OFFSHORE questions & answer section for depths 30 feet and out. FAQ's

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Replies

  • RapscallionRapscallion Posts: 63 Deckhand
    Is there anywhere on the internet (or do you have this information) that shows a chart for line deployed vs. running depth of different lures?

    Example: 150 feet of 50lbs braid gets a stretch 30 to about 35-40 feet between 4 and 5 mph.

    What I'd like to know is what happens at 200, even 400 feet of 50 pound braid deployed. I've played around with this at 60-70 feet of water, but don't want to lose my plugs on a rockpile because of trial and error if the information is available.

    Be good to what happens at different speeds, and different plugs: Rap Magnum 30, CD 22, CD 18, Yo-Zuri, etc.

    Do you use Z-Wings at all? Are you familiar with line deployed vs. running depth, and how to couple that with a diving plug to get them deeper? Right now I run 100 pound mono to the middle hole, and rig my releases off a 1 foot octopus 4 feet from the Zwing. If deploy my zwing 30 feet, I think it goes down to about 20, but I don't know this for sure....
  • capt louiecapt louie citrus countyPosts: 9,409 Moderator
    There is info available from testing on bass plugs and depth achieved but haven't seen any on saltwater plugs. It only matters when getting near the bottom. Blue water trolling I wouldn't think will make a difference.

    Trying to get a lure down in 100' to a grouper or snapper isn't worth it IMO. There are better choices.

    50' and less (sometimes deeper if the fish are aggressive and with good vis ) is where trolling for bottom fish works best. Simple method I use is using a magic marker. I tap bottom with a plug at a known depth I mark the line. Now the next time I put it back out I know where it's running.

    There is a maximum depth they will run (depending on several factors like line diameter and speed) and letting more line out will not help.

    Using trolling weights , planers and down riggers adds depth but just gets too involved for the small take we are allowed.
    "You'll get your weather"
  • Top ContenderTop Contender Posts: 590 Officer
    Capt Louie is spot on. I found a chart years ago that had some line distances and speed references for yozuri hydro magnums which is what I liked to troll the few times I did it. The best way is to hit bottom bring it in a little and mark it off for that depth. I successfully trolled up to 70' for grouper with those plugs using electric reels due to the amount of line that was needed. The fish will definitely come up to hit a trolled plug, if you'll watch your sounder you can often times see the fish rising to hit the plug and know the bites coming.
  • RapscallionRapscallion Posts: 63 Deckhand
    Where in the Gulf of Mexico is it possible to catch red snapper within 9 nm?
  • Top ContenderTop Contender Posts: 590 Officer
    From Cape San Blas west to Pensacola it's pretty easy to catch a limit in state waters. They even have a fair amount inside of Pensacola bay. A few can be found east of Cape San Blas but not very Far East and there are limited spots.
  • RapscallionRapscallion Posts: 63 Deckhand
    That's a haul, trailer wise. Interesting though. Sounds like the panhandle has it made....
  • Morning: Just wondering, any suggestions on a lower cost satellite phone to use off of Homosassa. Just want to cover some bases while out at the 40' mark in case of breakdowns etc. I do have a PLB and DSC. I thought I saw something on the forum about this but can not locate it. Thanks.
  • Top ContenderTop Contender Posts: 590 Officer
    I have a global star and pay around $300 a year for 120 minutes. I've never come close to using all of the minutes and I make a call everyother trip or so. I bought my phone off eBay for $140 it was an older model as they had just come out with new ones at the time. Still a brand new phone with charger. I bought a pelican case and have had it for 3 years with no issues. The only time it wouldn't call out was July 4th this year around 11pm, we were 105 miles off and I got a circuits are busy message. The next morning it worked as normal.
  • Top Contender; I contacted Global Star they have a free phone however you have to sign up for the 1200 minutes at a cost of $780 and if you just go with the regular plans, their phones range from 499. I'll have to check eBay and Amazon didn't think to check them out for deals. Thanks
  • Top ContenderTop Contender Posts: 590 Officer
    Yeah those plans were more than the average person needs, unless you make your living on the water. Having that phone will add to your peace of mind though.
  • true and yes: one time while out there, the CG was asking someone who had a bilge problem if they had a sat phone, got me thinking.
  • mburke001 aka TripleBmburke001 aka TripleB Posts: 1,084 Officer
    Mornin Contender: I looked at Goldstar and decided to go with the Ireach SE (its smaller than the satellite phones) only a monthly cost of $12 on the security plan w/10 texts per month but I can send more at an additional cost of .50/text. There's an SOS button where I can text and advise the problem and preset texting that supposedly doesn't have any additional cost. As we stated earlier just a peace of mind while offshore. Thanks for the insight
  • Top ContenderTop Contender Posts: 590 Officer
    You're welcome, it'll add some peace of mind while you're out. Now days there's safety devices to fit anybody's budget.
  • mburke001 aka TripleBmburke001 aka TripleB Posts: 1,084 Officer
    True, to go offshore without having some type of communication doesn't make sense.
  • SeaJaySeaJay Posts: 40 Greenhorn
    Is it true that when tying hooks to a leader, if snelled, the line should enter the hook on the barb side of the eye?

