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Brag About Your Yak

Alrighty guys and gals excited to say finally looking to upgrade from my trident 13. I have had so many awesome days out on the water with this vessel but my needs and ambitions are changing. With that being said I am looking to hear your guys reviews, experiences, stories, and recommendations. Here is my criteria.

1. Going to be used for both offshore and backcountry (speed is key)

2. Gotta be at least 13.5' long

3. Need an oversized scupper to accept dragonfly transducer

4. Main deck thru hull storage (lots)

5. Finally, don't want to spend more than $1,800

From the extensive research I have done online, I think I have narrowed down my choices to the jackson cuda 14, jackson kracken 15.5, ocean kayak ultra 4.7 or 4.3, native slayer 14. However, depending on what feedback I get I may have to rethink some things. Look forward to seeing your guys responses. Tight lines.

Replies

  • krhyde1066krhyde1066 Posts: 78 Greenhorn
    Just save more money, use your current kayak for a while. Then choose between the Hobie Pro Angler 12, the Hobie Pro Angler 14. If you don't want to go that way, they choose between the Hobie Revoulution or the Hobie Outback.! Sorry Troutman. I couldn't resist it.
    I spent a long time with a cheap Kayak that I adapted to fishing. I saved and scrimped and saved. Finally I was able to buy the Hobie Outback. Apart from getting married and having my son, it was the best day of my life. Being able to to pedal while using your hands, changes the whole game, brother.
    Yours Sincerely Karl Hyde
  • avidone1avidone1 Posts: 139 Officer
    Hobies are great if your young and strong. If however you are a senior citizen with the accompanying arthritis issues then a lightweight kayak is a must for continuing your enjoyment into your 70's and beyond.
    Some of the newer yaks are losing weight, but the eddyline's have been designed for lightweight paddling since their inception.
    I use the Caribbean angler 12 which weighs a skimpy 45 pounds, tracks like a dream and is stabile, and comfortable enough to fish out of for hours. It fits nicely in the back of my SUV, so I don't ever have to lift it over my head. Perfect
  • kayakerinkeywestkayakerinkeywest Posts: 576 Officer
    I would also have to vote for one of the Hobies if you are really looking for an impactful upgrade. The Trident is rock solid. Upgrading to another paddle kayak your basically paying for an unscratched kayak with a lawn chair seat. I still love my 2010 WS Tarpon but for serious fishing I use the Hobie Adventure. You didn't specify what you are using it for. If you are not paddling far and primarily flats, then paddle kayak. Anything else, Hobie. It's not that the Hobie can't do those things, but you would be paying a lot of money and not using the features. The other factor is what Avidone1 eluded to. If you have physical limitations then that would sway the decision as well.
    Youtube - KEY WEST KAYAK FISHING https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkGY6yxE8kogYHKXisMhA2w
    All About The Bait Store - http://www.allaboutthebait.com/
  • troutman97troutman97 Posts: 81 Deckhand
    I had a feeling the Hobie was going to come up. Maybe that's the way to go. I do think that hands free pedaling is going to be an absolute game changer. Obviously the only obstacle would be the funds situation but that could be overcome in time. One thing that I really do like about the smaller profile kayaks is the ability to launch in some hairy places (under bridges, roadside canals, etc). Maybe I'll just have to keep the trident for those applications. Thanks for the feedback guys I appreciate it.
  • krashkrash Posts: 686 Officer
    I had an OK ScupperPro, predecessor to the Tridents or Ultra's, and would have never upgraded as of todays market IMO has not much better to offer. I had to give it up after heart surgery and go lighter, even though the SP was only 55#, but that kayak would go anywhere anytime, paddled very well, and would take any water you wished to paddle in except maybe river rapids running.
    I look back now 3 years later and kick myself for selling it.
    Old Fugger who just likes to fish
  • davederbdavederb Posts: 887 Officer
    My .02 after owning several paddle yaks including a Prowler 13 and a Jackson Cuda 14...my Hobie PA12 was a game changer in my book. I can cover tons more water with ease and my rod is in my hand all day. Haha I'm cracking up just tying that. Seriously..windy days dont phase me anymore as a few flutters of the pedals and I'm right back out of the mangroves and the rod never left my hand to grab a paddle. Huge advantage for me. Yes, heavy and bulky, but I wouldnt trade it for any other yak at this point. Expensive, yes, but very much worth it! Save yer pennies and you wont be sorry!
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC] Air Force Veteran 93'-00' ~621st TALCE~

    2017 & 2014 Hobie Pro Angler 12’s
  • jakejake Posts: 326 Deckhand
    I have a Cuda 14. One of the first ones, 2012. I know they've made some changes but nothing groundbreaking.

    The good - Stable as they come, I can flyfish and even throw a cast next off it and never feel tippy. The seat is very comfortable and the High-Low options come in very handy. I usually leave it high unless I'm paddling upwind.

    The bad - It's heavy, it's not very fast. A full day paddling will wear you out, but those are the trade offs with being able to stand. I wish there was a better storage option. I have considered cutting the main hatch and putting a piano hinge on the lower 1/3 as some have done to make accessing things stored in the hatch easier to get to. I would like to have something like Wilderness systems put on the Tarpons - the little between-your-legs hatch for your phone or small items like that.

