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The current state of our lagoons..

As everyone knows, the water quality inshore is really in the toilet.. I have never seen it this bad in February. Areas I was destroying the fish in this time last year are currently murky wastelands.. The grass has really taken a hit since 2010, and it looks like it's going to take another severe hit with this current bloom. The water quality has been bad for the last 6 months while we waited for winter to do it's thing and clean up the flats and then we get the confirmation that we do indeed have a bloom that is not going anywhere anytime soon.


So theoratically (and probably realistically) lets say the water does not clean up at all and stays murky into the summer months when it normally dirties back up again .. This means sunlight will have not adequately reached the grass in roughly 1.5 years... I cannot imagine what it will look like when it finally cleans up.. Areas that were thick with grass this time last year, I pole across now and don't feel a stitch of grass under my pushpole, all sand.. not that I can actually see the bottom in 18" of water to confirm.. If these conditions hold steady for another year, this place is gonna look like sebastian..


The question becomes what can we realistically and feasibly do about this problem? I honestly have no idea.. There are really no people in legislative power that really care enough to do something about our waters here. Drastic changes need to be made, and fast.. And a simple fertilizer ban at this point will accomplish exactly nothing, we are wayyyyy beyond that.. I question if it is too late.. CAN the damage done be reversed with the sheer amount of people who live in this area? What can we do about it? It sure seems like the brass won't give this any attention until it starts affecting tourism and hurting their bottom line..


The No Fill No Kill organization is trying to create an initiative here locally of people calling and writing to our local officials to at the very least at least try to create more buzz about this because as of right now, this is being completely ignored.. We need a solid plan though, something needs to happen ASAP .. If it keeps going at this rate there won't be any habitat left to save..





Current aerial and satellite imagery of the lagoon right now..


I sat down and really studied these areas on google earth and used the time hop feature to go back in time to see what the flats looked like several years ago.. It paints a pretty stark picture..


























Why isn't CCA Florida all over this?


Here are some contacts... Who knows, maybe if we are loud enough, they will listen....

Brevard County Commissioner's
District 1
Commissioner Robin Fisher
Ph: (321) 264-6750
[email protected]

District 2 (Chair)
Commissioner Jim Barfield
Ph: (321) 454-6601
[email protected]

District 3
Commissioner Trudie Infantini
Ph: (321) 952-6300
[email protected]

District 4 (Vice Chair) Commissioner Curt Smith
Ph: (321) 633-2044
[email protected]

District 5 Commissioner Andy Anderson
Ph: (321) 253-6611
[email protected]

Click this link to Brevard County's Wiki:
Under the Gov. tab you can get our state and federal representatives info too. We will roll that out over the next few days too.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brevard_County,_Florida

Link to the only published info on this massive bloom:
http://www.floridatoday.com/…/brown-tide-befouls-…/79813372/
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Replies

  • duckmanJRduckmanJR Posts: 21,042 AG
    My answer is simple Mark....I am looking into a move. I just turned 60...and have no time to waste waiting on Gov't boondogles (what they are best at) or for mother nature to heal herself. The "fix" for this would be so expensive at this point...no politico will touch it because it is kryptonite. We are talking TRILIONS of dollars...
    and...it is still going to have a back seat to all the save the Everglades work...and you see how Effed up and bogged down that is.
    There are many roads to travel
    Many things to do.
    Knots to be unraveled
    'fore the darkness falls on you
  • whole lot of lovewhole lot of love Posts: 50 Deckhand
    duckmanJR wrote: »
    My answer is simple Mark....I am looking into a move. I just turned 60...and have no time to waste waiting on Gov't boondogles (what they are best at) or for mother nature to heal herself. The "fix" for this would be so expensive at this point...no politico will touch it because it is kryptonite. We are talking TRILIONS of dollars...
    and...it is still going to have a back seat to all the save the Everglades work...and you see how Effed up and bogged down that is.

    thanxs for letting me be a member. this algae bloom has me really worried. you have got to see what i saw in cocoa bch yesterday. go to where 520 meets cocoa bch the old gatsbys and look west. omg i never seen anything like it. the water looks like pea soup with alittle brown mixed in. figured the lowering of the water temps would combat the bloom. not at all. its bad beyond description. got to get the old golf clubs out this spring.
  • Net 30Net 30 Posts: 1,033 Officer
    duckmanJR wrote: »
    My answer is simple Mark....I am looking into a move. I just turned 60...and have no time to waste waiting on

    Sadly, others feel the same way. I have 2 neighbors that recently sold their homes and are moving due to the unhealthy state of the the Lagoon. The 2 families lived here for over 30 years and have seen the steady decline of the waters and lack of gamefish. They agree that they are not willing to wait on a non-responsive government to wake up and address the issue...they too believe that we have reached a tipping point of no return.....sad.
  • duckmanJRduckmanJR Posts: 21,042 AG
    Net 30 wrote: »
    Sadly, others feel the same way. I have 2 neighbors that recently sold there homes and are moving due to the unhealthy state of the the Lagoon. The 2 families lived here for over 30 years and have seen the steady decline of the waters and lack of gamefish. They agree that they are not willing to wait on a non-responsive government to wake up and address the issue...they too believe that we have reached a tipping point of no return.....sad.

