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Wild ‘Everglades’ tomato

CyclistCyclist Posts: 23,346 AG
For you gardeners I would suggest trying this tomato. Once you get one, they easily start from seed and cutting and are the perfect tomato for the black thumb. Or green thumb.

Seeds are pretty easy to find online or possibly farmers markets.

https://www.fairchildgarden.org/Events-Community-Outreach/Events-Details/wild-everglades-tomato-is-ideal-for-south-florida-gardens-1

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  • GA FinGA Fin Posts: 8,956 Admiral
    Interesting. They appear to be a cultivar of the cherry tomato. Are cherry tomatoes difficult to grow?
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  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 23,346 AG
    edited April 2018 #3
    GA Fin said:
    Interesting. They appear to be a cultivar of the cherry tomato. Are cherry tomatoes difficult to grow?
    I believe they are their own species. Solanum pimpinellifolium.
    Solanum lycopersicum is the regular tomato that is grown.

    I think they are easiest and this Everglades tomato the easiest of them all. They pop up in my garden from my compost and already I have a plant loaded. I even have them coming up in winter and they survive and bear fruit if I cover them during freezes.

    It happens to be really really tasty and super prolific.


  • Fish HaidFish Haid Posts: 8,417 Admiral
    I remember the old UF sewage plant on the corner of Museum Rd., across from the Reitz Union.  Back in the 80's.  The sludge piles were right there next to the sidewalk.  Talk about LOTS of healthy tomato plants!  Hundreds of big red juicy ones.  All varieties.  I know people who picked them, but I never did.  Not because they were growing in human dung, but because I knew how many toxic chemicals went down the laboratory drains at UF.  I wonder why the tomatoes thrived, but never saw corn, cukes, beans, etc.
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  • MadbeachMadbeach On the riverPosts: 970 Officer
    Looks just like a 'Matt's Wild Cherry' tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).  They'll continue to fruit until you cut them back or frost hits them.  They probably do good on a trellis. 
  • 4WARD4WARD Cross Creek,FLPosts: 2,044 Captain
    Fish Haid said:
    I remember the old UF sewage plant on the corner of Museum Rd., across from the Reitz Union.  Back in the 80's.  The sludge piles were right there next to the sidewalk.  Talk about LOTS of healthy tomato plants!  Hundreds of big red juicy ones.  All varieties.  I know people who picked them, but I never did.  Not because they were growing in human dung, but because I knew how many toxic chemicals went down the laboratory drains at UF.  I wonder why the tomatoes thrived, but never saw corn, cukes, beans, etc.

    Good friend of mine and his buddy hung a "NO FISHING" sign on the fence in the early 70's as a joke.
    Funny thing is UF actually replaced them with printed signs several years later.
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  • conchydongconchydong Pompano BeachPosts: 7,048 Admiral
    We had some small cherry tomatoes growing wild at our cottage on Sugarloaf Key back in the 60's. Perhaps that is what they were. They sprouted from their own seeds and spread all over the vacant lot next to us. I guess some birds, rats and Coons ate them but it seemed like there was always plenty to go around.

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    ― Ernest Hemingway

  • Fish HaidFish Haid Posts: 8,417 Admiral
    I was out in the woods one time, picking mushrooms.  There were some huge healthy tomato plants growing up out of a hole in the ground.  Figured out it was where an old out house had been.
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  • Florida BullfrogFlorida Bullfrog Posts: 3,437 Captain
    I’m going to try some of these. I might be too far north but it won’t hurt to throw some seeds out to see what happens. Do they grow faster than normal tomatoes?
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 23,346 AG
    edited April 2018 #10
    I’m going to try some of these. I might be too far north but it won’t hurt to throw some seeds out to see what happens. Do they grow faster than normal tomatoes?
    They are doing fine in Gville, not sure how far north you are. They seem to grow faster and set fruit faster. They are indeterminate so they really don't stop growing until the weather shuts them down (hot or cold, although they seem more heat tolerant than most). You can take cuttings as well, when the older plants start to peter out.
  • jcbcpajcbcpa Posts: 1,930 Captain
    I’m going to try some of these. I might be too far north but it won’t hurt to throw some seeds out to see what happens. Do they grow faster than normal tomatoes?
    Not sure where you are, but I grew up on an egg/chicken farm and they grew wild all over the farm. I'm in South Ga.
    We would have folks come buy to buy eggs and ask if they could pick tomatoes. 
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  • Florida BullfrogFlorida Bullfrog Posts: 3,437 Captain
    I’m in Hamilton county. 
  • Florida BullfrogFlorida Bullfrog Posts: 3,437 Captain
    edited May 2019 #13
    Resurrecting this old dead thread.

    I had forgotten all about this thread and about the Everglades tomato. I rediscovered the tomatoes when I visited the farm I got my cracker game chickens from and they had some of the Everglades tomatoes growing. 

    I only found this thread via a google search about Everglades tomatoes. 

    I got 80 seeds sitting on my shelf. When I’m totally done with the chicken coop my next project will be starting these seeds. My understanding from further research I’ve done is that they ought to thrive even in the height of summer. 

