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What are these little red fish?

model14model14 JacksonvillePosts: 1,035 Officer
This is a long, poor quality video I recorded it at MR a couple of weeks ago. It is from the cctv camera I use for guidance only. Please look at it and give me your best guess as to the many small, red fish with big black eyes, mixed in with the Grunts. I want to say little B-liners, but this is in just 58 feet of water depth and the water temp is 64 deg. Maybe a bunch of baby red snapper? Go to time 3:40.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWy_j5yuU74&feature=youtu.be

Thanks,
Richard

Replies

  • model14model14 JacksonvillePosts: 1,035 Officer
    Look at time 5:02, I believe that is a red snapper. What we may be seeing is hundreds of juveniles. I have never seen this before.
  • model14model14 JacksonvillePosts: 1,035 Officer
    Here is a little better quality. Look at 5:10 on. I sent this to the Red Snapper gurus in South Carolina. I hope it is of interest to them.
    https://vimeo.com/160399780
  • CountryBumpkinCountryBumpkin Fla. Piney WoodsPosts: 1,668 Captain
    Yes you are correct small vermilion, beeliners, grouper candy bars or whatever else you want to call them.:grin

    Anything over 50 feet deep and these would not surprise me at all..............now mind you they may not be there all year around, or in all water temps.
  • model14model14 JacksonvillePosts: 1,035 Officer
    I sent this video to Ms. Brouwer at SAFMC and here is her response back:

    Hi Richard,

    Thanks for sharing your video. It is nice to see a healthy school of juvenile red snapper. At that point in their life (between 1 and 2 years of age), red snapper aggregate in inshore artificial reefs and other structures that provide shelter from predators and abundant food. As they get older, they move to reefs further offshore. As you know, harvest of red snapper has been closed in offshore waters since 2010 and our hope is that the population is getting healthier and more abundant. There are indications that the year class that was born in 2014 is a strong one, which would be supported by the abundance of young fish in your video!

    The Council will be discussing red snapper management at their upcoming meeting in Cocoa Beach the second week of June. If you are in the area and are interested in learning about the management process, please stop by the meeting. All of our meetings are open to the public and they provide a good opportunity for members of the public to share information and voice their opinion about how fisheries should be managed.

    Thanks again for sending the video and please feel free to contact me or anyone else at the Council office with any questions or concerns. It is critically important that stakeholders remain involved!

    Best,

    Myra

    Myra Brouwer
    Fishery Scientist
    South Atlantic Fishery Management Council
    4055 Faber Place Drive; Suite 201

    It is really nice to see such a response, in just 4 days (including the weekend). Hopefully the management planning is really working and we will get our Red Snapper fishery back. Do your best to stay positive.
    I currently intend to go to the Cocoa Beach meeting.
  • CountryBumpkinCountryBumpkin Fla. Piney WoodsPosts: 1,668 Captain
    It don't surprise me that Myra can't tell a beeliner from a genuine red............their esteemed grouper guru couldn't tell a warsaw from a jewfish a few years ago either.

    It is nice to see you take a interest, don't get me wrong.

    But I do suggest you go to a couple meetings and pick up any literature they may have available and read the captions below any fish pictures that are in the pamphlets.

    It won't take you too long to figure out what part of the "real problems" are with our current state of fish managers and "scientific experts".:wink
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