    George, I guess I can say " Thankfully...I am but a poor retired public servant....so my humble abode will sell easily " :wink
    I will keep the smaller of my two homes for the time being..... I have been here since 1979....never thought this day would come.
    There are many roads to travel
    Many things to do.
    Knots to be unraveled
    'fore the darkness falls on you
  • zamogzamog Posts: 302 Deckhand
    Simple fix...cut thru at the **** and flush the chit, let the water flow

    And no, I don't mean your female's ****
  • duckmanJRduckmanJR Posts: 21,042 AG
    zamog wrote: »
    Simple fix...cut thru at the **** and flush the chit, let the water flow

    And no, I don't mean your female's ****

    Sorry....and don't take this the wrong way...BUT...

    That is an uninformed...and incorrect assumption that it would do anything meaningful. An analogy I have used is that it is like having a **** in your punch bowl....and your solution involves ADDING MORE PUNCH to dilute it. :grin

    Much like I explained to some other pilgrim, our IR Lagoon is an ESTUARY a "mixing bowl" if you will...of fresh water from the mainland...and seawater from seaward. The issue is that the water (fresh) from the mainland is coming in POLLUTED.... which is the core issue.
    There are many roads to travel
    Many things to do.
    Knots to be unraveled
    'fore the darkness falls on you
  • duckmanJRduckmanJR Posts: 21,042 AG
    zamog wrote: »
    Simple fix...

    There are NO "simple fixes".... just simple incorrect answers.
    There are many roads to travel
    Many things to do.
    Knots to be unraveled
    'fore the darkness falls on you
  • zamogzamog Posts: 302 Deckhand
    borf has gotten to your brain....we need a new cut to the ocean, make it tidal....simple fix
  • duckmanJRduckmanJR Posts: 21,042 AG
    zamog wrote: »
    borf has gotten to your brain....we need a new cut to the ocean, make it tidal....simple fix

    No, I have not seen Jason around in a long time....

    Regardless, your thinking...is flawed...at best.
    There are many roads to travel
    Many things to do.
    Knots to be unraveled
    'fore the darkness falls on you
  • zamogzamog Posts: 302 Deckhand
    duckmanJR wrote: »
    No, I have not seen Jason around in a long time....

    Regardless, your thinking...is flawed...at best.

    always flawed :D

    guess jason is still kickin?

    still need new inlet btw
  • duckmanJRduckmanJR Posts: 21,042 AG
    zamog wrote: »
    always flawed :D

    guess jason is still kickin?

    still need new inlet btw

    Might do a drive by...see if he is still around.
    There are many roads to travel
    Many things to do.
    Knots to be unraveled
    'fore the darkness falls on you
  • SpinfisherSpinfisher Posts: 756 Officer
    Just got back from the Lagoon, my eight trip there since November 2015. My family and I have fished the Banana, IRL and Mosquito Lagoon since 1995, still learning but I do fish the Mosquito Lagoon heavily during Fall/Winter, and based on memory and my familiarity with these waters I have to say that quality has declined. The quality of the water is just not the same and the catch seems to be be diminishing. I have pictures from several (3-4) years ago with Gin-Clear Waters. Just don't see that type of water or catch as much fish as before.

    We still catch our targeted species, are able to sight fish for some of them, but not as we were able to do in prior years..

    Hopefully it is just my bad luck and it is us that can't catch or find hungry fish, but it seems different for sure to me.

    Just my two cents!

