Home Conservation Forums

Fishing/bait live talopias fresh and saltwater?

Can I use live talopias as bait in fresh or saltwater?
Triton 1870 Bay Sport, 115 merc. 4/stroke,
Fish Shallow saltwater, lakes central Fl. And Lake Oconee Ga.
Live in Lakeland

Replies

  • SchmidtySchmidty Posts: 6,806 Admiral
    There being no size or bag limits on them...sure...why not...
  • kmagnusskmagnuss Posts: 3,237 Captain
    I remember seeing somewhere that you couldn't use tilapia as bait in some bodies of water but my memory on it is hazy... could be wrong.
    Tarpon... everything else is just bait.
    Captain Keith - Crooked Rod Charters
  • gatorhookgatorhook Posts: 663 Officer
    Why couldn't you? It's an invasive species that shouldn't be protected. They have replaced shellcrackers, bluegills, etc by out numbering them in their habitat. It was another fish farm catastrophe. If you can find/catch some Mayans which are also invasives, they are Snook candy!
  • Use of exotics as bait is prohibited in Florida pursuant to FAC 68-5

    From the 2015 FWC fishing regulations

    qvF3zZQ.png?1
    "If I can't win, I won't play." - Doris Colecchio.

    "Well Gary, the easiest way to look tall is to stand in a room full of short people." - Curtis Bostick

    "All these forums, with barely any activity, are like a neglected old cemetery that no one visits anymore."- anonymouse
  • SchmidtySchmidty Posts: 6,806 Admiral
    I guess that I could understand not being able to use them as bait decades ago, but now they do appear to be just about everywhere...so I would doubt that you can't everywhere...but maybe....

    I someone a great big giant weedy muck pond that could get a good flow through there...a fell could get rich raising them....
  • The idea is not to protect them because they are rare, which they aren't. The concept is to prevent them from populating an area and overtaking the native species.

    You need a permit to possess them (transport , sale etc.) , according to the FAC. And accordingly you cannot use them as bait, since that would be reintroducing them.

    You may remove as many as you wish without restriction. Putting them back in the water risks their release and potential to breed.

    Now will you be cited for doing that? I don't know if a FWC LEO would even know what one looks like. But if you don't want to risk damage to native fisheries, its probably a good idea to use something else, which will do no harm.
    "If I can't win, I won't play." - Doris Colecchio.

    "Well Gary, the easiest way to look tall is to stand in a room full of short people." - Curtis Bostick

    "All these forums, with barely any activity, are like a neglected old cemetery that no one visits anymore."- anonymouse
  • SchmidtySchmidty Posts: 6,806 Admiral
    "Fishon"...

    I that at one time there was a list of fish that you couldn't use as bait...so I looked it up...

    " Besides Peacock Bass (game fish) and Triploid Grass Carp (stocked for vegetation control); all other non-native fish must be either consumed or disposed of. There are no bag or size limits and they can be caught using any legal method. However, game fish may not be used as bait. These fish wreak havoc on Florida’s freshwater systems and must never be released back into the water. This is a list of them:
    •Flathead Catfish
    •Blue Catfish
    •Jaguar Guapote
    •Mayan Cichlid
    •Oscar
    •Common Carp
    •Yellow Perch
    •Blue Tilapia

    These are the Rules and Regulations for Freshwater Fishing in Florida that will never change. Please visit the website of the Florida Fishing and Wildlife Conservation Commission for the latest information."

    The way it reads it makes it sound like if you catch one you should kill it as well.

    Hope this helps...
  • gatorhookgatorhook Posts: 663 Officer
    The idea is not to protect them because they are rare, which they aren't. The concept is to prevent them from populating an area and overtaking the native species.

    Too late, these non-indigenous species have already taken over South FL and have made it here in Central. I've caught Mayans even in the Banana. If it weren't for the stocking of freshwater indigenous species there wouldn't be any left. We need a BIG FREEZE and maybe it will put a dent in the the aggressive invasive species, that don't play nice and constantly reproduce.
  • dragon baitdragon bait Posts: 9,794 Admiral
    The idea is not to protect them because they are rare, which they aren't. The concept is to prevent them from populating an area and overtaking the native species.

