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One man didn't cause it. But can one man do anything about it?

The demise of the lagoon/river systems breaks my heart.
I know we can all agree on some of the major causes for it, and I know there are meetings to attend, plans to be made, and taxpayer money to allocate.. but that's not my point here.

I want to know what I can do.

Not one single person caused this to happen, and it's going to take a lot to fix it, but there has to be something ONE person can do.

Keep our boats/kayaks out of the lagoon/river for a long while?
Are there samples we can individually pull to help out?
Cleaning efforts we can join up with?

I'm not looking to fix the whole thing. Can't. Just looking for something meaningful I can do.

Thanks for any thoughts/suggestions.

Replies

  • shamrock1188shamrock1188 Posts: 272 Deckhand
    There is a lot of things one man can do. A few of them are. If you have a pet pick up after there waste. Don't fertilize your yard. Don't use soap to wash your car or boat. If you want to go to the extreme sell your car and ride a bike. Sell your boat with a motor and buy a kayak. There is many more things one man can do but is everybody willing to make the lifestyle changes that are needed? The death:stinkfish of the lagoon was caused by many of one man.
  • MSW_SatelliteBeachMSW_SatelliteBeach Posts: 212 Officer
    Let's not go eco-crazy in recommendations here. An overreaction/overreach during a legitimate issue will cause more harm than doing nothing at all when it comes to perception. This isn't/shouldn't be 'eco-warriors' vs. 'evil-corporatists' - it should be rationally minded people recognizing a problem and doing what they can to fix it. Making it more than that will not do anyone any favors.

    I don't own pets outside my house, and have never understood the desire to fertilize a yard - it's God's job to keep that green, isn't it? ;) I also own a kayak and have for many years, and there is a bike in the garage. Not because I think there's anything wrong with boats or cars, just because I like fishing from a kayak. But bike riding is for folks much younger and in better shape than me.
    And the last time my truck was washed was at a local shop when I had a camper shell installed. I don't have time to wash it, nor am I concerned what people think of it, so other than an occasional rinse (for salt), even that's not an issue.

    There are specific causes for lagoon / river failures, and I don't think getting all automobiles off the road is going to affect any of them. I do believe maybe limiting boat traffic for a certain amount of time may help, but I honestly don't know that's a major contributor.

    </two cents>
  • bigoldredfishbigoldredfish Posts: 486 Deckhand
    Those are all ideas of what we can do. I'd like to believe that since we are all fishermen and women, and all enjoy the lagoon / river that we are already good stewards and know better than to take what we have for granted. I know a lot of folks here pick up trash while they are out in the river and on the spoil islands, don't dump anything in the river that doesn't belong, and do their best not to tear up what little seagrass is left.

    I make a game of it with my kids and we always come back with a bucket full of trash. The week before last I had them take gaff practice on a half a dozen mylar balloons we found floating out in the ocean that we brought home and disposed of.

    The discouraging part, at least down my way and further south is even with everyone doing their part it only takes one day to ruin months of effort. For example folks south of us were planting mangroves and oyster mats. A billion gallon blast of polluted lake water erased that effort. If the lake O water was clean it may not be as bad. But billions of gallons of water that has had fertilizer and nitrates and pollutants back pumped into it doesn't work. So it seems what we are doing, even though it is the right thing is a band aid on a axe wound.

    Diverting the water south sounds like a good plan, and goes back to what used to naturally occur in Florida. But if the water isn't cleaned up somehow first we are just diverting the problem. Possibly re-engineering the old **** so that they do not have the need to dump the water every time the level goes above 13 feet may also be an idea. Then you have to address all the other canals, like the C-54 here in Sebastian, muck, the road and storm runoff, septic, and then what we do as individuals will have a visible impact on keeping the river clean and maintained without all our efforts being wiped out by one big rain storm.
  • Edgewater220Edgewater220 Posts: 488 Officer
    There should be a change to the building codes where storm runoff should be filter prior to the runoff going into the water systems. People want to have nice homes and your not going to get these subdivisions to let their investments go to the dump. Why not make them responsible for what they put into the river and the costs associated with that. Seem like an easier way to handle the situation and something that could be implemented or retro fitted into every neighborhood. Just an idea that came to mind.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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  • duckmanJRduckmanJR Posts: 20,925 AG
    Let's not go eco-crazy in recommendations here. An overreaction/overreach during a legitimate issue will cause more harm than doing nothing at all when it comes to perception. This isn't/shouldn't be 'eco-warriors' vs. 'evil-corporatists' - it should be rationally minded people recognizing a problem and doing what they can to fix it. Making it more than that will not do anyone any favors.