    I also have something called a “Seminole pumkin” which was apparently a pumkin the ‘Noles grew that also thrives in Florida heat and soil. 
  • cadmancadman Home of the Gators Posts: 32,603 AG
    Dang, I thought Cyclist had returned when i saw this thread. 

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  • GardawgGardawg Posts: 9,787 Admiral
    I grew some of those … they were small and tasty. 
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  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 2,722 Captain
    Yep, only tomato I know of that will produce all summer in Florida.  They also seem to be resistant to root nematodes.  They're actually the only tomatoes I grow in the ground.  They also self seed fairly reliably.  Quite tasty.  I got seeds from a guy on the old gardenweb forum years ago.
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  • FreeLinerFreeLiner Posts: 1,573 Captain
    edited May 2019 #17
    Cyclist said:
    For you gardeners I would suggest trying this tomato. Once you get one, they easily start from seed and cutting and are the perfect tomato for the black thumb. Or green thumb.

    Seeds are pretty easy to find online or possibly farmers markets.

    https://www.fairchildgarden.org/Events-Community-Outreach/Events-Details/wild-everglades-tomato-is-ideal-for-south-florida-gardens-1

    My mom grows them in her garden.  They die off and come back all the time.  If it weren’t for ducks I’d grow them. Agreed that they are good, been wanting to make sauce with them but it would take a million.
  • Tarpon65Tarpon65 Posts: 6,632 Admiral
    I found some seeds for sale here:  https://www.victoryseeds.com/tomato_everglades.html .  I may order a couple packs.
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  • mindyabinessmindyabiness Posts: 6,417 Admiral
    edited May 2019 #19
    Might should wait till winter.....
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  • ANUMBER1ANUMBER1 Posts: 11,693 AG
    I have two plants, they are d arn good in a salad, pasta salad, or just grab a handful and eat..

    Almost impossibe to kill.
    I am glad to only be a bird hunter with bird dogs...being a shooter or dog handler or whatever other niche exists to separate appears to generate far too much about which to worry.
  • tampaspicertampaspicer Posts: 425 Deckhand
    Does anyone know if this tomato will produce fruit even if the night time temps stay above 70?
  • conchydongconchydong Pompano BeachPosts: 7,048 Admiral
    Does anyone know if this tomato will produce fruit even if the night time temps stay above 70?

    If they are the same ones we had in the Keys the answer is yes.

    “Everyone behaves badly--given the chance.”
    ― Ernest Hemingway

  • Florida BullfrogFlorida Bullfrog Posts: 3,437 Captain
    Does anyone know if this tomato will produce fruit even if the night time temps stay above 70?
    My understanding is that in south Florida they grow and produce year-round. In north Florida a freeze will kill them back but they are so prolific they reseed themselves and come back up in the spring. Not only will they come back, they’ll spread themselves to the point they become a nuisance. The warning that I keep hearing on videos and word of mouth is that they ought not be planted anywhere you don’t want them to take over. 

    I ate one on the farm I visited and it was a great tasting little tomato. 

    I have major problems on my farm with deer and rabbits eating my planted crops. The only place I can get veggies to grow unmolested is right by the house, and only then by letting my dogs sleep outside at night. And even then the deer have patterned my dogs and they still walk the outskirts of my yard. 

    So my goal with the Everglades tomatoes is to get some established by my house, then I’m going to take the seeds from those and spread them all over the woods and wet areas and see what happens. I hope they can outpace the wildlife if planted in sufficient quantity.  
  • ANUMBER1ANUMBER1 Posts: 11,693 AG
    Does anyone know if this tomato will produce fruit even if the night time temps stay above 70?
    yes, **** good tasting too.
    I am glad to only be a bird hunter with bird dogs...being a shooter or dog handler or whatever other niche exists to separate appears to generate far too much about which to worry.
  • FlashFlash Posts: 11,211 AG
    Sun has been cooking them. Thankfully temps at night have been in mid to low 60's. I have already put my sun screens up or the tomatoes I have now will sun scaled

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  • Florida BullfrogFlorida Bullfrog Posts: 3,437 Captain
    Flash said:
    Sun has been cooking them. Thankfully temps at night have been in mid to low 60's. I have already put my sun screens up or the tomatoes I have now will sun scaled

    Are those the wild native tomatoes we’re talking about or domestic tomatoes?
  • FlashFlash Posts: 11,211 AG
    Flash said:
    Sun has been cooking them. Thankfully temps at night have been in mid to low 60's. I have already put my sun screens up or the tomatoes I have now will sun scaled

    Are those the wild native tomatoes we’re talking about or domestic tomatoes?
    No, these are the domestic. I want ones I can do a burger with. :)
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

    Never seem more learned than the people you are with. Wear your learning like a pocket watch and keep it hidden. Do not pull it out to count the hours, but give the time when you are asked. --- Lord Chesterfield
  • tankardtankard Posts: 7,031 Admiral

    Years ago we had one pop up in our yard in Orlando.

    Very productive all summer, I would easily pick a quart of ripe tomatoes a day.

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