Dam breaching explosion - video

WaterEngineerWaterEngineer Posts: 24,415 AG
I have done dam engineering on/off throughout my career so I find this pretty impressive.

It is also interesting:

a) that they could get a permit to actually remove the structure
b) the willingness is there to remove it
c) that the dam can be breached and not totally take out the channel below the dam.

With that said the USFWS is under a mandate to restore some Pacific Salmon runs. Completing that work includes removing some dams.

When the water jet is producing between 5 and 6 thousand horsepower, by my rough calculations.

That is before the channel below the dam fills with water.

Hydraulically, there is a lot going on.

Also, check out the amount of sediment that filled the dam in the last 60 years.

Fair warning: the warning horn at the beginning of the video is annoying.

Enjoy.
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Replies

  • RRRRRR Posts: 8,218 Officer
    I bet that soil left in the lake bed after the
    draw-down is rich and fertile.

    I would love to have some of it for may lawn.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • WaterEngineerWaterEngineer Posts: 24,415 AG
    Probably, but it will eventually make it down stream. That is one of the reasons I am impressed a permit was granted - the sediment load suspended in the water is one of the parameters I am sure is being watched.
  • RRRRRR Posts: 8,218 Officer
    the time-lapse shots at the end are incredible

    thanks for sharing it
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • td.td. Posts: 4,695 Captain
    That is one of the first of many dams that will be removed in the PNW. Outside of the major dams on the Columbia and Snake rivers, there are lots of smaller ones, many that are around 80-100 years old. Instead of bringing them up to modern day standards and meeting the fish bypass regulations, many will be removed. The largest and most significant project that has been discussed as long as I can remember is the Elwha River dams. There are two dams on it that have virtually eliminated all salmon from the river. It used to have Kings in it that rivaled the Kenai River in Alaska for size, in the 80 lb plus range. They anticipate it will fully recover over the next couple of decades after the dams are removed. THe good news, they began the removal process of both dams in Sept. The area the Elwha drains and runs through is amazing forest (great bigfoot hiding area), something we've wanted to fish for as long as I can remember.

    http://www.nps.gov/olym/naturescience/elwha-ecosystem-restoration.htm
  • BibBib Posts: 2,357 Captain
    Will the new flow eventually move that sediment along, or will it stay and form banks?
  • td.td. Posts: 4,695 Captain
    They will perform a bunch of reparation to take care of what is left of it. Since the PNW is moving in to the rainy season, a lot of it will be flushed into the stream flow and ultimately end up down stream and the Columbia will flush it out to the ocean. That's what would have naturally occurred had there been no dam.
  • Triple Threat 33TTriple Threat 33T Port CanaveralPosts: 18,669 Admin
    Reminds me of my McRib episode last week
    "Lord, hold our troops in your loving hands. Protect them as they protect us. Bless them and their families for the selfless acts they perform for us in our time of need. Amen."
  • WaterEngineerWaterEngineer Posts: 24,415 AG
    Bib:

    Taildance got this one almost right in post #7. Not a bad try for an amateur.

    Yes, some will get flushed - thus the water quality issue.

    Sediment is a detroyer of salmon eggs, bottom insects and some plants, in the river.

    Other parts of the sediment will be sloped back and planed to 'stabilize' it.

    And, no it is not what would have happened naturally without the dam. Sediment comes from disturbed lands - in this case likely clear cut logging - so no the sedimentation is not 'natural.
  • FletchFletch Merritt Island, FLPosts: 2,418 Moderator
    Way cool...
    Sediment comes from disturbed lands - in this case likely clear cut logging - so no the sedimentation is not 'natural.

    I have one issue with statements like this - they exclude humans as a part of nature. If it is within our nature to construct dams (or cars, planes, roads, buildings, etc), then it is "natural"..... In a sense.
    "Ninety percent I'll spend on good times, women and Irish whiskey. The other ten percent, I'll probably waste..."
    -- Tug McGraw on getting a raise

    Get Down Fishing Charters - Port Canaveral, Florida
  • td.td. Posts: 4,695 Captain
    Sediment only destroy things on the bottom if it settles. Until then, it's suspended dirt...;) Dam engineers...

    I was being nice to you and your Furd, hens. The yota would eat it alive.
  • WaterEngineerWaterEngineer Posts: 24,415 AG
    td. wrote: »
    Sediment only destroy things on the bottom if it settles. Until then, it's suspended dirt...;) Dam engineers...

    Errrrrr, wrong again Taildance. Thanks for playing.

    First let's call it suspended sediment, which is harmful in the ways that follow, which is not an exhaustive list:

    1. Abrasive to hydroturbine machinery and pipes.
    2. difficult to handle and treat when water is diverted for water supply.
    3. creates more abrasion in fast reaches of a river to bridge peirs (concrete cover on reinforcing steel) and river bottom (more scour.)
    4. Fish don't like sediment load getting in their gills.