    I don't own pets outside my house, and have never understood the desire to fertilize a yard - it's God's job to keep that green, isn't it? ;) I also own a kayak and have for many years, and there is a bike in the garage. Not because I think there's anything wrong with boats or cars, just because I like fishing from a kayak. But bike riding is for folks much younger and in better shape than me.
    And the last time my truck was washed was at a local shop when I had a camper shell installed. I don't have time to wash it, nor am I concerned what people think of it, so other than an occasional rinse (for salt), even that's not an issue.

    There are specific causes for lagoon / river failures, and I don't think getting all automobiles off the road is going to affect any of them. I do believe maybe limiting boat traffic for a certain amount of time may help, but I honestly don't know that's a major contributor.

    </two cents>

    I like you Bill... you have a good level head.

    I could type a page here... but I would say...Start small. There are several grass roots organizations that love their volunteers. Everything from Mangrove planting to clean up efforts to assisting with sampling.

    Maybe we need to "sticky" both the list of contacts (keep the heat on them)

    and a listing of Organizations with volunteer efforts...
    There are many roads to travel
    Many things to do.
    Knots to be unraveled
    'fore the darkness falls on you
  • The lazy pirateThe lazy pirate Posts: 33 Deckhand
    What happens if I sell my boat to a local and he/she takes it into the lagoon? I'm down a boat and they are still boating the lagoon. I agree, let's think logically here. We can all pick up our animals @&amp;$$! And stop fertilizing our lawns. I ride my bike as much as possible and use bio soap for my boat and truck. I'm sure it's not 100% Eco safe but I'm doing what I can.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  • MSW_SatelliteBeachMSW_SatelliteBeach Posts: 212 Officer
    duckmanJR wrote: »
    I like you Bill... you have a good level head.

    I could type a page here... but I would say...Start small. There are several grass roots organizations that love their volunteers. Everything from Mangrove planting to clean up efforts to assisting with sampling.

    Maybe we need to "sticky" both the list of contacts (keep the heat on them)

    and a listing of Organizations with volunteer efforts...

    Who's Bill? ;)
    I actually think that's a GREAT idea. Exactly what I was looking for.
  • Gary S. ColecchioGary S. Colecchio Posts: 24,922 AG

    I want to know what I can do.

    You can petition your local government to ban all residential fertilizers and residential landscape watering.

    You can also petition them to create and fund local storm water utilities districts to tax residential properties to create and maintain advanced stormater treatment from properties and roadway drainage.

    You can petition your local government to deny the approval of new septic tank construction and replacement for residential properties and require them to be replaced by a date certain by a municipal or county advanced wastewater treatment system, which all residences must connect to.

    And lastly you can demand that all the aging wastewater collection and treatment facilities be replaced , upgraded and have their capacity increased to avert overflows during extreme weather condition and fund that by rate adjustments and property assessments based upon their equivalent residential unit ECU estimates.

    This also includes modifying your local development order process to include upgrading the stormwater and water and wastewater transmission, collection and treatment facilities they will impact.

    You can do all those things right now with the stroke of a pen and a loud voice at your local city council or county commission meeting.

    In the mean time, buy a composting toilet.
    "If I can't win, I won't play." - Doris Colecchio.

    "Well Gary, the easiest way to look tall is to stand in a room full of short people." - Curtis Bostick

    "All these forums, with barely any activity, are like a neglected old cemetery that no one visits anymore."- anonymouse
  • duckmanJRduckmanJR Posts: 20,925 AG
    Who's Bill? ;)
    I actually think that's a GREAT idea. Exactly what I was looking for.

    Sorry...crossed wires in m y head... :grin
    There are many roads to travel
    Many things to do.
    Knots to be unraveled
    'fore the darkness falls on you
  • Topwater GuyTopwater Guy Posts: 473 Deckhand
    Kind of ironic, but in the mail today is TruGreen offering a $29.95 special to weed and feed the yard. It indicates that 153 homes in the area have this service.......Here is part of the problem!!
    Lead, Follow..... Just, Get Out of the Way
  • Reel TealReel Teal Posts: 3,962 Captain
    153 homeowners. Starting to see the problem yet? It sure ain't the manatees....

