INSANE DAY catching GIANT peacock bass

Went down to Miami this weekend to visit a buddy and do some peacock bass fishing. We went to this bridge that was absolutely loaded and probably caught 30-40 fish off one spot and giant ones to!

Replies

  • T - L U VT - L U V Posts: 187 Officer
    Nice! Miami?? I've been to that very spot and caught some good ones as well!!


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  • TeamBiteTheBaitTeamBiteTheBait Posts: 7 Greenhorn
    Nice job man! The peas have fired up lately been catching them on artificials small crappie jigs and Peacock jigs.
  • Bass2bucksBass2bucks Posts: 654 Officer
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 9,461 Admiral
    I have a question. There is a 2 fish limit on these correct? If it's an invasive species like lionfish, why is there a bag limit?
    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.
  • Reel TeaseReel Tease Posts: 657 Officer
    @soda popinski I believe it is because they were put into the south Florida waterways to attract fishermen not just locally but around the world to catch these amazonian beauty's. I believe FWC put them in themselves for this reason.
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 9,461 Admiral
    Reel Tease wrote: »
    @soda popinski I believe it is because they were put into the south Florida waterways to attract fishermen not just locally but around the world to catch these amazonian beauty's. I believe FWC put them in themselves for this reason.

    Thanks, i did not know that. I thought they were like snakeheads or lionfish and were put in illegally. Beautiful fish for sure.
    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.
  • DES51DES51 Posts: 122 Deckhand
    :beer
  • troutbomtroutbom Posts: 161 Deckhand
    Soda, the FWC planted them in the 80's to control exotics like spotted tilapia which had taken over canal systems at the expense of native species. Paul Shafland was the chief biologist, who worked long and hard to get them established. He hoped to control exotics and establish an urban fishery for peacocks. After much experimentation he succeeded beyond expectations.
  • LostconchLostconch Posts: 251 Deckhand
    I have had the same question about clown knife fish. I understood them to be an invasive, then I saw a certain fishing show doing a catch and release show about them.???
  • SizuperSizuper Posts: 293 Deckhand
    My thoughts on the invasive species is that between the Peacocks and the LMB, they're kept well enough in check. Whenever I fish S Florida, I always catch plenty of native bluegills, spotted sunnies and bowfin, so the natives are sustaining. And fact is, the invasive species have created an incredible fishery. You can catch native fish anywhere else in the country, but exotics alcan only survive in S Florida. And it's quite a thrill to catch them. The FWC would be fools to try to eradicate them. I drive down to South Florida a couple times a year to fish them, and so do many other people. That's positive economic impact that would not be there without them.
  • BackyardAnglerBackyardAngler Posts: 356 Deckhand
    Sizuper wrote: »
    My thoughts on the invasive species is that between the Peacocks and the LMB, they're kept well enough in check. Whenever I fish S Florida, I always catch plenty of native bluegills, spotted sunnies and bowfin, so the natives are sustaining. And fact is, the invasive species have created an incredible fishery. You can catch native fish anywhere else in the country, but exotics alcan only survive in S Florida. And it's quite a thrill to catch them. The FWC would be fools to try to eradicate them. I drive down to South Florida a couple times a year to fish them, and so do many other people. That's positive economic impact that would not be there without them.

    Now get some strawberries and tie into one of the giant Pacu that also haunt those waters. Looks like a 30 pound piranha. Boy do they pull.
  • sandwashsluggersandwashslugger Posts: 244 Deckhand
    Peacock bass are on-native, not invasive. Clown knife fish are invasive. To this day I still haven't found one piece of literature from FWC that you are required to kill snakeheads and clownknife fish
  • T - L U VT - L U V Posts: 187 Officer
    Peacock bass are on-native, not invasive. Clown knife fish are invasive. To this day I still haven't found one piece of literature from FWC that you are required to kill snakeheads and clownknife fish


    They recommend you killing snakeheads. They don't require you to. If they are going to be released, they need to be released at the same body of water in which they were caught from. It is illegal to transport a live snakehead. They need to be killed on the spot if you were going to keep them and take them with you.