    I was told this affects hook up ratio, especially for circle hooks. Most knots don't seem to need a certain direction when threaded through the eye, but a cohort told me it matters for snelling, such as on red snapper/chicken rigs. What's your opinion on this?
  • Doc StressorDoc Stressor Homosassa, FLPosts: 2,250 Captain
    I read a paper where they compared the hookup ration with long line halibut using circle hooks snelled from the outside in and the inside out. Putting the line through the eye from the barb (in side) out greatly improved the hookup frequency.

    Here is a video that shows the way that I do it and why:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ExppbseEu0g

    I don't agree with his statement that using a crimped loop decreases hookups. I've had good luck with a loop knot, which lets me switch back and forth between dead and live baits. But snelling from the outside in toward the bend and barb will definitely cut down on your hookups.
  • capt louiecapt louie citrus countyPosts: 9,409 Moderator
    SeaJay wrote: »
    Is it true that when tying hooks to a leader, if snelled, the line should enter the hook on the barb side of the eye?

    I was told this affects hook up ratio, especially for circle hooks. Most knots don't seem to need a certain direction when threaded through the eye, but a cohort told me it matters for snelling, such as on red snapper/chicken rigs. What's your opinion on this?

    Barb side . Longliners been doing it that way and swear by it. It cams the hook gap into the jaw. Try it on your hand or a cup and you'll see how it works. I use a uni to snell.
    "You'll get your weather"
  • SeaJaySeaJay Posts: 40 Greenhorn
    That's what I thought... Thanks. That video is helpful... And that sure is an easy way to Snell.
  • wiperwiper Posts: 21 Greenhorn
    Headed about 28 miles off Homosassa last week to high relief structure in 62 feet of water. Great marks of AJ's mid column. Caught them all day long on speed jigs, live pins, shrimp and some bottom jigs (which made it to the bottom where the AJ's scarfed it up). Same area saw heavy concentration of black bass throughout a 1/4 mile drift area. The bite was strong as long as we had current (our drift speed as measured on the gps was 1.6mph) water temp was 63 F. First trip in as long as I can remember that we only caught what was in season - not a single grouper or snapper which was fine with me, I hate throwing them back.
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  • kingkong954kingkong954 Posts: 625 Officer
    So I assume that means you found keepers? > 34"?
  • Hanapa'aHanapa'a Posts: 17 Greenhorn
    Ok,Moving to the area. I have a 20ft deepvee Mako with 150 Merc. Everyone says wrong boat for the flats, So let's talk off shore. In hawaii there were days you could go out more than 10 miles out, But not often. In Hawaii 10 miles puts you in the channel and in 1500 ft of water.
    So I would like some input on how far and how safe. I have a 70 gal tank and great electronics and radios. I understand that it takes a good run to get out in deeper water. Yes?
  • Rick1-2Rick1-2 HorseshoePosts: 869 Officer
    If you know how to read the weather, know what you're boat can handle, have all the safety equipment and seatow, you'll have no prob, i used too on a 17 ft, go out sometimes 30 miles
  • M4RealM4Real Posts: 122 Deckhand
    Question about going offshore safely. I've got a 18' Key West Sportsman CC /w a 115 ETEC. I have hand-held 5W VHF radio. Well-equipped ditch bag and all the proper safety gear. I also have a ACR ResQLink+ in case the worst happens.

    My question is: How far out would generally be considered safe assuming good weather? I want to go out to fish haven off Crystal River. That's like 14 miles. Do I need a more powerful VHF? Bigger boat? I know those are definitely desired, but, are they absolutely necessary?

    I guess a more specific question would be: What do I need to safely run out 15 miles?