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
  • duckmanJRduckmanJR Posts: 20,925 AG
    Kind of ironic, but in the mail today is TruGreen offering a $29.95 special to weed and feed the yard. It indicates that 153 homes in the area have this service.......Here is part of the problem!!

    You know it's not mine...Right Michael? :rotflmao
    There are many roads to travel
    Many things to do.
    Knots to be unraveled
    'fore the darkness falls on you
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 13,243 AG
    Bahia is natural Florida grass. St Augustine is non-native, and drinks much more water/fertilizer. Bahia is also nearly indestructible, I had my entire front yard dug up to fix a septic tank issue in my old house, and 2 months later with no sodding/fert the bahia had grown back to the point you could not tell anything happened.

    We need to get rid of St Augustine/zoisa grass. If you really want your lawn to be pristine, go xeriscape and put synthetic turf down. Want less weeds? put on a glove and pull.
    Like is like a Helicopter.  I do not know how to operate a Helicopter  
  • Topwater GuyTopwater Guy Posts: 473 Deckhand
    I like my yard.....The weeds are all green:rotflmao
    Lead, Follow..... Just, Get Out of the Way
  • duckmanJRduckmanJR Posts: 20,925 AG
    Bahia is natural Florida grass. St Augustine is non-native, and drinks much more water/fertilizer. Bahia is also nearly indestructible, I had my entire front yard dug up to fix a septic tank issue in my old house, and 2 months later with no sodding/fert the bahia had grown back to the point you could not tell anything happened.

    We need to get rid of St Augustine/zoisa grass. If you really want your lawn to be pristine, go xeriscape and put synthetic turf down. Want less weeds? put on a glove and pull.

    I like the way you think...but sadly, it is not the norm...All the old people and the rich folks love the super green manicured lawns.

    A full ban would be optimal...but i don't know if the politicians would advance the cause.
    There are many roads to travel
    Many things to do.
    Knots to be unraveled
    'fore the darkness falls on you
  • MSW_SatelliteBeachMSW_SatelliteBeach Posts: 212 Officer
    I like my yard.....The weeds are all green:rotflmao

    You know what moved weeds look like?
    Grass.

    :)
  • Topwater GuyTopwater Guy Posts: 473 Deckhand
    Exactly...........
    Lead, Follow..... Just, Get Out of the Way
  • Chief OsceolaChief Osceola Posts: 64 Greenhorn
    You can petition your local government to ban all residential fertilizers and residential landscape watering.

    You can also petition them to create and fund local storm water utilities districts to tax residential properties to create and maintain advanced stormater treatment from properties and roadway drainage.

    You can petition your local government to deny the approval of new septic tank construction and replacement for residential properties and require them to be replaced by a date certain by a municipal or county advanced wastewater treatment system, which all residences must connect to.

    And lastly you can demand that all the aging wastewater collection and treatment facilities be replaced , upgraded and have their capacity increased to avert overflows during extreme weather condition and fund that by rate adjustments and property assessments based upon their equivalent residential unit ECU estimates.

    This also includes modifying your local development order process to include upgrading the stormwater and water and wastewater transmission, collection and treatment facilities they will impact.

    You can do all those things right now with the stroke of a pen and a loud voice at your local city council or county commission meeting.

    In the mean time, buy a composting toilet.

    This stuff is right up my alley Gary. People get too frustrated with the government. We just need to make them understand that there are multiple avenues citizens can take when government fails to take action, especially when it comes to land and water that belongs to all of us. All of us need to keep that in mind. That river belongs to all of us.
  • whole lot of lovewhole lot of love Posts: 50 Deckhand
    other lawn services too in our neighborhood. they spray that stuff on thick. does anyone have any idea what percentage washes off into the canals after a rainstorm?
  • Those are all ideas of what we can do. I'd like to believe that since we are all fishermen and women, and all enjoy the lagoon / river that we are already good stewards and know better than to take what we have for granted. I know a lot of folks here pick up trash while they are out in the river and on the spoil islands, don't dump anything in the river that doesn't belong, and do their best not to tear up what little seagrass is left.

    I make a game of it with my kids and we always come back with a bucket full of trash. The week before last I had them take gaff practice on a half a dozen mylar balloons we found floating out in the ocean that we brought home and disposed of.

