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Kayak: Trying to Decide on my first

kellerclkellercl Posts: 6,341 Admiral
So I was eye balling either the Moken 10 Lite or Lure 10. I have never owned a kayak and I am not really sure what would be best. I will be fishing mostly brackish water type situations, meaning fairly calm waters. Best that I can tell the Moken would be easier to paddle. But the Lure (given the width) would be more stable. I even got the impression with Lure it would be possible to stand when need be, given how wide it is. But again, I hear it would be tough to paddle and getting it on/off the car would be more difficult. In terms of safety when transporting, what is more likely to have issues with tie downs? A heavy wide kayak or a lighter narrow kayak? I can talk myself into either situations. I like the concept of the seat/chair on the Lure, but I've also read sitting up high really kills stability.

Thanks in advance. :)


“When you're good at something, you'll tell everyone. When you're great at something, they'll tell you.”

-Walter Payton

Replies

  • Android77Android77 Posts: 498 Deckhand
    Don't get a 10 foot kayak they don't track very well when paddling. Don't buy into the myth that for smaller waters you need a short kayak. If you ever try to venture out a little further you will be highly disappointed. It's better to buy a good used one rather than a poor new one.
  • kellerclkellercl Posts: 6,341 Admiral
    Android77 wrote: »
    Don't get a 10 foot kayak they don't track very well when paddling. Don't buy into the myth that for smaller waters you need a short kayak. If you ever try to venture out a little further you will be highly disappointed. It's better to buy a good used one rather than a poor new one.

    Excuse my ignorance, I am really new to this, but I will be putting the kayak up on a thule roof rack that is on a Mazda 5. The Mazda 5 is roughly 15 feet long. I was aiming towards 10 ft, because it seemed safer for transportation compared to a 12 foot. Is that not really true?

    Edit
    Another way of asking is what percent of the kayak needs to be over the roof/rack and how much can overhang the hood?


    “When you're good at something, you'll tell everyone. When you're great at something, they'll tell you.”

    -Walter Payton
  • kellerclkellercl Posts: 6,341 Admiral
    As more background, I was thinking 10 ft would be fine, given I am 5'10" and weight about 170 lbs. Does that matter when discussing kayak length?


    “When you're good at something, you'll tell everyone. When you're great at something, they'll tell you.”

    -Walter Payton
  • Android77Android77 Posts: 498 Deckhand
    10 foot kayaks don't paddle straight. I know a guy that puts a 14 foot Pro Angler on a little car and he has no problem. You will be a lot more comfortable in a longer kayak and won't feel so crowded. Don't know where you live but there is a tournament in Pompano Saturday and you could see a lot of diffrent models in one place if you could get there. Launch is at 7:00 if you get there about 6:00 it would really help you make a better decision.
  • AaronCannonAaronCannon Northwest ArkansasPosts: 863 Officer
    Nobody lifts a pro angler, no problem...
    That said get a 12, or 14 if you can stand the weight. Extra 10lbs is usually worth it, especially if your already thinking about standing up.

    I've run my cuda14 on top of an Element, racks are only a couple feet apart, no issues on trip from NwArkansas to Tampa. Never saw point in bowline/streamlines.
    Just crosstied the yak in the Honda cradles.
    The rifle itself has no moral stature, since it has no will of its own. Naturally, it may be used by evil men for evil purposes, but there are more good men than evil, and while the latter cannot be persuaded to the path of righteousness by propaganda, they can certainly be corrected by good men with rifles.
    Jeff Cooper
  • Fireman BillFireman Bill Posts: 578 Officer
    Do not buy a 10 ft kayak. It is way to small and if you are interested in fishing you will have no place for your stuff. I like 14 ft kayaks for fishing. I bought a small one for my son (age 10) when we stated kayak fishing in 6 months I sold the 10 footer and got a 14 ft kayak for him.

