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Jacksonville Beach "Renourishment"

I am not sure if you all have heard about it or not yet, but the city of Jax has set a beach "renourishment" to be done in early July. What they will do is get a bunch of sand from offshore and dump it onto the beaches. Sounds like a good idea to keep the dunes high and the beaches more "weatherproof". However in all reality this "renourishment" does bad to our ecosystem. It had been proven in studies that the dumping of sand onto our beaches can generate a bacteria. This bacteria is known to cause red tides, which I'm sure many of y'all have heard is going on in the mosquito lagoon currently. Thousands of fish and other types of wildlife are being killed by these tides occurring. This will effect their areas fishing for years to come. The last time the city of Jax did one of these renourishments here in Jax was just a few years ago and it effected our fishing, BAD! The year of the renourishment there were only 8 kings caught off of the pier, the year before there was over 100 caught! So, me and a group of buddies that fish the pier regularly have set up a petition, we have already been contacted by action news in regards to our petition! If each one of you could PLEASE take 5 minutes out of your day to sign our petition it would mean a lot! The well being of our wildlife and outstanding fisheries is up to us to protect! I will post the link In the comment below, every signature helps!!!

Replies

  • bluewatermafiabluewatermafia Posts: 540 Officer
    I'm no biologist, but I don't understand how moving sand would cause a red tide.
    Also, wouldn't the decline in king catches be attributed to the shallower water under the pier after the dredging?
  • Alec_904Alec_904 Posts: 59 Deckhand
    I'm no biologist, but I don't understand how moving sand would cause a red tide.
    Also, wouldn't the decline in king catches be attributed to the shallower water under the pier after the dredging?

    Click on the link and it is further explained about the type of bacteria, and it could have something to do with it, but what I've heard is that kings are sensitive when it comes to different changes in their environment like the possible increase of bacteria, much like they are sensitive to water temps...
  • willybigboywillybigboy Posts: 217 Deckhand
    didn't we have a good thermocline the same year they did the rennourishment
  • Sea-SquatchSea-Squatch Posts: 1,763 Captain
    We don't need any rennourishment here in NB. Our beach is doing fine. All of the "silt" they piled up last time was washed away by the first nor'easter. The stuff they pump up is very low quality sand. JB needs to plant a ton of sea-oats like NB & AB did 30+ yrs ago! I don't remember a red tide from the last pump job.



  • Cast_N_BlastCast_N_Blast JaxPosts: 1,429 Officer
    Remember when they dredged in 2003 or so and loaded our beaches with oyster shells? Got so many cuts while surfing/walking down the beach. I think they were bringing in filler from the river on that particular project.
  • LunaseaLunasea Posts: 136 Deckhand
    We don't need any rennourishment here in NB. Our beach is doing fine. All of the "silt" they piled up last time was washed away by the first nor'easter. The stuff they pump up is very low quality sand. JB needs to plant a ton of sea-oats like NB & AB did 30+ yrs ago! I don't remember a red tide from the last pump job.


    This is the real solution. Beachfront land owners don't like it b/c the sea oats (and ultimately the dunes they form) block their ocean views. They would rather have the rest of us pay HUGE $$$$ to pump sand on the beach every few years (that will ALWAYS be washed away by storms that WILL HAPPEN)... Total waste of taxpayer $$$$....
  • BadfishBadfish Posts: 1,104 Officer
    toxic algae blooms as a result of chemical fertilizers are the main cause of the fish kill south of us, not red tide. i agree with squatch about the sea oats
  • trousertroutmantrousertroutman Posts: 1,363 Officer
    beach replenishment kills sand fleas and periwinkles that a lot of surf species eat.
    guilty pleasure, those metal pipes made pretty sick little waves
    Make the forum great again.....consolidate general fishing with for sale or business but keep reports separate!
  • osprey11osprey11 Posts: 1,171 Officer
    They screw up the natural sanbars and surfbreaks.


  • coolcowcoolcow Posts: 15 Deckhand
    No beaches on the east coast of Florida are natural. All of them have been directly renourished or have benefited from renourishment of nearby beaches. True, the sand will wash away with future storms -- that is the point. The purpose of beach renourishment is to restore the the beach to something similar to its natural form. The beaches are great for tourism, sea turtles can lay eggs, we can fish, and they offer a buffer which protects the coast from flooding and other storm damage.

