What Would You Do In This Situation?

james 14james 14 Posts: 3,001 Moderator
A few days ago I was working down a dim road with about 30 min left just trying to get a last minute tom to fire off before 1pm. The roads runs into the main road (which is still closed to vehicles but it's WIDE) and as I got there I peak down the road to see a mature tom walking away in the middle of the road about 200 yards away. I hit a few cuts and he looks up but continues to walk away. I hit a yelp and he starts walking away faster.

I had no chance to loop around him at this point so I let him get out of sight and I walked the other way up the main road back to the truck. Turns out I was just a little too late crossing his path because I could see where he had been strutting in the middle of the road under and oak tree.

My question is what would you do if you came up to a main road and saw a bird walking away from you? I might could've crawled a hen decoy out...or a fan if I had one. I should've known better than to yelp. I would've been curious to see his reaction to a gobble but I didn't think of that until it was too late. My experience with birds doing this is that they don't want to come to a call and they're hoping to walk up on a hen instead.

Replies

  • micci_manmicci_man Somewhere in FLPosts: 13,490 AG
    I would have called to him. What else? Never know. I called in two gobblers yesterday at 4p. The one that got to 35 was a young bird. He got a pass. The one that was at 50 was the boss. They didn't see what they liked and turned the other way. Gobbling the entire way off. I shook my head. I actually tried to get in front of them with no success.
    Common Sense can't be bought, taught or gifted, yet it is one of the few things in life that is free, and most refuse to even attempt to possess it. - Miguel Cervantes
  • james 14james 14 Posts: 3,001 Moderator
    If he hadn't started moving away quicker I could've dropped my gear and sprinted through the woods to cut him off. I almost tried anyway but I would've needed to cover about a mile to get far enough due to where he was by that point. If it wasn't 12:45 I might've tried it. I've killed a few this way and they may have been the most fun...more than any I've ever called.
  • shempshemp Posts: 571 Officer
    If he hadn't started moving away quicker I could've dropped my gear and sprinted through the woods to cut him off. I almost tried anyway but I would've needed to cover about a mile to get far enough due to where he was by that point. If it wasn't 12:45 I might've tried it. I've killed a few this way and they may have been the most fun...more than any I've ever called

    You just got unlucky on the time...you summed exactly what I would've done, time permitting
  • hunterjwhunterjw Posts: 404 Deckhand
    Considering the time frame until 1pm I would have also called hoping for a shot in the dark that he was fired up, alone and looking. Plenty of times a bird will take a 180 and come to you..If this was public land I probably would have done a few clucks and purrs and that is it. Pressured birds on public land typically run from calls in my experience. If he continued on his way and did not come in I would set up there the next day an hour earlier :USA
    "He who hoots with the owls at night will not soar with the eagles at dawn"

  • awFSUducksawFSUducks Posts: 255 Officer
    I carry a gobble tube for that exact situation. A last ditch effort.
  • ShineShine Posts: 821 Officer
    james 14 wrote: »
    My question is what would you do if you came up to a main road and saw a bird walking away from you? .


    Not sure what to do, but I can tell you what I did. Had almost this exact situation. I moved thought the woods where he stepped in, but that did not produce results. Cutting an intercept through the brush for 200+ yards is harder then it looks. Played this over and over in my head for a couple of years now. By mid day, gobblers just seem to get less and less interested and the challenge goes way up in getting them to react to a call. Think about the fact that you don't hear hens much past first few hours of light.

    Probably no set strategy for something like this, but one technique I like for late day is to sit on the road and just let them walk by. Turkeys will walk roads looking for insects and its a good place to find them. No surprise you saw him where you did. If I had to do it all over, I would walk through the woods and cut the distance in half. Sit 20 yards off the road in good cover. If I called at all, it would be only purrs -- more common to mid day activity. I find after about 10:00 am, it gets real hard to get a bird to react to a call. But, it happens. Aggressive calling rarely works unless they are right in the heat peak breading and competition. If I see or hear hens being aggressive -- then I may consider aggressively calling. Late day, I often hunt turkeys like a deer -- look for places you know they go, sit and wait them out. Turkeys walk around all day and cover a lot o ground. And then, there is always tomorrow.

    http://wildturkeyzone.com/hunting/cluck%20n%20purr.wav
Sign In or Register to comment.