    Spinfisher
  • GoonfanaticGoonfanatic Posts: 109 Deckhand
    Sadly, I have to agree with Duckman. It is way too costly of a fix for any one politician to touch. It also would involve the cooperation of multiple counties and their appointed leaders. Plus, even if something to help fix it was put on a ballot, (Buy land for the Everglades) those elected officials would just end up spending that money on something else. I know Tampa bay is not the Indian River, but Tampa Bay was turned around. Also,The fact that my hometown (Orlando) has turned into a crime -riddled toiletbowl, has led to my decision to move to the Gulf.
  • mmikitammikita Posts: 41 Deckhand
    I am sad about what is happening but glad I am not the only one sad about it. I attended the Harbor Branch Love your Lagoon dinner and fundraiser a week ago and had a chance to talk to some of the scientists there. Talk worked its way around to "tipping point" Freeze and multiple blooms are indeed threatening the rhizomes. No re-growth after that. Seagrass is not lawn grass. Does not do well under even moderate adversity. This all got pushed back too far. We are in big trouble here.
  • beachside321beachside321 Posts: 371 Deckhand
    I'm glad someone mentioned Tampa Bay. When I attended USF I did an internship with Hillsborough County Stormwater and Environmental Programs. Tampa Bay 30-40 years ago was in a worse state than the IRL. Through proper management, the seagrass there continues to recover at a great rate. Nowadays the county mostly focuses on proper fertilization and minimizing trash that enters the Stormwater, which empties into the bay.

    The main difference however is that the pollution in Tampa Bay was coming from mostly point source polluters. Industrial and agricultural activity could be directly linked to contaminants found in the water. It's much easier to go after one polluter rather than millions, which is what we face here. The over saturation of nutrients promotes the algae growth, which in turn chokes out the sunlight for the seagrass, which kills the grass, introducing even more nutrients... And the cycle continues.
  • gatorhookgatorhook Posts: 657 Officer
    Tampa Bay is doomed the fate of another gulf oil spill though. Hopefully rigs never get ok'ed along our coast. Our estuary is doomed, but at least you can go offshore or fish the beach still. These rivers have been ignored and will continue to as long as money continues to control the power. Land is dissappearing to more development, and wealthy land owners are not only polluting with runnoff but also cutting protected mangrove banks. The law doesn't go after offenders with big $ lawyers anymore.
  • Lunch Money SurfLunch Money Surf Posts: 1,033 Officer
    There has been more $$ committed - and more attention - to the river in the past few years than I have seen in my lifetime. And we've been *****ing about the state of the river since the 80's.

    Still a long way to go but at least something is happening at this point.

    And oh yeah I want a new inlet and I don't care if it helps or not :)
  • duckmanJRduckmanJR Posts: 21,042 AG
    There has been more $$ committed - and more attention - to the river in the past few years than I have seen in my lifetime. And we've been *****ing about the state of the river since the 80's.

    Still a long way to go but at least something is happening at this point.

    And oh yeah I want a new inlet and I don't care if it helps or not :)

    You just want to save the drive south Tom....:grin
    There are many roads to travel
    Many things to do.
    Knots to be unraveled
    'fore the darkness falls on you
  • FowlMouth824FowlMouth824 Posts: 367 Deckhand
    Since October of last year, I have not ventured into the lagoon to see all this for myself. The ducks, however low in numbers kept my attention for the past few months. This past weekend I finally pulled the skiff out and made my way to the north end of the IRL. Its not good out there at all. Not that this comes as a suprise to anyone. The water is a bad as everyone else is describing. Even right against the shoreline, in <4" of water. the bottom was hardly visible. I spent 6 hrs on the water that morning, and I saw no notable sign of any gamefish activity. Bait was scarce at best, and the only thing still swimming in any real numbers were the porpoises, and the ducks. The fact that the dolphins were still in the area has me puzzled, considering the scarcity of the bait, or anything really edible for that matter. The only glimmer of hope that I came across is that there is still some grass clinging to life along the western shore. But i fear it wont be long before that too has succumbed to this mess.

    Joe, you paint a grim picture of what we are facing here. I cut my teeth fishing these waters with my father, and it truly hurts me to consider the possibility that my daughter wont be able to experience the places that I grew up sharing with my dad. The fact that you are leaving really tells me that we are in for the long haul with this. Do you think there is any truly feasible approach that could have a positive impact at this point? Is it really "to far gone" to save?
  • gettinwetgettinwet Posts: 1,366 Officer
    I think a good start would be to replace every berm bridge on the intercoastal with an elevated one, maintain/restore/create a 100 yard wetlands barrier between any natural body of water and development, and restore/seed historic oyster/sea grass areas. There would also have to be some control/ban on fertilizer run off.

    Duckman's right - it will never happen - too much high dollar development at stake. Good bye Mosquito Lagoon, hello East River.
    There are only so many casts in life, so shut up and fish!!
  • gettinwetgettinwet Posts: 1,366 Officer
    One ray of hope though - I recall after that bad freeze a few years back most of the shallower grass beds were killed off - took a couple of years but most returned.
    There are only so many casts in life, so shut up and fish!!
  • duckmanJRduckmanJR Posts: 21,042 AG
    Joe, you paint a grim picture of what we are facing here. I cut my teeth fishing these waters with my father, and it truly hurts me to consider the possibility that my daughter wont be able to experience the places that I grew up sharing with my dad. The fact that you are leaving really tells me that we are in for the long haul with this. Do you think there is any truly feasible approach that could have a positive impact at this point? Is it really "to far gone" to save?

