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50 million Facebook accounts hacked

TarponatorTarponator Under a BridgePosts: 17,010 AG
edited September 2018 in Off Topic #1

A million hacked Facebook accounts isn’t cool. You know what’s even less cool? Fifty million hacked Facebook accounts.

A Friday morning press release from our connect-people-at-any-cost friends in Menlo Park detailed a potentially horrifying situation for the billions of people who use the social media service: Their accounts might have been hacked. Well, at least 50 million of them were "directly affected," anyway.

https://mashable.com/article/facebook-50-million-accounts-hacked/#S7mkdI1VLuqg

Facebook said its engineers discovered a security weakness this week that could let attackers hijack people’s accounts. The vulnerability, which the company said had been fixed, affected nearly 50 million accounts.

Facebook said in a web post that the security issue was related to the “View As” feature, which allows people to see a preview of what their profile looks like to other people, like specific friends. Hackers exploited a weakness in the tool to gain access to digital keys that let people access Facebook from a personal device without having to re-enter a password. The keys could then be used to take over people’s accounts, the company said.

The social networking giant said that it had reset all the access keys for affected users and that those users would have to log back into their accounts. In other words, there is not much you have to do. But there are some precautions you should take to protect yourself from the attack.

___________________________________________

My question to the rest of you is this:  Is it time for GDPR in the USA?

I'd say the time has long past.



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Replies

  • 4WARD4WARD Cross Creek,FLPosts: 2,040 Captain



    My question to the rest of you is this:  Is it time for GDPR in the USA?

    I'd say the time has long past.



    Put it in black and white, why the worry?
    Make a public comment, then you make a public comment. One you cannot argue.
    Facebook is the devil, said it 10,000 times. 50 million people have to stand behind their decision to join and expose themselves, some could care less and the ones that do are getting what they should have expected.
    "I hate graveyards and old pawn shops
    For they always bring me tears
    I can't forgive the way they rob me
    Of my childhood souvenirs"... John Prine
  • mplspugmplspug Palmetto FloridaPosts: 12,508 AG
    Uh oh, someone has all my sunset picture posts.

    Captain Todd Approves

  • TarponatorTarponator Under a BridgePosts: 17,010 AG
    edited September 2018 #4
    What, me worry?  

    To answer your question directly:  Because I don't think that Facebook is the devil, for one.  Nor do I think people who were hacked should expect their personal information to be put at risk without fear of starker consequences.  And with regard to that last part, and more to the point of my original question and answer, now in bold:  we should strengthen laws around data privacy and terms similar to GDPR (the EU data privacy laws) is a good start.  

    And if you wish to argue, I say bring it! 

    En garde...Mike  :)
  • 1outlaw1outlaw Naples FLPosts: 1,408 Officer
    Why do i care? What exactly would they get from my FB account?
    Jason :USA
  • 4WARD4WARD Cross Creek,FLPosts: 2,040 Captain
    What, me worry?  

    To answer your question directly:  Because I don't think that Facebook is the devil, for one.  Nor do I think people who were hacked should expect their personal information to be put at risk without fear of starker consequences.  And with regard to that last part, and more to the point of my original question and answer, now in bold:  we should strengthen laws around data privacy and terms similar to GDPR (the EU data privacy laws) is a good start.  

    And if you wish to argue, I say bring it! 

    En garde...Mike  :)
    Didn't say you would worry and could care less to argue.
    My opinion is that if you want to have a confidential or private exchange with someone, then why the hell would you put on a freakin computer? seems basically stupid to me.

    Sincerely.... 4ward
    "I hate graveyards and old pawn shops
    For they always bring me tears
    I can't forgive the way they rob me
    Of my childhood souvenirs"... John Prine
  • TarponatorTarponator Under a BridgePosts: 17,010 AG
    edited September 2018 #7
    4ward,

    Well, that's not very much fun.  :(

    The question is not of the motives or methods of those using computers, but rather the rights of those whose views on the topic have evolved beyond those of 1970.