    Fireman Bill
  • kellerclkellercl Posts: 6,341 Admiral
    Wow, I am so glad I asked. Thanks guys, for saving me from making a bad decision. Much appreciated. I'll start looking more in the 12-14 ft category.


    “When you're good at something, you'll tell everyone. When you're great at something, they'll tell you.”

    -Walter Payton
  • sp00n-sp00n- Posts: 104 Deckhand
    My 12'4" kayak seems like too much for most of my fishing, and my 10' seems a little small. If I did have a truck, I would use the 12 footer all the time, but since I dont, and seeing how almost all my fishing is semi protected gulf inshore waters, I find myself using the smaller one most of the time. Money is probably a factor here too - to some, they can spend 300 bucks, others dont blink at 1800 for a kayak. My friend just got one of these - when I saw it during a recent trip I fell in love. It is the "biggest" 10 footer I have seen. Wide, yet light, GREAT design, quality craftmanship. (If (when!) I do get rid of my older yaks and settle down with one new one, this will be it) https://www.perceptionkayaks.com/us/products/pescador-pro-100
    He got his at 20% off (sale) and it came with a free paddle and vest ($580 total) from ****'s Sporting Goods (I think). Anyways, hope this helps!
  • krashkrash Posts: 685 Officer
    Look into the Tarpon 120, or the same but older model molds the Pescador 12 (West Marine Pompano 120)... these are good sot kayaks for fishing, paddling and all around.

    I carry a 15'4", a 14'4" canoe, or 12'6" paddleboard on the top of my Honda 2dr Civic, 3rd Civic all 2dr's for 2001 -2012.. I've alos been through a 15' ScupperPro and a couple Mohawk and Indian River canoes over the past 16 years of paddle fishing... never had a problem carrying them on the roof, just make sure you use not only cross straps/lines and Bow and Stern lines to secure the kayak when in transport... I tarvel generally anywhere fomr 45 minutes to 3 hours to get to the water at hi-way+ speeds.
    Old Fugger who just likes to fish
  • quatinquatin Posts: 598 Officer
    13'' is the sweet spot for a general purpose kayak. You should figure out where you want to fish and what you want to fish for. If you're fishing for bones/reds on the flats, being able to stand up and sight cast is a big deal. If you're going around the open bay on grass flats jigging for trout, you might need a faster kayak to cover some ground. Honestly, the pedal drives like Hobie really start to shine when you're looking at wider kayaks.
  • Alex from GAAlex from GA Posts: 1,511 Captain
    One of my fishing buddys has an Ocean Kayak Caper and he stands most of the time.
  • Grady-ladyGrady-lady east of the river, west of the woodsPosts: 5,282 Admiral
    I fished from borrowed kayaks for about three years before I bought my own. Most of my fishing is done in inshore backwaters, so fairly calm but still subject to tidal flow and wind.

    Fished from almost everything including a 9.5' cheapie to an expensive 14' all decked out and various canoes. Did not feel comfortable in the 14 footer - for a 5' nothing grandmother it felt very tippy. The guy who owned it is about your size, in his mid-30's and loves it.

    I ended up with - https://www.perceptionkayaks.com/us/products?family%5B%5D=204&activity%5B%5D=24&type%5B%5D=28 and it's great! Not too heavy, @ 65 lbs I can get it into the back of a p/up without help, carefully. Very stable, two level seating, beamy and we've had bass boats with a lower freeboard, lol. (makes it a little more susceptible to wind tho') I wanted molded footrests as opposed to the adjustable pedals (which break) and the anchor system is great - use it all the time. Though it doesn't track as well as a sleeker boat would, it handles a light chop easily.

    On sale at ****'s for less than $500 - and I think that includes the anchor and trolley - a must and a big + for me. Read the reviews (on ****'s website), I pretty much agree with most of them. Not a perfect boat by any means but I absolutely love mine, especially for the price.

    Doesn't come with a clip on padded seat - but I haven't needed one yet. I like being able to scoot from the low seat to the high seat without encumbrance.

