Archery Practice

spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 802 Officer
edited May 25 in General Hunting #1
On the deer hunting from the ground thread, Cyclist pointed out something I hadn't thought of.  For my purposes, my question is about the reverse.

It's been years since I shot archery.  I was naturally good at it and I'm really excited to go out for archery for the first time this coming season.  I'm still deciding on a setup, which I hope to have soon.  I'm confident by season, I'll be dialed in.

It hadn't occurred to me however, that I might want to practice shooting from a tree stand, while I'm polishing back up.  I'm betting going from ground to tree doesn't throw you off as much (I'm thinking the angle of attack is to your advantage in the tree?), but I can still see where it makes sense to practice from a tree stand, if nothing more than to get comfortable with it. I agree it might affect your shooting style as well.

Problem is, I don' have a tree in my yard suitable for climbing.  Are there any laws in florida restricting archery?  Anyone see a problem with finding a little secluded spot on public land close to my house to practice?

I place safety at the forefront of everything I do, so I don't need advice on that.  It is understood, no matter where I am, I need to take certain precautions to ensure someone doesn't get hurt.  I'm more concerned about breaking a law.

Replies

  • gritsnhuntin1gritsnhuntin1 Posts: 867 Officer
    Get on your roof first. Its a much bigger area to stand on and will still get you up off the ground. As long as you have a 1 story house and a roof pitch that isn't  too steep its a great alternative to a stand. Go find some trees a lil closer to start of the season.
  • 4WARD4WARD Cross Creek,FLPosts: 1,000 Officer
    Elevation makes a huge difference. So does stance.
    Roof is good, even climbing a "A" frame ladder and shooting kind of locks your feet and positioning in to similar to a small stand platform. Shoot at as many different angles as you can.
     Critters always come in from the worst possible direction you know.
    "I hate graveyards and old pawn shops
    For they always bring me tears
    I can't forgive the way they rob me
    Of my childhood souvenirs"... John Prine
  • james 14james 14 Posts: 2,877 Moderator
    I don't notice much change in form when moving from the ground to a stand. Just make sure you're using the distance from the base of the tree to the target rather than the actual distance to target. It's not a bad idea, however, to do some practice from a stand just to confirm.
  • EarlyRiser1EarlyRiser1 Posts: 124 Deckhand
    When shooting from an elevated position, you have to maintain a “T” with your upper body. First draw in an erect stance, aiming horizontally to the ground, then bend at the waist while holding the “T” form as you aim at the target. If your form collapses and you loose the “T” your arrow will not hit where you are aiming. By “T” I mean that bow arm and draw arm are 180 degrees from each other. If either arm drops closer to your body as you bend at the waist, your shot will be off. 
  • FlatoneFlatone Posts: 18 Greenhorn
    Man...  when the deer steps in front of you, all this practicing from tree stand crap is irrelevant.   I have never practiced from a tree stand and never made a poor shot that I attributed to lack of practice from an elevated stand.  Practice at 60 yards...... a lot!!!!!  Not because you will take a shot at 60, but because 30 feels like a chip shot.  And that confidence is what you want.  
  • MCSHunterMCSHunter Posts: 376 Deckhand
    I rely heavily on my rangefinder which compensates for the angle and gives me exact shooting distance. Leopold-1600i TBR/W.
  • flydownflydown Posts: 6,464 Admiral
    When shooting from an elevated position, you have to maintain a “T” with your upper body. First draw in an erect stance, aiming horizontally to the ground, then bend at the waist while holding the “T” form as you aim at the target. If your form collapses and you loose the “T” your arrow will not hit where you are aiming. By “T” I mean that bow arm and draw arm are 180 degrees from each other. If either arm drops closer to your body as you bend at the waist, your shot will be off. 
    Spot on advice right here. 
    DYING for me was the most HE could do. LIVING for HIM is the least I can do
  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 802 Officer
    ^This makes sense to me.  And I see the importance.  Not something I had heard before so thank you for that.

    And thanks to everyone for all your advice!!  I can definitely practice on my roof.  Then probably a just a few times in a stand (with the restricted maneuverability) should get me sorted out.  Awesome.
  • gritsnhuntin1gritsnhuntin1 Posts: 867 Officer
    Hunting definitely has a learning curve. Just get out and start hunting. You will find out areas that need more work as you go. I thing finding game to actually shoot at is the biggest thing. Then after missing a few you can practice those exact scenarios if necessary.
  • 4WARD4WARD Cross Creek,FLPosts: 1,000 Officer
    Only thing I will add is practice often and keep it short.
    As in... don't shoot for an hour, start missing and then decide to start tweaking on your bow. 
    First shot is the one that counts.
     I like to shoot 6 times, make a very small adjustment if needed and then shoot 6 more.
    Then put it up till the next day. You will be dialed in in no time.
    Overthink it and wear yourself out and you will find yourself overcorrecting.
     
    "I hate graveyards and old pawn shops
    For they always bring me tears
    I can't forgive the way they rob me
    Of my childhood souvenirs"... John Prine
  • Rich MRich M Posts: 1,118 Officer
    Practice however you are gonna shoot.

    So many guys feel the need to stand when shooting a bow out of a tree stand - you can do it sitting too.  Being deaf - If I had to stand up I'd spook em every time.

    I also think that you only need to shoot a few times each day - no sense shooting until you get tired and start making mistakes.  Shoot 6-12 arrows and do whatever else you would normally do.  

