play "The Blue Bird of Happiness". He went to his local hardware shop and bought up all the blue paint he could to paint his car. With paint still wet, the car won two races at Brooklands and a legend was born.

    Powered by an R-type, supercharged 2,500-hp V-12 Rolls Royce engine, this engine required another new body with two bulges covering the cylinder banks and a forward facing air intake for the supercharger protruding from the nose, to create a ram air effect. This new body was again built by Gurney, Nutting's. First trials were again at Daytona Beach in February 1933, with the first record in this car set at 272.46 mph at Daytona Beach on 22nd February 1933.

    The design of the car was an enormous advance on that of the earlier cars of the series. The familiar vertical fin on the tail had been provided, to give lateral stability, but it introduced a problem of its own. Any attempt at making the steering of the car more stable by fitting such a tail fin must result in greater sensitivity to the effects of a side wind, and another compromise became necessary.

    Excessive weight meant high stresses on the tyres and insufficient ballasting, which meant wheel spin. The load was adjusted by lead weights carried inside the main frame members, inside the tubular cross members and in all other convenient places. About 1,500 lb. of ballast of this kind were carried. In spite of this, it appeared that the adhesion was not sufficient, and the wheel spin set a limit to the speed of the car.

    The car was heavy enough to be slow in its reactions to disturbing forces, and was therefore safer than a lighter car would have been. The better the body shape of such a car, the leas work has the driver to do in keeping it on a straight course. The normal reaction to air pressure tends to depress the nose of the car, and the corresponding elevation of the rear portion reduces the adhesion. All these factors were carefully balanced against one another, and the results obtained leave no doubt that Blue Bird was as safe a car as it could possibly be in the circumstances governing its design.

    Campbell had twice re-taken the record from Segrave in arguably the most exciting days of the world land speed record, those during the 1930s. But even though he remained the current record holder, he was not satisfied.

    Always the perfectionist, Campbell decided his car must go even faster. The great designer Reid Railton was called in and hit upon the idea of using one of the Rolls-Royce R-type racing aero engines giving 2,500 horse-power-five times the power of the original Lion engine.

    The adoption of a Rolls Royce engine however was not without problems. First the Bluebirds chassis was "stretched" to 27 feet by the insertion of gussets in the side-members, and these were also taken further forward to carry a new radiator.

    The clutch was also improved to take the extra power, and room made for an outsize supercharger at the front of the car.

    It was estimated the engine would last for three minutes at full boost, and Campbell thought this long enough to reach his new goal of 300 miles an hour.

    Many changes had been made to the Lion-engined Bluebird before the Rolls engine was fitted.

    The coachbuilders Gurney Nutting reshaped the car to take the new engine. Campbell came close, but in the end had to be satisfied with a record of 272.46 mph

    Country of Manufacture: Great Britain
    Engine Manufacturer: Rolls-Royce Type R Schneider Trophy aircraft type
    Cylinders V12
    Bore 152.4mm
    Stroke 167.64mm
    Cubic Capacity 36,582cc
    Compression ratio 6:1
    Carburettor Rolls-Royce
    Max. Power 2,300-2,500 bhp at 3,200rpm Single centrifugal supercharger
    Transmission:
    Clutch Duron faced
    Gearbox 3speed gearbox constant mesh, indirect drive
    Ratios 1.2 to 1 in top
    Back axle offset 7in to enable lower driving seat
    Type of drive bevel gear final drive 1.58 to 1
    Chassis: John Thompson Motor Pressings
    Suspension: Woodhead
    Shock Absorbers: Andre
    Brakes: Alford and Alder with Cayton Dewandre vacuum servo
    Wheels: steel disc
    Tyres: Dunlop 35 x 6in; pressure more than 100lb per sq in.; rpm at record speed 2,430rpm; tread 1/32in
    Dimensions: Wheelbase 13ft 8in., Track front 5ft 3in., Track rear 5ft, Length 27ft, Weight 4.75 tons dry
    Body Manufacturer: Gurney Nutting and Co. Ltd, material aluminium






  • PolarPolar Lake WorthPosts: 22,464 AG
    very cool stuff, thanks for sharing! 
  • mustang190mustang190 Posts: 10,104 AG
    Just just think how far flight has come in one hundred years. 
  • conchydongconchydong Pompano BeachPosts: 7,369 Admiral
    The famous author, Clive Cussler, has a great collection of vintage cars. I'd like to check them out someday when I am in Colorado.



    “Everyone behaves badly--given the chance.”
    ― Ernest Hemingway

  • swampwalkerswampwalker Posts: 2,359 Captain
    Good interesting read - thanks!
    The original - "Renaissance Redneck"
  • GardawgGardawg Posts: 10,063 AG
    My daredevil days are long over. 

    No I would not dare to drive any of those now.


    “Today a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves.

    Heres Tom with the Weather.”
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