New Pass 07/29

Went out to see if we could get some snook on the early morning out going tide.. No snook, but we did get some keeper mangroves, biggest being about 13 inches, all were released. However did come across two things, one being, we couldn't keep baby Gag Grouper from eating our white bait... They were everywhere! All of them where between 6 and 10 inches..

http://imgur.com/NX20Zmd

Is this common? Do Gag's come this far inshore to breed/give birth? Did lose one big bite I couldn't turn near where all the babies were, that did get broke up on rocks, maybe a larger one nearby?

The second thing we came across was the company that is doing the dredging of the pass, they were there loading the barge with Diesel, didn't think anything of it until i looked down and saw a slick of what was diesel running right in front of us.. looked like a lot more then I would think is normal for something like this, but I am not too sure. After they finished loading the barge I saw something even more disturbing... One of the gentleman working for the company started dumping big gulps of Windex concentrate into the water to what I am guessing to dissipate the diesel "oil-slick"... Is this stuff normal? If this was done to this amount on a Saturday morning, what is going on later at night or during the week, when there would be less eyes around....?

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KSQUdus.jpg

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That being said, once the slick started the bite died until the tide switched and then it picked up again. Could have been the tide going slack, but something makes me think this amount of diesel in the area may have had something to do with it.. I tried to get the best pictures I could with my phone, didn't have the GoPro with me to make it look a little less obvious...

Sorry for the size of the images, couldn't make them smaller.

Replies

  • FS ShelbyFS Shelby Posts: 687 Officer
    Thanks for sharing with the FS forum community, I think you should report what you saw to FWC.

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  • FS ShelbyFS Shelby Posts: 687 Officer
    You might also want to contact the Florida Environmental Protection Agency to answer any questions and see if there are any possible action they may be able to take. I don’t know the regulations regarding a commercial operation such as dredging, but the EPA could definitely answer your questions.

    Here's some of their phone numbers:

    Regulatory Programs 850-245-2036
    Air Resource Management 850-717-9000
    Water Resource Management 850-245-8336
    Waste Management 850-245-8705
    Siting Coordination 850-717-9000
    Florida Geological Survey 850-617-0300
    District Offices
    Northwest 850-595-8300
    Northeast 904-256-1700
    Central 407-897-4100
    Southwest 813-470-5700
    Southeast 561-681-6600
    South 239-344-5600
  • whipachawwhipachaw Posts: 505 Officer
    Chances are it was something to eat or disperse the fuel. They used something like that at a marina in NC on one of the lakes up there. I think they said it was a enzyme that breaks it down. It's probably a requirement and the guy was actually doing his job.
  • snipes27snipes27 Posts: 99 Greenhorn
    when I first saw him doing it, I figured that was the case, until I saw the bottle with the Windex logo, and I was 10 feet from him and could smell the infamous Windex/ammonia smell. That is what peaked my interest.
  • LastCheersLastCheers Posts: 26 Greenhorn
    This is handled by the Coast Guard. In fact everyone including recreational boaters are supposed to report any fuel spillage to the USCG. Doubt they can do anything legally now but they will go talk to them and also inspect their boom spill kit.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  • snipes27snipes27 Posts: 99 Greenhorn
    LastCheers wrote: »
    This is handled by the Coast Guard. In fact everyone including recreational boaters are supposed to report any fuel spillage to the USCG. Doubt they can do anything legally now but they will go talk to them and also inspect their boom spill kit.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    thanks, I emailed them just now with all the pictures... Maybe something will come of this..
  • BinderBinder Posts: 3,857 Captain
    This past week we were fighting the wind so we hung out on the beach on the north side of Big Carlos pass by the dredges.

    We saw fuel in the water there as well.
  • snipes27snipes27 Posts: 99 Greenhorn
    I contacted the local Coast Guard yesterday morning per Last Cheers info... They got back to me within 2 hours, one of the Privates called me from his personal cell from the location, stating that they do not see any in the water at this time. No one was at the location so they could not check the barge, but they will keep an eye on the situation and their craft. So we will see.
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