    You need a permit to possess them (transport , sale etc.) , according to the FAC. And accordingly you cannot use them as bait, since that would be reintroducing them.

    You may remove as many as you wish without restriction. Putting them back in the water risks their release and potential to breed.

    Now will you be cited for doing that? I don't know if a FWC LEO would even know what one looks like. But if you don't want to risk damage to native fisheries, its probably a good idea to use something else, which will do no harm.

    Special Note: Possession and transport of live tilapia in Florida is illegal without a special permit (except blue tilapia); can only be possessed if dead, so anglers wanting to eat this fish should immediately place them on ice.

    http://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/profiles/freshwater/nonnatives/spotted-tilapia/
  • SizuperSizuper Posts: 293 Deckhand
    Schmidty wrote: »
    " Besides Peacock Bass (game fish) and Triploid Grass Carp (stocked for vegetation control); all other non-native fish must be either consumed or disposed of. There are no bag or size limits and they can be caught using any legal method. However, game fish may not be used as bait. These fish wreak havoc on Florida’s freshwater systems and must never be released back into the water. This is a list of them:
    •Flathead Catfish
    •Blue Catfish
    •Jaguar Guapote
    •Mayan Cichlid
    •Oscar
    •Common Carp
    •Yellow Perch
    •Blue Tilapia

    That's a bizarre list.

    Both the blue catfish and the flathead catfish are native Florida species, so they shouldn't be on any list of invasive species. Blue tilapia were introduced on purpose in most areas as vegetation control and forage for native predatory fish. Other than a random stray coming down the Apalachicola River, Yellow Perch don't exist in Florida except in a rather unique bog Dead Lakes in the panhandle. And the only way they can survive the summer heat that far south is the cold spring in Stone Mill creek, where they congregate (but still in small numbers).

    Inclusion of those fish is made more strange by the exclusion of really detrimental invasives like the snakehead and the walking catfish (not to mention all the other cichlids).


    Anyway, to dd more info to the responses to TOP, the primary reason they don't let you use invasive species for bait is that an officer has no way of knowing if you caught the fish at the location you're fishing, if you brought them from another location, or if you are using unwanted aquarium fish as bait. This is standard practice in every state to prevent any confusion or further introduction of invasives.

    You can *probably* get away with using one invasive as bait at a time, meaning don't catch them and keep them alive in the bait bucket. Using/possessing one at a time will likely get off with a warning, but once you have one or more in the live well or bait bucket, you could be considered an illegal species importer.
  • mplspugmplspug Palmetto FloridaPosts: 14,068 AG
    That's a pretty dangerous 'probably'. It's probably just better to use legal bait.

    Flatheads are not native to Florida. Blue cats were native to a few bodies of water in Florida, but the point is that they don't want them to spread to other parts of the state where they are not native.
    Just dropping grenades in OT
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 14,980 AG
    We used to use shiners as snook bait in brackish water at a spillway in Boca, worked very well.
    Yesterday's memories are not today's reality
  • SizuperSizuper Posts: 293 Deckhand
    mplspug wrote: »
    That's a pretty dangerous 'probably'. It's probably just better to use legal bait.

    Flatheads are not native to Florida. Blue cats were native to a few bodies of water in Florida, but the point is that they don't want them to spread to other parts of the state where they are not native.

    Yeah good point. Even though they're native, they want them confined to their native rivers.

    My bad with the flathead. You're right they're not indigenous to Florida, but they migrated naturally from Alabama and Georgia without being illegally introduced by man. Which I was considering native - which they technically aren't.
  • mplspugmplspug Palmetto FloridaPosts: 14,068 AG
    I wish flatheads were native though! Did a lot of fishing for them back home.
    Just dropping grenades in OT
Sign In or Register to comment.