    The discouraging part, at least down my way and further south is even with everyone doing their part it only takes one day to ruin months of effort. For example folks south of us were planting mangroves and oyster mats. A billion gallon blast of polluted lake water erased that effort. If the lake O water was clean it may not be as bad. But billions of gallons of water that has had fertilizer and nitrates and pollutants back pumped into it doesn't work. So it seems what we are doing, even though it is the right thing is a band aid on a axe wound.

    Diverting the water south sounds like a good plan, and goes back to what used to naturally occur in Florida. But if the water isn't cleaned up somehow first we are just diverting the problem. Possibly re-engineering the old **** so that they do not have the need to dump the water every time the level goes above 13 feet may also be an idea. Then you have to address all the other canals, like the C-54 here in Sebastian, muck, the road and storm runoff, septic, and then what we do as individuals will have a visible impact on keeping the river clean and maintained without all our efforts being wiped out by one big rain storm.

    Extremely small amount of water was backpumped this year, in fact less that 1/100 of 1 percent of the water released from the lake was backpumped. Most flows in the North end from the Kissimmee river basin. This is Disney waste, not Big Sugar!

    Want to do something,,?? Lobby for sewage systems and get rid of septic tanks!
  • shamrock1188shamrock1188 Posts: 272 Deckhand
    Where does it go after I flush my toilet and goes trough the sewage system and treatment plat? Don't they just pump it into the river?:huh
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 13,243 AG
    Where does it go after I flush my toilet and goes trough the sewage system and treatment plat? Don't they just pump it into the river?:huh

    Over here in the central part of the state I believe they use it to irrigate golf courses. I don't know what they do with it over there.
    Like is like a Helicopter.  I do not know how to operate a Helicopter  
  • bigoldredfishbigoldredfish Posts: 486 Deckhand
    Extremely small amount of water was backpumped this year, in fact less that 1/100 of 1 percent of the water released from the lake was backpumped. Most flows in the North end from the Kissimmee river basin. This is Disney waste, not Big Sugar!

    Want to do something,,?? Lobby for sewage systems and get rid of septic tanks!

    oh, guess I read it wrong then.

    http://www.mypalmbeachpost.com/news/weather/polluted-water-back-pumped-into-lake-o-as-record-r/nqGxL/

    http://www.tcpalm.com/news/indian-river-lagoon/health/lake-okeechobee-discharges-to-start--soon-2a657b77-b625-6872-e053-0100007f44b8-366869691.html
  • Gary S. ColecchioGary S. Colecchio Posts: 24,922 AG
    You did.

    The back pumping only lasted 4 days because the system was at capacity and there was a flood risk to the local communities. The water in the EAA (where the sugar farming is) moves south by gravity.

    It would need to be pumped uphill to reach the lake.

    That only happens very rarely in times of extreme weather. When that happens, the water is from the conveyance canals, not the farms.

    The water sent to tide via the C-43 and C-44 is not '"pollution" from "Big Sugar".

    And it has no effect on what is happening 70 miles to the north.

    That's a local watershed issue.
    "If I can't win, I won't play." - Doris Colecchio.

    "Well Gary, the easiest way to look tall is to stand in a room full of short people." - Curtis Bostick

    "All these forums, with barely any activity, are like a neglected old cemetery that no one visits anymore."- anonymouse
  • aflatsnutaflatsnut Posts: 89 Deckhand
    OK, this is a bit of a reach. Here's the problem. Our political system is broken. Politicians are elected to office by campaign contributions from large corporations and special interests. This in itself is a corruption of our country. Government officials are elected by the people, not corporations or special interests, they have no voter registration, or any say regarding who gets elected. Having said that, campaign contributions must come from the people whom are eligible to vote, and must be limited such that we do not have a lopsided money pool leaning towards the wealthy. There are over 235,000,000 people eligible to vote in the United States, a mandatory $5.00 contribution per eligible voter per year would bring over one billion dollars to run campaigns. Next, all political ads and debates be held on Public television,( doing so would fund Public TV). Now you have elected officials being elected without influence from corporations or special interests,or Television political affiliations, and less likelihood of being influenced by other than voters. The State of Florida has long been run by developers and large corporations which is why we can't seem to get attention to the water quality issues going on at present.
    WE HAVE TO HAVE A GOVERNMENT OF THE PEOPLE AND BY THE PEOPLE, CORPORATIONS ARE NOT PEOPLE

    It will never get fixed until we fix the government
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