    At the time, it was one of a few kayaks made to stand up on. Now every company has a few that are geared towards standing/sightcasting. The seat is another thing that was rare when I bought it, but is now commonplace on kayaks.

    If the Cuda 12 was around when I bought mine, I probably would have gotten that. I kick around the idea of buying a Tarpon 120 for days where I want speed/agility more than stability.

    I think the Cuda 14 is the best "all-around" kayak. Kind of jack of all trades, master of none.
  • kayakerinkeywestkayakerinkeywest Posts: 576 Officer
    troutman97 wrote: »
    I had a feeling the Hobie was going to come up. Maybe that's the way to go. I do think that hands free pedaling is going to be an absolute game changer. Obviously the only obstacle would be the funds situation but that could be overcome in time. One thing that I really do like about the smaller profile kayaks is the ability to launch in some hairy places (under bridges, roadside canals, etc). Maybe I'll just have to keep the trident for those applications. Thanks for the feedback guys I appreciate it.

    Craigslist is your friend. They are just pieces of plastic. They get scratched. They are not high tech, not a lot of moving parts. There are only a couple of years where there were significant changes so use that as a guide to what year to purchase. Have cash ready and move fast.
    Youtube - KEY WEST KAYAK FISHING https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkGY6yxE8kogYHKXisMhA2w
    All About The Bait Store - http://www.allaboutthebait.com/
  • mw32589mw32589 Posts: 23 Greenhorn
    Picked up a 2014 Hobie outback from a dealer with no scratches and looked brand new it was used in a swimming pool as a demo also came with new paddle, seat, and turbo fins for 1400 a couple months ago, found it on craigslist. It is my first kayak and I couldn't imagine fishing from a paddle kayak now, the peddle system is a game changer.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    ACTION CRAFT 1802
  • quatinquatin Posts: 598 Officer
    troutman97 wrote: »
    I had a feeling the Hobie was going to come up. Maybe that's the way to go. I do think that hands free pedaling is going to be an absolute game changer. Obviously the only obstacle would be the funds situation but that could be overcome in time. One thing that I really do like about the smaller profile kayaks is the ability to launch in some hairy places (under bridges, roadside canals, etc). Maybe I'll just have to keep the trident for those applications. Thanks for the feedback guys I appreciate it.

    It's not hands free pedaling, it's 1 handed pedaling with one hand on the rudder control. If you let go of the rudder control, you're going in circles. I personally didn't find much value in the "hands free marketing gimmick". In terms of effort over distance, it's roughly the same if you know how to paddle. You can kind of split paddling with pedaling, but Hobies are such terrible paddle kayaks that you're not going to want to paddle one unless you have to. There's a ton of hull slap, the drive drags you off plane and not having a rudder prevents you from doing full power strokes. Even if you remove the mirage drive, water will shoot up the drive well and drag you off plane, so you have to bring the block insert.

    The real benefit of Hobie is the Mirage drive can move a ton of stuff. It just defies logic that a 150lb ProAngler can chug along at 3 knots all day on a Mirage drive. Think of it like a pick up truck with a lot of torque. No other kayak can compete as a fishing platform to the PA, with all the available deck space. If you want a "do everything" kayak, get the PA. You can stand up to pole around on the flats and go offshore.

    If you want to stay in the paddle game, go fiberglass. The US kayak companies are fixated on putting a bunch of bells and whistles on otherwise poor paddling kayaks. The Trident 13 is actually one of the better models that you can get some distance on. Look at fiberglass Kaskazi & Stealth fishing kayaks from South Africa & New Zealand. A world of difference in terms of paddle performance.
  • troutman97troutman97 Posts: 81 Deckhand
    Definitely not looking to purchase new. My current kayak was bought through craigslist and I intend to get the next one that way.
  • JoeBCJoeBC Posts: 608 Officer
    troutman97 wrote: »

    1. Going to be used for both offshore and backcountry (speed is key)

    Maybe I'm alone here but I don't think this is a good way to go about buying a kayak, figure out which type of fishing you will be doing the most and buy the kayak that fits that the best. I bought my native slayer because I wanted to stand/pole and fly-fish and I have no doubt that I bought the best kayak for that, and while it can go offshore(i hear), and fish in some tight backwaters as well it fits its primary need the best. What species are you going to target the most and what tackle are you going to use to target them? Then get the kayak which allows you to do that the most comfortably.
  • troutman97troutman97 Posts: 81 Deckhand
    JoeBC I am not saying that the suggestion you made isn't ideal but unfortunately some people, myself being one, can't afford to purchase two kayaks to do both. Sure a 14 or 15 ft kayak isnt going to be ideal in tight water and a wide stable kayak isnt going to be ideal for paddling long distances but I don't have the luxury of taking two kayaks on every fishing trip. Hopefully some day I can be rid of the dilemma but as of today gotta make due. Quatin awesome info I appreciate the input. Never even thought of a fiberglass yak as an option ill look into it.
  • JoeBCJoeBC Posts: 608 Officer
    Not saying you gotta buy 2, just be honest with yourself about what you are gonna end up doing most and get the yak that is better for that, because pretty much all of them will get by in both scenarios.
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