    You sure you don't wanna argue?  :)
  • 4WARD4WARD Cross Creek,FLPosts: 2,040 Captain
    People that want data privacy should keep their data in their pants.
    Bout sums it up for me. Sorry a different opinion is so offensive musketeer mike:)
    "I hate graveyards and old pawn shops
    For they always bring me tears
    I can't forgive the way they rob me
    Of my childhood souvenirs"... John Prine
  • conchydongconchydong Pompano BeachPosts: 7,028 Admiral
    I guess I don't have to worry. Never had a Facebook account but I do worry about my regular bank account getting hacked.
    Fake Fishing forums are the extent of my social media.

    “Everyone behaves badly--given the chance.”
    ― Ernest Hemingway

  • mplspugmplspug Palmetto FloridaPosts: 12,508 AG
    I say take what ever the EU does and do the opposite is a winning formula.

    Captain Todd Approves

  • 1outlaw1outlaw Naples FLPosts: 1,408 Officer
    4WARD said:
    What, me worry?  

    To answer your question directly:  Because I don't think that Facebook is the devil, for one.  Nor do I think people who were hacked should expect their personal information to be put at risk without fear of starker consequences.  And with regard to that last part, and more to the point of my original question and answer, now in bold:  we should strengthen laws around data privacy and terms similar to GDPR (the EU data privacy laws) is a good start.  

    And if you wish to argue, I say bring it! 

    En garde...Mike  :)
    Didn't say you would worry and could care less to argue.
    My opinion is that if you want to have a confidential or private exchange with someone, then why the hell would you put on a freakin computer? seems basically stupid to me.

    Sincerely.... 4ward
    Agreed!
    Jason :USA
  • 4WARD4WARD Cross Creek,FLPosts: 2,040 Captain
    4ward,

    Well, that's not very much fun.  :(

    The question is not of the motives or methods of those using computers, but rather the rights of those whose views on the topic have evolved beyond those of 1970.

    You sure you don't wanna argue?  :)
    I got a boat to load(in the rain) but you never know, sometimes I cant sleep.

    Just put some 65# PP on my vintage(1976) Lott Bros custom, got some gators to snag.
    I love the 70s...……...;)
    "I hate graveyards and old pawn shops
    For they always bring me tears
    I can't forgive the way they rob me
    Of my childhood souvenirs"... John Prine
  • cadmancadman Home of the Gators Posts: 32,533 AG
    1outlaw said:
    Why do i care? What exactly would they get from my FB account?
    Let them hack mine, the fake one would likely be more exciting then the nothing I post there. 

    Mini Mart Magnate

    I am just here for my amusement. 

  • 1outlaw1outlaw Naples FLPosts: 1,408 Officer
    cadman said:
    1outlaw said:
    Why do i care? What exactly would they get from my FB account?
    Let them hack mine, the fake one would likely be more exciting then the nothing I post there. 
    I use mine, but WTH are they gonna take? Pictures? I posted it, statements? i either wrote them or shared them.

    Jason :USA
  • cadmancadman Home of the Gators Posts: 32,533 AG
    Maybe access to your friends list to try a scam, that is the only thing I see. 

    Mini Mart Magnate

    I am just here for my amusement. 

  • Fish HaidFish Haid Posts: 8,417 Admiral
    edited September 2018 #16
    1outlaw said:
    Why do i care? What exactly would they get from my FB account?

    Well, I went to Transunion website last week to "freeze" my credit.  Asked me to setup a password, then asked if I'd like to login via FaceBook, which I declined.  Seems like if they have your Facebook password, they can log into many other accounts, if you have been stupid enough to link to FB.  Also, most people do not use a totally different password for every account they have.  I'm sure some people use the same password for FB and their bank accounts.  I have at least 50 places I need to use passwords, but I only have 8-10 currently active passwords.
    23895.gif
  • mplspugmplspug Palmetto FloridaPosts: 12,508 AG
    Never use a third party login for things that are sensitive in nature.  I'm surprised TransUnion offered it as option, most won't.

    Captain Todd Approves

  • BallaCoiPersiciBallaCoiPersici NW Italy (Laveno Mombello)Posts: 5,967 Admiral
    edited September 2018 #18
    What, me worry?  

