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Good Question - I think - "Front" this time of year- inshore

Alright, so say in Sarasota Bay with water temps in the lower 80's right now. We have a "front" moving through. So instead of it being upper 80's and low's at night in the mid 70s, its supposed to be lower 80s, with lows in the upper 60s lower 70s. It been somewhat stable for several weeks now. Now we are hit with a front, does this affect the flats fishing? If you tomorrow u had planned to go (Tuesday), would you look in the same places you looked just before the front, you fished last week, 2 weeks ago... Or totally change the pattern? Go deep, docks etc etc? In your own words, what do you think this does to the fishing.. For example: "Nothing" - "Fish will shut down"

Thanks in advance.

Replies

  • duckmanJRduckmanJR Posts: 21,055 AG
    The Fronts this time of year are mild and short duration...not enough to change things.

    I would fish where I caught fish 2 weeks ago...since you have the same tide situation every 14 days.
    There are many roads to travel
    Many things to do.
    Knots to be unraveled
    'fore the darkness falls on you
  • former bluefishinnyformer bluefishinny Posts: 1,492 Officer
    exact answer I was looking for! Thanks
  • former bluefishinnyformer bluefishinny Posts: 1,492 Officer
    Interesting read
  • CameronCameron Posts: 208 Deckhand
    Lake fishing revolves around a barometer where I am from, but inshore/nearshore fishing in south Florida doesn't seem to be as volatile when it comes to fronts at least as far as I have noticed. Even the fishing hot spots don't really change. Tides and long term water temps along with the moon brightness around here seem to be far more important.
  • former bluefishinnyformer bluefishinny Posts: 1,492 Officer
    Cameron... Interesting. Even say during middle of winter, after a front pushes out, and we get a few warm days, the next cold front does not seem to "shut em down" for ya?
  • CameronCameron Posts: 208 Deckhand
    Cameron... Interesting. Even say during middle of winter, after a front pushes out, and we get a few warm days, the next cold front does not seem to "shut em down" for ya?
    Only if the water temp itself goes a few degrees colder in the winter have we noticed a big drop off in bite. This often happens without storm fronts in the winter as many of the fish particularly snook do not like it cold. Even on cold days finding a sunny spot with a deep cut can yield a nice bite. Ultimately, I think it is tied to water temp not barometer.

    In the spring, summer and fall the water temps remain warm so fronts have little effect compared to other factors. This is just my one observation though.

    It is an odd parallel from the lakes of TN. In TN the bite could be completely dead mid-spring, storm starts to roll in and the bite goes crazy for a few days until the storm rolls out then dead again. Best fishing I have ever had there were on rainy days where we had to run the boat occasionally to drain water. Here, a storm could be moving in and often the fish hardly seem to notice.
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