    I have many hours running close to shore, but, I'm wanting to fish and spearfish out in deeper water.
  • Rick1-2Rick1-2 HorseshoePosts: 869 Officer
    the boats fine but a fixed mount marine radio would be better
  • M4RealM4Real Posts: 122 Deckhand
    Rick1-2 wrote: »
    the boats fine but a fixed mount marine radio would be better

    I'm assuming because it would have more range? Any recommendations for an inexpensive option? I'm guessing it would require a fixed mounted antenna also.
  • Doc StressorDoc Stressor Homosassa, FLPosts: 2,250 Captain
    Here's the coverage are for the Coast Guard's Rescue 21 system:



    It's supposed to pick up a 1 watt transmission from a hand held radio if you hold it 6 ft in the air. Your radio needs to have DSC emergency capability. If it has a GPS or is connected to a GPS, it will also automatically transmit your location.

    The antenna at the Anclote power plant will pick up your distress signal, but it is unlikely that you will be able to talk to the Coast Guard with a hand held radio. A 25W VHF with an 8' fixed antenna is a much better choice. This will let you reach other boats within a 9-10 mile radius that may be able to render assistance in an emergency much faster than the CG. A hand held can only reach out about 3 miles to other boats with fixed antennas.

    Fixed mount VHFs are not expensive and are easy to install by yourself.

    The Standard Horizon GX1700 would be a good choice:

    http://www.standardhorizon.com/indexVS.cfm?
    cmd=DisplayProducts&ProdCatID=83&encProdID=8E6B84CBCC75E5A9C52CA71AA33BA6F5&DivisionID=3&isArchived=0


    You can get them for around $200. Get the best antenna that you can afford.
  • Rick1-2Rick1-2 HorseshoePosts: 869 Officer
    great advice doc, standard horizon are great
    also mount the antenna on the highest point, on my 17 ft i had no railings going around the center console glass so i made a stand out of pvc then mounted the antenna ontop of that
  • Doc StressorDoc Stressor Homosassa, FLPosts: 2,250 Captain
    A lot of guys with smaller boats or bayboats that don't have T-tops have problems with 8' antennas. They either don't have the gunwale space for them to lay down properly or else they don't like an antenna getting in the way of casting. Shakespeare has come out with a solution with their quick connect antennas. Rather than having the antenna wire with the connector going to the antenna itself, it goes to the antenna mount. This lets you keep the antenna in a storage area or rod rack until you need it. You would only need to screw the antenna into place for offshore trips and use your hand held when fishing inshore.

    http://www.defender.com/product.jsp?path=-1%7C344%7C2028693%7C2029060&id=3124416

    http://www.defender.com/product3.jsp?path=-1|344|2028695|2029066&id=3124439
  • Jim311Jim311 Posts: 4,843 Captain
    Hanapa'a wrote: »
    Ok,Moving to the area. I have a 20ft deepvee Mako with 150 Merc. Everyone says wrong boat for the flats, So let's talk off shore. In hawaii there were days you could go out more than 10 miles out, But not often. In Hawaii 10 miles puts you in the channel and in 1500 ft of water.
    So I would like some input on how far and how safe. I have a 70 gal tank and great electronics and radios. I understand that it takes a good run to get out in deeper water. Yes?


    We've run a Mako 20 inshore on the right days. It actually has a shallower draft than I would have thought. Obviously you have to time the tides right but it can be a pretty versatile boat for inshore and light offshore. We've hit 45-50 feet in a friend of mine's boat. Fun to be able to fill the box with cobia, reds, and trout in the same day.
  • Salty Dawg44Salty Dawg44 Homosassa, FLPosts: 841 Officer
    Definitely go with a fixed mount VHF radio. 25watts of transmit power vs 5 on a handheld. Plus the benefit of a much taller antenna. VHF radio waves are more or less "line of sight" from the transmitting to the recieving antennas. So just a few extra feet can make a pretty substantial difference in range. I personally find that an 8' antenna mounted on the gunwale seems to always in the way. So I found a 3' long grab rail on ebay and mounted it vertically on the side of my console and then mounted my antenna to that with a standard rail mount. It is snug, but not dogged down tightly. If necessary, I can slide the mount up the rail and gain an additional 3' of antenna height.





    It is on a 17' Sea Hunt, and I have no problem from 20 miles out getting a response from Sea Tow on their automated radio check.

    MY WORST FEAR......THAT WHEN I DIE MY WIFE WILL SELL ALL MY BOATS & FISHING GEAR FOR WHAT I TOLD HER I PAID FOR IT.......

    I may not always agree with what you say,
    but I will always respect your right to be wrong!
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