    To answer your question directly:  Because I don't think that Facebook is the devil, for one.  Nor do I think people who were hacked should expect their personal information to be put at risk without fear of starker consequences.  And with regard to that last part, and more to the point of my original question and answer, now in bold:  we should strengthen laws around data privacy and terms similar to GDPR (the EU data privacy laws) is a good start.  

    And if you wish to argue, I say bring it! 

    En garde...Mike  :)
    Mike, GDPR doesn’t offer any protection against hacking and people idiocy. To be honest doesn’t offer a real protection against everything. As usual EU bureaucracy, nothing more.

    I think people should protect themselves not posting all their personal data everywhere and not asking the governments or authorities to keep their privacy safe.
    But it looks like that a lot of people would like being under control by governments, easier than use their own brains. Auto enforced real socialism.
    Massimo (former Ballak) - Please, be patient for my English
    ********************************************************************************************************************************
    I'm typing keeping close my "pasta hole"!
    Political correctness is a mental disease that can put you in slavery. The only cure is to turn on the brain.
    I'm not afraid of Coravirus but I'm scared by the paranoid pandemic army who ask for the sanitary naz**m.
    Vulgus vult decipi, ergo decipiatur
  • surfmansurfman WC FLPosts: 5,982 Admiral
    My personal info on FB is incorrect anyway, so they can have at it.
    Tight Lines, Steve
    My posts are my opinion only.

    Be thankful we're not getting all the government we're paying for.  Will Rogers
  • 1outlaw1outlaw Naples FLPosts: 1,408 Officer
    Fish Haid said:
    1outlaw said:
    Why do i care? What exactly would they get from my FB account?

    Well, I went to Transunion website last week to "freeze" my credit.  Asked me to setup a password, then asked if I'd like to login via FaceBook, which I declined.  Seems like if they have your Facebook password, they can log into many other accounts, if you have been stupid enough to link to FB.  Also, most people do not use a totally different password for every account they have.  I'm sure some people use the same password for FB and their bank accounts.  I have at least 50 places I need to use passwords, but I only have 8-10 currently active passwords.

    I never log in through a 3rd party. 
    Jason :USA
  • MRichardsonMRichardson Posts: 10,438 AG
    The big social media players are American companies.  They buy American politicians. 
    Hence we don't get things like GDPR here.  
    This country is not about freedom, liberty or any of that other bull****.  
    It's about money.  All countries are too, but but have been round long enough to put into place better mitigation mechanisms, or otherwise have gone totally the other direction like Russia/China.
    I have never seen live bones, but I know that they are often used by rich people to decorate the interior.
  • NewberryJeffNewberryJeff Posts: 7,447 Admiral
    Someone hacked the global personal data collection service?  Don't people change their passwords anymore?
  • mplspugmplspug Palmetto FloridaPosts: 12,508 AG
    I use Chromes built in password generator and storage.  I also use Google's 2 step authentication. You can't try logging into my account from hardware I have not previously approved.

    Captain Todd Approves

  • TarponatorTarponator Under a BridgePosts: 17,010 AG
    edited October 2018 #24
    What, me worry?  

    To answer your question directly:  Because I don't think that Facebook is the devil, for one.  Nor do I think people who were hacked should expect their personal information to be put at risk without fear of starker consequences.  And with regard to that last part, and more to the point of my original question and answer, now in bold:  we should strengthen laws around data privacy and terms similar to GDPR (the EU data privacy laws) is a good start.  

    And if you wish to argue, I say bring it! 

    En garde...Mike  :)
    Mike, GDPR doesn’t offer any protection against hacking and people idiocy. To be honest doesn’t offer a real protection against everything. As usual EU bureaucracy, nothing more.

    I think people should protect themselves not posting all their personal data everywhere and not asking the governments or authorities to keep their privacy safe.
    But it looks like that a lot of people would like being under control by governments, easier than use their own brains. Auto enforced real socialism.
    I mean no disrespect, but it sounds to me like you don't know much about GDPR, Balla.  GDPR has practically nothing to do with government controls and a lot about how personal data should be protected, how the individual should be the one deciding what is and is not shared, and the penalties for not complying with the regulation.