    Good luck!
    I find my peace out on the sand...Beside the sea, not beyond or behind. R.A. Britt

  • dcrdcr Posts: 365 Deckhand
    My 2¢.
    (1) Longer is better.
    (2) Three years ago everybody on here told me not to get a kayak less than 12'.

    I got a 9'7" Hobie Sport with mirage drive and a rudder. I got the shorter one because I could easily lift, transport, and store it.
    Yes, the few times I've been in 13" of water and had to pull up my rudder and use a paddle, the thing tracked like a berserk tank.
    I will never take it offshore, but have been out about a mile in the Gulf, Atlantic, and Lake Michigan.

    All said, you are better off with a 12-14 footer, but not as bad off as some would think with only a 10 footer. Go to a demo day and decide for yourself.
  • Wra22Wra22 Posts: 201 Deckhand
    Think about: how you will store it, transport it and carry it. Hobies are sliippery and heavy. Using your legs is easier than paddling and keeps hands free to fish. I use an old Prowler 13. Good offshore and inshore. Good all around but Not the best at anything. I would not go larger because of weight. I cannot stand up in it. It is good in rough seas. I would buy used. It either floats or does not. Spend money on quality seat. I sit in mine eight hours at a time. I would definitely get a rudder. You need rod holders.
  • jcanracerjcanracer Posts: 4,344 Moderator
    Kellercl you have gotten some good advice thus far.
    I had the Hobie Sport like DCR had and I did inshore and offshore with it. However, the only reason that the 9.5 foot Hobie works (and probably the only reason a 10ft Native Slayer Propel as well) is because it has propulsion and a rudder. When you have to pull up the drive and rudder in those short kayaks, you get a sense of how horrible it is to PADDLE them. Now, that's not to say they are worthless, in fact I still wish I had the Hobie Sport for short trout trips or for when my nephews/nieces come to visit; no what you realize is that a 10 ft kayak is just not going to give you the options [or confidence] that a larger kayak would.

    If you are worried about transportation, do not worry too much; I carried my Revo11 on my Toyota Matrix before I upgraded to a Revo13 and a bigger car (Mazda CX5). Worry more about where/how you will store the kayak at home. Measure out your garage, or patio, or storage area so that you can determine the largest size kayak that will fit. Then think of the weight (which is why I never went with the heavy Pro Angler). Go to a Demo-Day and try out whatever kayaks you have then narrowed it down to. Good luck.
    Hobie Kayak angler for life!
  • dcrdcr Posts: 365 Deckhand
    And it fits very easily in the bed of a pickup with the tailgate down. I lift it all of 3'.
  • sparse greysparse grey Posts: 1,751 Captain
    DCR Great ideas & pics. However, check the line on your pulley system.
    Ron Conner Release the fish, keep the memories. Once a Knight is enough.
  • dcrdcr Posts: 365 Deckhand
    DCR Great ideas & pics. However, check the line on your pulley system.
    Yeah. It looks 10x worse than it really is. I've got second lines for redundancy and will be upgrading once a new car is going under there.
  • jcanracerjcanracer Posts: 4,344 Moderator
    dcr you're making me miss my Sport! That thing was like an Outback Jr!
    Hobie Kayak angler for life!
  • slapshotslapshot Posts: 172 Officer
    My wife and I just bought kayaks. We tried out different size Ocean Kayaks ranging from 11'-13'. Like others said, the shorter kayaks do not track straight at all. My wife didn't like the 11' or 12', and liked the 13'. She said it was easier because it tracked nearly straight all the time. I would agree with her. She decided on a Prowler 13 and I went with a Trident 13, they both are 13' and change. We've taken them out a couple times so far and we're both happy with our decisions. If the weather holds out, the first fishing trip is Friday morning. I can't comment on roof carrying them, we have an F-250 and they go in the bed.
  • krashkrash Posts: 685 Officer
    good choice slapshot... congrats and enjoy
    Old Fugger who just likes to fish
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