    Ya, dam(n) engineers........
  • td.td. Posts: 4,695 Captain
    Errrrrr, wrong again Taildance. Thanks for playing.

    First let's call it suspended sediment, which is harmful in the ways that follow, which is not an exhaustive list:

    1. Abrasive to hydroturbine machinery and pipes.
    2. difficult to handle and treat when water is diverted for water supply.
    3. creates more abrasion in fast reaches of a river to bridge peirs (concrete cover on reinforcing steel) and river bottom (more scour.)
    4. Fish don't like sediment load getting in their gills.

    Ya, dam(n) engineers........

    See, here's the problem with Dam engineers, you can't joke with them without them having to explain themselves.
  • WaterEngineerWaterEngineer Posts: 24,415 AG
    Ya, I'm an old nerd geek with no friends.
  • pupraiserpupraiser Posts: 10,261 AG

    And, no it is not what would have happened naturally without the dam. Sediment comes from disturbed lands - in this case likely clear cut logging - so no the sedimentation is not 'natural.

    Explain the Grand Canyon. Where did all that rock go?
  • pupraiserpupraiser Posts: 10,261 AG
    Fletch wrote: »
    Way cool...



    I have one issue with statements like this - they exclude humans as a part of nature. If it is within our nature to construct dams (or cars, planes, roads, buildings, etc), then it is "natural"..... In a sense.

    Beavers build dams.
  • WaterEngineerWaterEngineer Posts: 24,415 AG
    pupraiser wrote: »
    Explain the Grand Canyon. Where did all that rock go?

    It went to the Golfo de California.
  • PhescadorPhescador Posts: 3,816 Officer
    uhh, huh huh...excuse me. Is this a god dam? Where can I get some dam bait?
    Ewe Inn Joy Mice Elf.
  • pupraiserpupraiser Posts: 10,261 AG
    It went to the Golfo de California.

    As sediment. From undisturbed land.
  • td.td. Posts: 4,695 Captain
    pupraiser wrote: »
    As sediment. From undisturbed land.

    I didn't want to point that out to an engineer pup, but nice work. Do you have your seatbelt on?
  • pupraiserpupraiser Posts: 10,261 AG
    pupraiser wrote: »
    As sediment. From undisturbed land.

    :tap: :tap: :tap: Testing 1, 2...testing 1,2...tesssssssssssssst 1,2 . Breaker 1-9.
  • WaterEngineerWaterEngineer Posts: 24,415 AG
    pupraiser wrote: »
    As sediment. From undisturbed land.

    Channel erosion - not upland erosion - as is the case with the processes in the NW.
  • captinmitchcaptinmitch Posts: 5,807 Admiral
    td. wrote: »
    See, here's the problem with Dam engineers, you can't joke with them without them having to explain themselves.
    That's cuz they're all bottled up.
  • sharkatak1089sharkatak1089 Posts: 6,407 Officer
    fake.
    I am choice.
    Please don't try to interject with reason, it only further confuses the matter.
  • pupraiserpupraiser Posts: 10,261 AG
    Channel erosion - not upland erosion - as is the case with the processes in the NW.

    So channel erosion = ok but upland erosion <> ok?

    Anyhow, after a few years those lakes will be grown over and they'll be a nice little river there. I'd be mad if I had lake front property though.
  • StillinscrubsStillinscrubs Posts: 1,844 Officer
    Contamination in the sediment is often the biggest barrier to removing dams. There is a huge push to remove all dams in the Pacific northwest as they have decimated salmon, steelhead, sturgeon, and lamprey stocks.

    Want to read about the struggles look to the 5 lower snake river dams and the elwah river dam on the Olympic pennisula.
  • td.td. Posts: 4,695 Captain
    Contamination in the sediment is often the biggest barrier to removing dams. There is a huge push to remove all dams in the Pacific northwest as they have decimated salmon, steelhead, sturgeon, and lamprey stocks.

    Want to read about the struggles look to the 5 lower snake river dams and the elwah river dam on the Olympic pennisula.

    Thank you for that. Is there an echo in here?
  • StillinscrubsStillinscrubs Posts: 1,844 Officer
    Sorry I must have flipped past it on my iPhone. I blame steve jobs for this.....

    You left out the steelhead, sturgeon, and lampreys. It needed to be said.
  • td.td. Posts: 4,695 Captain
    Lol, just messing...
  • StillinscrubsStillinscrubs Posts: 1,844 Officer
    td. wrote: »
    Lol, just messing...

    I'm not, that jobs guy is a bassturd and his products cause me nothing but headaches, he better fix them.
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