The cost of hunting with a guide in florida ?

Steve_raleighSteve_raleigh Posts: 174 Deckhand
ok first I’m new to hunting life long saltwater fisherman 
until this past April in North Carolina me and a guide in North Carolina took a walk threw the woods to the edge of a farmers feild to shoot my 1st turkey 
and oh boy am I hooked 

my question is why down here in Florida do guides charge one price to go on a hunt and then a  ridiculous fee for what ever animal you’ve killed 
one outfitter I looked at on-line charges $2500 if you kill a turkey 

thats crazy 

Replies

  • gladesmangladesman Posts: 1,008 Officer
    Because the marketing of the Osceola turkey as the god of all turkeys has generated the need within some hunters to pay unreal amounts of money for a trophy - I mean it's a turkey not an Elephant. All about the $$$. One day discounts may be offered to paint dot or tranquilize "Knock Out and Release" (KOR) them so as to be able to sell them more than once to those who really need one similar to CPR fishing..
  • Steve_raleighSteve_raleigh Posts: 174 Deckhand
    Gladesman so does that mean the $2500 turkeys actually belong to the outfitter and are not wild turkeys ?

    ive seen the same with deer ect price to hunt then pay for what you shoot 
    I don’t think even if I won the powerball I’d shoot a turkey with a $2500 price tag on its head 
    I would rather aim high 
  • PinmanPinman Posts: 1,367 Officer
    The Osceola is one of the most difficult to harvest for a "Slam" - one of each sub-species on the continent. Partially because of the high value and limited supply of land in central and south Florida. Its also what drives the lease prices up the further you go South in the state. Limited supply. The outfitter is charging you based on all this. You are paying to be on the land with his knowledge. Not for a Turkey
  • binellishtrbinellishtr Posts: 7,793 Admiral
    S Fl has more turkeys now than ever.. thank a cougar
  • Turner River TerrorTurner River Terror Posts: 5,569 Admiral
    I,ve shot a bunch of them.
    Never realized they were smart till I went to Colorado and hunted , I think Rio Grands.
    Just always thought that's Turkey hunting growing up..
    Killin and Grillin :grin
  • shempshemp Posts: 493 Deckhand
    Start contacting guides and see what all they say.  There are often more affordable options but they have less advertising than the pricier ones.  Many hunts are 2 or 3 days and are priced that way even if you bag one in the 1st ten minutes

    They are wild birds

    Most of the time the landowner is not the outfitter, so the $ for the hunt is split b/t landowner and outfitter

    A lot of outfitted hunts are not guided, you are just paying for access

    When you think about it and you may have 4 or so toms per 2000 acres, and only want to harvest 2 at most, the pricing makes a bit more sense

    However, I have never nor will I ever shell out 4 figures for a turkey hunt, unless you count leasing land for a couple grand 
  • bswivbswiv Posts: 6,968 Admiral
    The part SHEMP raises about bird numbers. We've a fair amount of contiguous land, both ours and WMD, the WMD not being hunted, and you'd be surprised how few mature toms there are. More legal bucks than toms I'd venture.
  • kci-miakci-mia Posts: 188 Deckhand
    I have good number of Osceola turkeys on my property and I get asked/offered by number of local guides to hunt on my property.  I've always refused and so do all my neighbors but those guys have been offering pretty good $$$$.  According to my game camera this year I have 4 good size toms, 11 or 12 hens and few others that visit roost and/or visit my property almost daily.  Typically I'll harvest one tom every year on average...11 in last 10 years.
         

  • Walker DogWalker Dog Posts: 1,758 Captain
    edited June 2 #10
    What they offer doesn't compare to what a landowner could lease the same land for unless you're talking about them talking a couple of birds on 100 acres or less. Sometimes makes good sense on a small property but not often on larger places.
  • huntsfloridahuntsflorida Posts: 370 Deckhand
    Pinman said:
    The Osceola is one of the most difficult to harvest for a "Slam" - one of each sub-species on the continent. Partially because of the high value and limited supply of land in central and south Florida. Its also what drives the lease prices up the further you go South in the state. Limited supply. The outfitter is charging you based on all this. You are paying to be on the land with his knowledge. Not for a Turkey

    Ditto. Southern Florida is the most expensive in the state.
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  • PinmanPinman Posts: 1,367 Officer
    bswiv said:
    The part SHEMP raises about bird numbers. We've a fair amount of contiguous land, both ours and WMD, the WMD not being hunted, and you'd be surprised how few mature toms there are. More legal bucks than toms I'd venture.


    Turkey numbers are way more cyclical than Deer numbers. I'm looking at all this rain we have had in S Fla the last month and I cringe when thinking about the nests and poults effected.

    When I first Turkey hunted 10 or so years ago it was major drought conditions and the Turkeys were everywhere. Now its a bit harder.

  • PinmanPinman Posts: 1,367 Officer

    Ditto. Southern Florida is the most expensive in the state.
    In the State for sure. Ranks high in he country too I'm willing to bet.



  • micci_manmicci_man Somewhere in FLPosts: 12,410 AG
    Pinman said:

    Ditto. Southern Florida is the most expensive in the state.
    In the State for sure. Ranks high in he country too I'm willing to bet.



    Of course, it's one of the birds needed for a slam.
    Common Sense can't be bought, taught or gifted, yet it is one of the few things in life that is free, and most refuse to even attempt to possess it. - Miguel Cervantes
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