    The reason we have to do this is because we have inlets. Sand moves from north to south along the entire east coast of Florida. Something like 500,000 cubic yards of sand per year moves from Georgia to Florida. Some sand gets caught in the channels of each inlet that sand tries to pass. When the tide goes out, much of that sand is jetted offshore where the sand will not make it back to the beach. The two huge, deep inlets (St. Johns and St. Marys) catch and jet about a third of that sand and jet it offshore before that sand makes it to Jacksonville. By the time you get to Miami, you only get about 10,000 cubic yards of sand per year.

    There aren't many options -- seawalls (not good for tourism, sea turtles, fishing, surfing, etc), breakwaters offshore (not as bad, but it doesn't work on its own), letting the inlets fill in so sand can move naturally (the Navy and the state's economy that depends on inport/export would like to have a word; not a real option), and various other hard engineered solutions come to mind.

    The general consensus is that renourishment is the least invasive method to keep beaches around in Florida. It's not perfect, but the benefits (for man and nature) seem to far outweigh any adverse effects. Every single mile of east coast beach has benefited from renourishment. People will even argue to keep beaches "natural" that at one time had waves breaking on A1A at different times before pumping sand on the beaches became the norm.

    Most of this is fact with a little opinion mixed in. Anyway, I'm just some guy saying stuff on the internet.
  • Sea-SquatchSea-Squatch Posts: 1,763 Captain
    coolcow wrote: »
    No beaches on the east coast of Florida are natural. All of them have been directly renourished or have benefited from renourishment of nearby beaches. True, the sand will wash away with future storms -- that is the point. The purpose of beach renourishment is to restore the the beach to something similar to its natural form. The beaches are great for tourism, sea turtles can lay eggs, we can fish, and they offer a buffer which protects the coast from flooding and other storm damage.

    The reason we have to do this is because we have inlets. Sand moves from north to south along the entire east coast of Florida. Something like 500,000 cubic yards of sand per year moves from Georgia to Florida. Some sand gets caught in the channels of each inlet that sand tries to pass. When the tide goes out, much of that sand is jetted offshore where the sand will not make it back to the beach. The two huge, deep inlets (St. Johns and St. Marys) catch and jet about a third of that sand and jet it offshore before that sand makes it to Jacksonville. By the time you get to Miami, you only get about 10,000 cubic yards of sand per year.

    There aren't many options -- seawalls (not good for tourism, sea turtles, fishing, surfing, etc), breakwaters offshore (not as bad, but it doesn't work on its own), letting the inlets fill in so sand can move naturally (the Navy and the state's economy that depends on inport/export would like to have a word; not a real option), and various other hard engineered solutions come to mind.

    The general consensus is that renourishment is the least invasive method to keep beaches around in Florida. It's not perfect, but the benefits (for man and nature) seem to far outweigh any adverse effects. Every single mile of east coast beach has benefited from renourishment. People will even argue to keep beaches "natural" that at one time had waves breaking on A1A at different times before pumping sand on the beaches became the norm.

    Most of this is fact with a little opinion mixed in. Anyway, I'm just some guy saying stuff on the internet.

    Our beach rebuilds itself during the summer, and washes away every winter. That's the natural process of beach erosion/renourishment. Yes, the traditional longshore current is disrupted by the man made jetties of area inlets, but there is still sand moving. If JB would plant the heck out of seaoats, they would have the same results as NB & AB. Not a grain of sand needs to be pumped on JB, if they're not going to plant oats. It's a waste of time and money.



  • JohnathanJohnathan Posts: 14 Greenhorn
    Only took 3 minutes, I signed but if they have already set it to be done in July it is more than likely too late. Dealt with this while living in Daytona area, my thoughts, it didn't accomplish a thing! IMHO
  • po28derpo28der Posts: 277 Deckhand
    Yea make all the news you want. Nobody cares. I used to love fishing from down twin to the buckman. I don't catch much there now. I just go to Mayport. The dredging screwed everything up. Now I see stuff being down at the little jetties. I think they are screwing things up also. I think I need to move to low population area to find a place where we are not dredging and screwing shut up.
  • trousertroutmantrousertroutman Posts: 1,363 Officer
    po28der wrote: »
    I think I need to move to low population area to find a place where we are not dredging and screwing shut up.

    Best of luck on your quest
    Make the forum great again.....consolidate general fishing with for sale or business but keep reports separate!
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