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  • sandwashsluggersandwashslugger Posts: 244 Deckhand
    I hear people saying this but where are they getting the info from?
  • LostconchLostconch Posts: 251 Deckhand
    I am going by what is published in waterline in the charlotte county paper. The law they publish states that no invasive species shall be returned to the water alive nor should they be used for live bait.
  • gnappignappi Posts: 55 Deckhand
    I hear people saying this but where are they getting the info from?

    FWC recommends you kill them, here's a screencap from the pdf below.



    https://www.fws.gov/fisheries/ans/pdf_files/snakeheads.pdf
    Regards,

    Gary
  • gnappignappi Posts: 55 Deckhand
    As a side bar, the snake head is a great fighter, and for those of you that like to grill fish, the SH cannot be beat. The firm white meat is PERFECT for the grill, as it does not fall apart easily, and it has a very mild taste too. It comes off the bones in a fillet like any other fish, but the skin is like super glued to the meat. You need a really sharp knife to get it skinned. I bet the tough skin would be a winner in the shoe and handbag manufacturing arena.

    I used to fish exclusively for peas and LMB, but now I split my time between SH and bass.
    Regards,

    Gary
  • mpl1978mpl1978 Posts: 19 Greenhorn
    If anyone would be willing to help me out for a couple peacock spots in Hollywood or plantation area I would appreciate it. I am trying to get my 6 + 4 year old on some and haven't had any luck yet. If someone could PM me a spot or two I would appreciate it. #takeakidfishing
  • ReelChillin82ReelChillin82 Posts: 105 Deckhand
    Well I don't know "facts" but I saw a video of someone talking to an fwc officer an the officer clearly stated that it's a "must" to kill the snake head. In fact they can even site you if they catch you releasing the snakehead.
  • ReelChillin82ReelChillin82 Posts: 105 Deckhand
    On another note... Bass2Bucks you were using shiners correct ? Did you use a bubble box to keep them alive ? I've heard the shiners are fragile an do not stay alaive very long ?
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 23,346 AG
    troutbom wrote: »
    Soda, the FWC planted them in the 80's to control exotics like spotted tilapia which had taken over canal systems at the expense of native species. Paul Shafland was the chief biologist, who worked long and hard to get them established. He hoped to control exotics and establish an urban fishery for peacocks. After much experimentation he succeeded beyond expectations.

    The peacocks ARE exotics at the expense of natives. :huh I guess one has to ASSUME there were zero natives in the canals. Wonder why they didn't stock large mouth.


    Invasive species

    Peacock bass have been identified as invasive species and cause of ecological imbalances in some of their introduced areas.[5]

    Peacock bass introduction in the Rosana Reservoir and upper Paraná River, both in Brazil, resulted in a 95 percent decline in native fish density and 80 percent decline in richness in only two years.[6]

    Few measures can protect native fish once peacock bass have been introduced. Reduction in native species richness in lakes with introduced peacock bass was observed in all of the Gatun-area lakes, regardless of the presence of macrophyte refugia.[7] After initial increase in abundance, introduced peacock bass often deplete local prey and resort to cannibalism.[8][9][10]

    Florida introduction

    In 1984, after 10 years of study, Florida officials deliberately introduced butterfly peacock bass and speckled peacock bass to the southern region of that state[12] to prey on other non-native species, including the oscar (Astronotus ocellatus), Midas cichlid (Amphilophus citrinellus), and the spotted tilapia (Tilapia mariae). Their introduction also provided additional sport fishing opportunities for anglers. While the butterfly peacock bass has flourished in Florida, the speckled peacock bass has not. Therefore, it is now illegal to kill or possess speckled peacock bass in Florida. The butterfly peacock bass tend to flourish in the canals and fresh waterways throughout south Florida.

    Because of their tropical origins, peacock bass cannot tolerate low water temperatures. This has prevented them from becoming abundant in Florida outside of Palm Beach, Broward, and Miami-Dade counties.
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  • SizuperSizuper Posts: 293 Deckhand
    Good luck trying to tell a butterfly peacock from a speckled peacock in the assu color phase.
  • EBOutdoorsEBOutdoors Posts: 75 Greenhorn
    Hey guys chck out my new video.

    In this video I head down to Miami Florida in pursuit of giant peacock bass. We had a great day catching a ton of beautiful peacocks.

    [video]

    Subscribe to my channel EBOutdoors for more fishing and hunting videos around South Florida.
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