Replacing rod guides

I have an older rod that I'd like to try and replace the guides on it.  I've never done that before and was wondering how hard it is to do.  Any suggestions would be appreciated.   Thanks

Replies

  • Yeaaa_ChrisYeaaa_Chris Posts: 548 Officer
    It’s easy, need to use a form of GENTLE heat to soften up the old epoxy around the guides and carefully scrape off the old epoxy. You can usually unwind the thread and take off the whole guide at once.
    It’s very important to take it slow and not cut into the blank or use too much heat which will melt the blank. 
  • GarysmoGarysmo Posts: 431 Deckhand
    It’s easy, need to use a form of GENTLE heat to soften up the old epoxy around the guides and carefully scrape off the old epoxy. You can usually unwind the thread and take off the whole guide at once.
    It’s very important to take it slow and not cut into the blank or use too much heat which will melt the blank. 
    Some of the old epoxy and thread on the old guides is already loose so it should come off easy.  Hopefully I can put them on as easy.
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 2,939 Captain
    I learned long ago not to use any heat on old wraps or old epoxy on fishing rods... The heat doesn't cause the blank to "melt" it actually causes it to de-laminate (a fiberglass or graphite rod blank is actually a thermoplastic so heat is a no no...) and can fatally weaken a blank very easily (even if it looks okay...).. A better means of removing old thread, guides and finish is  to carefully use a single edged razor blade in the slight hollow where the thread goes over the guide feet...  All you're trying to do is cut through the thread.  You may have to make several light passes with the blade to penetrate the old finish or epoxy coating over the thread wraps - but it's well worth doing since you don't harm the blank... Once you've removed the guides -hang on to them since you'll more than likely want to use the same size for the new guides...  Any remaining finish after you remove all the thread and old guide can be carefully scraped away using the side of the razor blade - not the sharpened edge.  Scrape as lightly as possible and try to not scrape into the blank's original finish, leaving it intact if at all possible.

    You might also look up Mudhole (mudhole.com) for tutorials on rod wrapping, repairs, etc.  They're pretty handy.  When I learned to build rods, all those years ago , there was no internet and darned few books to learn rodbuilding from... Good luck.
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • GarysmoGarysmo Posts: 431 Deckhand
    Thanks for the info
  • Alex from GAAlex from GA Posts: 1,193 Officer
    What Bob said.  I use some very fine sandpaper to run over the places where the guides were then rewrap the guides.  I use a cardboard box, with v cuts to hold the rod for wrapping.  I made a thread holder out of a couple of pieces of wood, a 1/4" bolt, 2 washers, a spring and 2 nuts.  It puts the right tension on the thread.  As Bob said I also learned from the school of hard knocks, before internet.  The only store bought thing you will probably need is a dryer but I built my own from a bbq motor over 30 years ago and it's still working.  Use a file or a Dremel held in a vise to grind the new guide feet.
  • XafXaf Posts: 978 Officer
    I agree with lemaymiami, your best bet is to go to mudhole.com and watch some of their videos before you get started.
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 2,939 Captain
    Mudhole isn't the only info source for rodcrafters these days - you'd be amazed at the first rate info on little YouTube postings about all kinds of things (of course, for me - born in the stone age it's all a struggle).  When I first came to Miami in 1971 there were lots of young and not so young folks here locally that built their own rods since back then you couldn't find what we wanted to use in any store.  If you had a motorized bench for rodbuilding (a sewing machine motor on one end of the bench - turning a simple mandrel controlled by the foot pedal that came with the sewing motor..) you built it yourself since you couldn't buy a motorized wrapping machine like you can now... All of this was before the first graphite rod was ever built... Most back then were do it yourself types (or spent a bunch of money having someone else build it for them.. ).
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • Alex from GAAlex from GA Posts: 1,193 Officer
    On the left side of "rodbuilding.org" there is a list of rod component suppliers.
  • shadowwalkershadowwalker Posts: 2,198 Captain
    Thirty plus years using  alcohol lamp  to soften old finish for guide removal and now with out a single incident I can recall, I'm sure there had to be one, but its much more dangerous to remove most guides with a blade without heat than it is to do it with light heat.  One piece of advise .  Never put the flame under the guide or blank.   I use the side of the flame on the side of the guide and not too close.  I say quarter inch distance  with quarter inch flame and never stop the flame next to the guide, move it slowly back and froth for just a couple seconds and test cut the  thread.  My preferred cutting tool is a box cutter, easy to control for me any way. 
  • GarysmoGarysmo Posts: 431 Deckhand
    On the left side of "rodbuilding.org" there is a list of rod component suppliers.
    Thanks I'll check that out
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 2,939 Captain
    someone that knows how to use a small flame can do just fine - I've seen too many damaged rods when beginners try it with a propane torch... I do use propane myself - but only to "candle down" the bubbles in a new applied finish - and even then you can easily ruin a finish that way if you're not very careful... an alcohol flame is very old school and does work much better than a stronger propane torch.

    Whenever I give advice it's not for folks that could probably teach me a thing or two - it's for folks just starting out.  Most of the mistakes I write about are things I've done myself... 

    That's okay, though... my kids don't listen to me either...
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
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