Flamingo fishing report, 2 May...

This time of year most guides are running -pretty much non-stop, day after day, so this will be my first report in weeks... Fishing out of Flamingo is a real challenge day after day since there's no place to stay there except for the campground and the daily commute (for me, almost 100 miles each way...) is a grind.... Now that the visitor season is beginning to diminish I'm finally getting a breather so here we go....

The past four weeks I've had anglers from age five to older than me (that old?) aboard and we've had our share of good days... The trout run this spring was pretty good with fish up to and a bit over the 24" mark available almost any day but it's over now.  Thank heavens the snook and redfish have begun to take up the slack.... Since the stone crab season (with all those lovely pot markers that tripletail like to hang around) is nearly over - the big triples have begun to show up back inshore - we got a ten pounder a few days ago in less than five feet of water.  As the stone crab season ends, crabbers have to remove their traps from the water -- so there's no markers for the triples to hang around, all summer long.... and we'll be taking advantage of that as they migrate back inshore.  There are still lots of tarpon in every size along the Gulf coast - but any day now the big girls (and their suitors) will begin their spawning migration down to Islamorada - or back to the north towards Boca Grande and leave our area... The signs are there - we're seeing fish beginning to daisy chain and play "follow the leader" which is a sure indicator that almost all of the big fish will be here one day - then gone the next... The good news is that every fish from 50- 60lb and smaller will still be right where they've been and open for business... Starting about mid-summer the big fish will begin returning to the 'Glades and keep on coming until, by September we'll be in the middle of our "second season", something no tarpon angler will want to miss....

Now for a few pics taken within recent days... 
John Kern from Utah with a good solid ten pound tripletail taken on a small lure in less than five feet of water... We hooked three that size in a row - but only landed this one.  It was carefully released to fight another day (most of my local anglers would be planning on tripletail for dinner that night...).


That same day, John's partner, Mark, caught and released this solid upper slot redfish nearby along a Gulf shoreline.  We released two of them, that size, that day...


John with a nice small snook at a Gulf river mouth...


On Monday I had Roy Arnold from Pittsburgh aboard - this was his biggest snook to date, at almost 28" caught and released with an 8wt fly rod and a Silhouette fly (one of my signature patterns...).  It's definitely that time of year....

Be a hero - take a kid fishing!
Tight Lines
Bob LeMay
(954) 435-5666

Replies

  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 3,097 Captain
    Almost forgot to mention... this character was hanging out each morning at dawn, right next to the boat ramp.... No, this isn't a big one... crocs at Flamingo can be amost as big as my skiff....
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 3,097 Captain
    here's the pic - this format doesn't seem to allow editing at all (moderator please fix if possible....)
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • MGDMGD Posts: 1,035 Officer
    They should add to that sign "and loss of limb or life"!

  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 3,097 Captain
    The biologists keep telling us that the American saltwater crocodile is a fish eater and no threat to people... Me?  I just don't think they've ever been able to study the eating habits of a really big one... and I have seen one croc that was nearly as long as my skiff (nearing 17' long, my skiff is 16' 10"...) and every bit of almost four feet wide across  the shoulders.

    I always tell folks that it's 'gators to be wary of - but that's just not how crocs look whenever you see one.  The last morning we saw him laying there a much bigger croc (looked to be in the 13' + range) suddenly hammered the water with his tail about a hundred yards farther south towards the dam - and this one responded by roaring -then went back to sleep.  At first I didn't associate the sound with that croc - it sounded like someone had turned on a big generator....

    I figure the lack of any fish-cutting table now at Flamingo since the last hurricane seems to be the draw that has us seeing many more crocs than usual around the interior ramp... They must be feeding well these days since folks have no choice but to cut their fish aboard their boats at the end of each day....  Wonder if the folks who run the Park have even noticed.
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • whatzsnookingwhatzsnooking Posts: 28 Greenhorn

    you the man sir!!!!!

  • 1outlaw1outlaw Naples FLPosts: 887 Officer
    Great report Bob! Thanks for sharing!!
    Jason :USA
  • BonesBones Posts: 179 Deckhand
    Great report.  If you want why dont you revive the Flamingo Reports Thread  as I am not doing much fishing these days but like to read the Flamingo reports. 
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 3,097 Captain
    I’ll do that with my next report....
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
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