    Yes, Grim indeed.

    Let me say that I am an old man...I turned 60 this past Friday so my thought is that I just do not have the "time to wait". You are a young man with a young child so...time is on your side. Mother nature will heal herself...given some time...if we let her.

    The issue we face is will we do what is needed to allow only clean water to enter the estuary.
    I feel that getting a sewer system lagoon wide is imperative....and it must encompass both barrier islands and mainland side for a minimum of 5 miles or more inland. The system should be a cooperative of state and fed money with an assesment attached to every property. You can elect to pay it...or the property is liened and when it gets sold.... the lien is paid back to the Gov't.
    Also, every canal that shuttles ag water to the lagoon must have a system of "treatment wetlands" put in place. They just completed one of these in my area treating water that used to flow down the Sottile canal eventually to the lagoon. We will need more of these. Everywhere along the river where runoff water enters the system needs "baffle box" type systems.

    And .....awareness and true concern....from the great masses of people who live along it.
    There are many roads to travel
    Many things to do.
    Knots to be unraveled
    'fore the darkness falls on you
  • SpaceCoast SlayerSpaceCoast Slayer Posts: 3,527 Captain
    gettinwet wrote: »
    One ray of hope though - I recall after that bad freeze a few years back most of the shallower grass beds were killed off - took a couple of years but most returned.

    That grass came back because the rhizomes were still viable ... In the current situation the grass has been under occulation (blocked from the sun's light) for about 6 months.. and for all intents and purposes, will probably stay that way through summer into next winter... at which point after 1.5 years of occulation, the rhizomes (underground runner roots) will be dead and gone.. and at that point, the grass does not come back.. this is what we are facing..
  • whole lot of lovewhole lot of love Posts: 50 Deckhand
    saw a mullet jump just before dark. first mullet ive seen jumping in quite a while waters still grey green
  • Lunch Money SurfLunch Money Surf Posts: 1,033 Officer
    duckmanJR wrote: »
    You just want to save the drive south Tom....:grin

    That's a fact JR! I burn too much gas driving down to the inlet... at least starting in about a month...
  • Lunch Money SurfLunch Money Surf Posts: 1,033 Officer
    gettinwet wrote: »
    I think a good start would be to replace every berm bridge on the intercoastal with an elevated one, maintain/restore/create a 100 yard wetlands barrier between any natural body of water and development, and restore/seed historic oyster/sea grass areas. There would also have to be some control/ban on fertilizer run off.

    Duckman's right - it will never happen - too much high dollar development at stake. Good bye Mosquito Lagoon, hello East River.


    This is a huge factor, and not often discussed. The conversation usually focuses on runoff, but the causeways have really jacked up the natural flow of the river.
  • mmikitammikita Posts: 41 Deckhand
    It all happened pretty quickly but the conditions necessary and sufficient for the demise were being set in place for years. One catalyst probably would not have done it, but a series of catalysts (freeze, subsequent blooms, huge water build and additional blooms) all in fairly close proximity left us looking at what we are facing now. You can engineer and re-design nature, but re-designing the re-design is another matter all together. I am losing sleep over this.
  • gettinwetgettinwet Posts: 1,366 Officer
    mmikita wrote: »
    It all happened pretty quickly but the conditions necessary and sufficient for the demise were being set in place for years. One catalyst probably would not have done it, but a series of catalysts (freeze, subsequent blooms, huge water build and additional blooms) all in fairly close proximity left us looking at what we are facing now. You can engineer and re-design nature, but re-designing the re-design is another matter all together. I am losing sleep over this.

    Don't forget before this last huge water build there was a prolonged dry spell - big fish kill in any of the MIWR backwaters that got cut off from water flow.
    There are only so many casts in life, so shut up and fish!!
  • Riptide31Riptide31 Posts: 478 Deckhand
    Too many people in this county. Open the port locks and leave them open. At least that's doing something in the right direction.
  • duckmanJRduckmanJR Posts: 21,042 AG
    mmikita wrote: »
    It all happened pretty quickly but the conditions necessary and sufficient for the demise were being set in place for years. One catalyst probably would not have done it, but a series of catalysts (freeze, subsequent blooms, huge water build and additional blooms) all in fairly close proximity left us looking at what we are facing now. You can engineer and re-design nature, but re-designing the re-design is another matter all together. I am losing sleep over this.

    Correct, It is my contention that the "bomb" was being built a long time...but it took a "Perfect storm" of conditions to come together to trigger the bomb.
    There are many roads to travel
    Many things to do.
    Knots to be unraveled
    'fore the darkness falls on you
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