    I thought I could fall right back into shooting well since I shot almost daily for about 25-30 years.  Not so - took me about 300-500 arrows to be where I would hunt.  Then I didn't see nothing in range and haven't shot since.  Trying to decide if I want to play that game this year or just got to GA and shoot a couple deer without fussing over it.  It isn't so much a passion as a way to fill the freezer.


  • H20dadH20dad Posts: 982 Officer
    Back when I bow hunted every year, the season started at the beginning of October. I started shooting the first week of July and it took that long to get ready. But equipment has come a long way since then. 

    I would shoot daily daily for at least 30 minutes. The first shot was always at the main range I expected most of my shots hunting. 35 yards. That was a between pins range and always had me thinking. Then I would shoot 60-80 yards until I started getting tired and then work my way down. But I always shot all the distances in 5 yard increments. Part was to be very comfortable with how my bow shot at each distance and to give my mind tons of sight pictures of the many yardages. 

    I also used used a laser range finder to know distances from my stand to the ground but I wouldn’t risk spooking a deer ranging it as it worked in to range. My pre ranged points and sight pictures should allow me to put the arrow into the vitals. 

    The deer will never stop at 20,30 or 40 yards. You need to be able to “see” this and be comfortable with making the minor adjustments to put that arrow in the middle of the vitals. 

    The last month before season was always spent shooting from guessed ranges and using my eyes to estimate range. Something more duck hunters should practice as well. 🤦🏻‍♂️
  • Rodfather73Rodfather73 Tampa, FlPosts: 24 Greenhorn
    I enjoyed reading these comments. I constantly change up my shooting, distances and angle. GET AND 3D TARGET. I sometimes remove the plastic horns, turn the head,, etc. Sometimes i even run or jog in place to practice with an elevated heart rate. IT MAKES A DIFFERENCE. And keep in mind that sometimes you will need to practice holding at full draw for awhile.
  • HollywoodcorollaHollywoodcorolla Posts: 263 Deckhand
    Has anyone shot the victory trophy hunter arrows? 
    Time for some new ones. I’m currently using Easton powerflights. The victory are on clearence. Is it cause they suck or last years model? 
  • relicshunterrelicshunter Posts: 526 Officer
    I enjoyed reading these comments. I constantly change up my shooting, distances and angle. GET AND 3D TARGET. I sometimes remove the plastic horns, turn the head,, etc. Sometimes i even run or jog in place to practice with an elevated heart rate. IT MAKES A DIFFERENCE. And keep in mind that sometimes you will need to practice holding at full draw for awhile.
    Good idea to elevate your heart rate, you'll be glad you practiced different ways.  I always try to hold a few at full draw to strengthen up for just those times. Can't stress enough what many are saying about practicing for only a short while, do not get tired doing it it will do more harm then good to your form and ability's 
  • LostconchLostconch Posts: 169 Deckhand
    Try Bow Fishing
     It gives all the holding at full draw practice you could want
  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 802 Officer
    This turned into a great thread!  So much good stuff!!  Thanks again to everyone for contributing!!

    For practice, bow fishing actually makes a lot of sense for me.  It fits my bill and a bit more fun than shooting targets.  Can I just add a reel gimmick or do you have to buy a bow made for it?
  • LostconchLostconch Posts: 169 Deckhand
    The reel will mount in the thread for
    The stabilizer. It is pretty simple.
  • HollywoodcorollaHollywoodcorolla Posts: 263 Deckhand
    A few arrows in the morning and evening. 
    Practicing at 80 yards makes makes 20 and 40 yards shots like mamas pie 
  • scoop337scoop337 Posts: 46 Greenhorn
    spangler said:
    I'm betting going from ground to tree doesn't throw you off as much (I'm thinking the angle of attack is to your advantage in the tree?), but I can still see where it makes sense to practice from a tree stand, if nothing more than to get comfortable with it. I agree it might affect your shooting style as well.

    Problem is, I don' have a tree in my yard suitable for climbing.  Are there any laws in florida restricting archery?  Anyone see a problem with finding a little secluded spot on public land close to my house to practice?
    Don't think is necessary to practice from a tree stand unless you never climbed a tree in a climber. All stands are a seat in a tree, some are more comfortable than others. As far as public areas to shoot, I have practiced in Rail Road Right of Ways in town and never had issues.
  • Walker DogWalker Dog Posts: 1,823 Captain
    Railroad right of ways? They aren't public. At least not the active ones. That sounds like a good recipe for a bad day.
  • swampwalkerswampwalker Posts: 1,512 Captain
    Once I'm hunting, I'll often shoot a practice shot before climbing down in the morning. Evening I set till shooting is out if the question. I've also learned to shoot setting down. It'l be here before we know it - 70 days and counting for zone C.
    The original - "Renaissance Redneck"
  • H20dadH20dad Posts: 982 Officer
    Once I'm hunting, I'll often shoot a practice shot before climbing down in the morning. Evening I set till shooting is out if the question. I've also learned to shoot setting down. It'l be here before we know it - 70 days and counting for zone C.
    26 days here. 
  • creekgeekcreekgeek Posts: 600 Officer
    Cool thread.  I've certainly started already.  I do many of the same things mentioned here.  A few shots a day - maybe 10 to 20.  Change distances.  Sit down sometimes. The biggest one I think people miss is the long hold - it takes patience but will pay off.  I even do this at the rifle range...sometimes I get some odd looks but who's doing the right prep work with their practice time?  Here's a good video clip showing why the long hold practice helps....you can see the hand shaking start in the vid and I shot high and got a bit lucky....watch the clock on the draw and hold time....




  • creekgeekcreekgeek Posts: 600 Officer
    yeah...try this one....



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