Pompano Beach - 2 February 2018

2 February 2018 - Beautiful weather, but slow fishing.

This was the first break in weeks of windy weather, and even though it was a bright full moon night, I had to give it a try. I launched at 5 am to do some bait fishing along the beach. No luck finding goggle eyes, so switched the focus to runners around 6am. I meter plenty of bait fish out deeper, but they were reluctant to bite. I managed to sabiki half a dozen, one at a time on every third drop through solid fish finder meter marks. Just before sunrise, I stopped fishing baits and put out 2 lines for the slow troll with high hopes of finding a tropical pelagic.
By 10am not a single bite on baits nor vertical jigs. I kept seeing birds working weed lines in about 200ft of water, but had no luck fishing the areas. Finally around 11am I had my first bite on bait. My rod doubled over hard and line began screeching off the reel until the fish unbuttoned. I reeled up a mangled bait that had the teeth marks of a shark.

Fishing was painfully slow, but it was such a nice day on the water, I had to stay out and soak in. I hit many wrecks for zilch on the vertical jigs. Vertically jigging in 350 ft of water, I frequently marked fish around 90ft ( typically tuna) but no bites. Current was weak, so I decided to take a shot at tile fishing out deeper. I started the long peddle out, and at 400ft, hit a 2 knot Northerly current that made efforts futile. I tried a drop in 425ft with a 3lb lead, but the current was to strong for me to hold bottom even if I peddled against it. I headed in and hit a few more wrecks. Eventually I caught 2 Almaco jacks, on vertical jigs. Both were snagged looking at the lure.

I did see an angler on a boat catch a barely legal mahi, and heard of other kayak anglers catching peanuts in Miami and Boynton. I am guessing that if I had little baits I may have had luck, but the big runners are a tough meal for a small Mahi. On my way in from a long day of nada on bait, I connected with a sailfish on a surface trolled jack.


The sail did many jumps and then started heading out deeper. I was pretty tired from a full day of peddling and did not feeling like going through the entire process. I peddled up for a quick leader tough, then broke him off and called a day.

Replies

  • andrewthe1andrewthe1 Posts: 608 Officer

    Wow nice work, do you eat the almaco's?

    Also do you ever try to send a bait down to 90' when marking possible tuna?

    I read around the hump the drop down a three way rig with one leg coming in from mainline, a short drop to weight, and the third eye gets 30' flouro leader to live or dead bait and do well on Tunas.

    Something I would think could work elsewhere but haven't heard about it.

    Thanks for posting great pics btw

    we need more internet money
  • John McKroidJohn McKroid Posts: 1,583 Captain

    I usually throw Almacos back and eat Blackfins. But given I had no fish in the frig., and the Blackfin were not cooperating, I fillet an Almaco. I normally slow troll one bait on the surface, and a second down deep. If I see fish at a specific depth, I set the down rigger lead at that depth. With the down rigger bait at the depth of the fish marks, I typically have better luck catching tuna on the vertical jigs.

  • stc1993stc1993 Albany, GA Carrabelle, FLPosts: 4,552 Captain

    That looks like a long paddle to shore. That looked like a nice sail from the pictures.

  • John McKroidJohn McKroid Posts: 1,583 Captain

    @stc1993 said:
    That looks like a long paddle to shore. That looked like a nice sail from the pictures.

    Thanks, the peddle ashore was about 45 minutes. It's good exercise. My biggest concern out here is getting hit by an irresponsible boater.

  • krashkrash Posts: 578 Officer

    Question for offshore peddle guys... I know/think the Hobie has a setting where the flippers are both flat up against the hull...

    What do you guys do when beaching the kayak on the return ?

    My little experience with returning to a beach in any surf, paddle kayak or SUP only, is that the last coupe dozen feet to the shore landing can be a rapidly changing non-stop with little control before the kayak is washed up on the beach.

    Old Fugger who just likes to fish
  • andrewthe1andrewthe1 Posts: 608 Officer

    @John McKroid said:
    I usually throw Almacos back and eat Blackfins. But given I had no fish in the frig., and the Blackfin were not cooperating, I fillet an Almaco. I normally slow troll one bait on the surface, and a second down deep. If I see fish at a specific depth, I set the down rigger lead at that depth. With the down rigger bait at the depth of the fish marks, I typically have better luck catching tuna on the vertical jigs.

    Very cool thanks John, my only success on blackfin has been on the jigs too, so I guess I will stick with that next time I go(hopefully middle March). Thanks for posting keeps the dream alive for us north florida desk jockeys, it is at least 30+ miles to get into that type of fishing!

    we need more internet money
  • John McKroidJohn McKroid Posts: 1,583 Captain

    @andrewthe1 said:

    Very cool thanks John, my only success on blackfin has been on the jigs too, so I guess I will stick with that next time I go(hopefully middle March). Thanks for posting keeps the dream alive for us north florida desk jockeys, it is at least 30+ miles to get into that type of fishing!

    Glad to be of inspiration. Although 95% of the blackfin I have taken have been on vertical jigs, don't rule bait completely out. Most of my biggest fish(including Blackfin), have been taken on bait. Dawn and dusk or overcast days are most productive times to use bait for blackfin on the surface. My personal best was taken down deep.

  • John McKroidJohn McKroid Posts: 1,583 Captain

    @krash said:
    Question for offshore peddle guys... I know/think the Hobie has a setting where the flippers are both flat up against the hull...

    What do you guys do when beaching the kayak on the return ?

    My little experience with returning to a beach in any surf, paddle kayak or SUP only, is that the last coupe dozen feet to the shore landing can be a rapidly changing non-stop with little control before the kayak is washed up on the beach.

    Krash
    It depends on the surf conditions and which kayak an angler is using. Some guys in outbacks prefer to paddle out/In. Paddling backwards (facing the surf) coming in. Paddling in surf with a Pro Angler is not an easy option. I prefer to use the mirage drive for surf transit.

    Locking the flippers flat on the hull is a good technique during launching as it saves a few seconds of time that it would take to install the mirage, which sometimes click mounts incorrectly when one hurries the process making bigger problems. For the landing, I prefer to avoid locking the flippers flat on the hull, because even flat on the hull, I have had incidents where the masts still got a little bent due to a flipper catching on something as I dragged the kayak up the beach.

    For rough weather landings in the pro angler, I prefer to leash and pull out the mirage when I reach the surf area. I then shift to the back end of the kayak(behind the chair). With one hand leaning forward to control the steering, I then knee board the kayak to the beach. By being on the back end , It keeps the bow high. If the the kayak somehow gets knocked parallel to the waves, I jump out and pull the kayak perpendicular the the surf to prevent a flip. This method usually works well -- surfed the kayak all the way in last sailfish smackdown. Unfortunately, when I stepped off the kayak, I lost my balance, let go of the kayak and a big wave flipped my kayak in 2ft of water ! Other PA owners jumped out of their kayaks earlier, and made it into the beach without flipping by keeping their kayaks perpendicular to the surf.

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