    Here's a link so you can become more familiar with it:  https://eugdpr.org/the-regulation/

    And here's an article that points out how Facebook may have a large liabiltiy relative to this breach:  https://gizmodo.com/facebook-could-face-up-to-1-63-billion-fine-for-latest-1829426100

    So, who do you think is more likely to get Facebook to correct the problems?  The US who has a history of doing nothing about these incidents, the market in which they are practically a monopoly, or the EU that may fine Facebook $1.6B dollars?

    I can tell you with no uncertainty that GDPR has gotten every technology company that transacts in Europe focused on this, and in my opinion we in the US would be wise to follow their lead in this regard.
  • NewberryJeffNewberryJeff Posts: 7,447 Admiral
    Gdpr uses fines as a money generating scheme to finance the European Commission's fake government - change my mind.
  • BallaCoiPersiciBallaCoiPersici NW Italy (Laveno Mombello)Posts: 5,967 Admiral
    edited October 2018 #26
    This. I worked a lot around GDPR and largerly is paranoid bureaucracy useful only to collect money from private companies through fines. And it is absolutely useless in order to fight hacking or to protect people who deliberately expose themselves.
    Massimo (former Ballak) - Please, be patient for my English
    ********************************************************************************************************************************
    I'm typing keeping close my "pasta hole"!
    Political correctness is a mental disease that can put you in slavery. The only cure is to turn on the brain.
    I'm not afraid of Coravirus but I'm scared by the paranoid pandemic army who ask for the sanitary naz**m.
    Vulgus vult decipi, ergo decipiatur
  • TarponatorTarponator Under a BridgePosts: 17,010 AG
    edited October 2018 #27
    So those laws aren't really for privacy protection and billions of dollars in fines won't motivate corporations to provide better safeguards?  It's really just a scheme to finance the EU?

    Unbelievable.
  • ResinheadResinhead Posts: 10,974 AG
    Balla teaching school.🍺🍺🤣
  • TarponatorTarponator Under a BridgePosts: 17,010 AG
    edited October 2018 #29
    On this evening's show, even Lou Dobbs agreed with me on something, and his guest too: 

    https://video.foxbusiness.com/v/5843072006001

    Lou and I agree:   The time for comprehensive data privacy legislation in the US is long past due.  


  • BallaCoiPersiciBallaCoiPersici NW Italy (Laveno Mombello)Posts: 5,967 Admiral
    edited October 2018 #30
    So those laws aren't really for privacy protection and billions of dollars in fines won't motivate corporations to provide better safeguards?  It's really just a scheme to finance the EU?

    Unbelievable.
    Do you have any evidence that the fines money will be a refund for the hacked persons ?
    Mike, believe me, GDPR has just emphasized some useful rules, already enforced before, but with a whole view is a totally useless bureacracy monster.

    For instance the possibility for a former customer of a company to ask to delete his own personal data from the company databases, the so called "right to be forgotten", it crashes (in Italy but also in many other EU countries) with the obligation enforced on the companies to keep the customers data at least for ten years (twenty in many other cases) for fiscal reasons. 
    The example above is just the easiest but I worked a lot around GDPR and I can assure you that the effective results, in terms of practical benefits for the customers, are ridiculous. In particular considering the huge cost imposed to the companies to adapt their systems and processes.

    And, repetita iuvant, GDPR is totally useless in case of hacking or when someone broadcasts his personal data everywhere on the web. So the point of this thread.
    Massimo (former Ballak) - Please, be patient for my English
    ********************************************************************************************************************************
    I'm typing keeping close my "pasta hole"!
    Political correctness is a mental disease that can put you in slavery. The only cure is to turn on the brain.
    I'm not afraid of Coravirus but I'm scared by the paranoid pandemic army who ask for the sanitary naz**m.
    Vulgus vult decipi, ergo decipiatur
  • MRichardsonMRichardson Posts: 10,438 AG
    GDPR is not meant to stop all hacking nor protect idiots careless with their personal info.
    It is designed to incentivize "holders" of data to take certain basic steps to protect the privacy of the individuals who's data they have.  It is really a very basic requirement, long overdue.
    I have never seen live bones, but I know that they are often used by rich people to decorate the interior.
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