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Understanding Reels

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  • Reel TealReel Teal Posts: 3,962 Captain
    Did not "put the rod on the railing" it was "forced" by the combo of big strong fish & the limits of my own strength. And no "havent snapped a rod" b/c the fulcrum of the lever was on handle close to reel seat.



    Won 2 Party Boat Pots this way by boating conspicuously larger Amberjack & Cobia. Had I fished w/lighter gear it's a safe bet I could only report the "line goes pop usually every time...."
    what kind of gear does a brute like you use when hauling fish off a wreck? Im sure you have a setup buried amidst the warehouse of fishing supplies you own. What style lever and pulley does one hoist a bony fish from the depths of the sea?
  • TarponatorTarponator Under a BridgePosts: 17,010 AG
    Would enjoy learning how "a casting reel with levewind" will enhance "casting accuracy"?

    You're focused too much on the "levelwind" part and too little on the "casting" part.

    Said more directly, I'm much more accurate with a casting reel than a spinning one...and it's not even close. And if you sight fish for tarpon like I do, casting accuracy is paramount -- of course, if you're pulling grouper off the bottom or bait fishing for sharks, and your last experience with a levewind reel was as you describe, I can understand why one might shy away.

    But let's not forget that "modern reels" have advanced since the Mitchell 300 and Sealine 27H/47H -- to include levelwinds that don't break under high drag -- as evidenced by the 20 odd years I've been using the Calcutta 400 with levelwind on large inshore fish without incident:

    63774098.nTycqHdm.jpg

    So, keep on using casting reels without levelwinds if you are that worried about them breaking, and I will continue to catch fish with them. To each his own, but it isn't 1960 any more and casting reel technology has come a long way since then.

    I hope this explains my earlier comments a bit more. Take care....Mike
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 AG
    Suggest you always read thru a thread completely before sticky head in noose.
    Reel Teal wrote: »
    what kind of gear does a brute like you use when hauling fish off a wreck? Im sure you have a setup buried amidst the warehouse of fishing supplies you own. What style lever and pulley does one hoist a bony fish from the depths of the sea?
    I use 6/0 size reel & 80 lb line, on 'extra heavy' rod

    Use a Daiwa Sealine 600H, 80 lb green Ande & Daiwa Sealine graphite rod. As far as "a setup buried amidst the warehouse of fishing supplies" it stays on the active duty rack, NOT in the collection of over 1000 reels.

    PS: It's common to see Party Boat anglers intentionally "put the rod on the railing". No need to be "Sorry". What's rare is for me to hook into such big fish that fight so hard they can force the rod down onto the railing. Got the Pot winning Cobia near the end of the last drop, after the top contenders had already bought the beer in their minds. The big Cobia made their best fish look like Guppies. Capt didn't need to bring out the scale. Was definitely a "high horse" nearly $200 after tipping mates.
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 AG
    You're out of focus too much on the post I replied to.
    Tarponator wrote: »
    You're focused too much on the "levelwind" part and too little on the "casting" (as opposed to "spinning") part.
    Tarponator wrote: »
    I've caught more than a few 100lb+ tarpon on a Calcutta 400 -- with a levelwind....and in under 15 minutes.

    I've never had the first problem with the levelwind -- and I've been doing this for almost two decades now. Don't believe everything you read.

    The reason I use a casting reel with levewind is simple -- casting accuracy.

    Having fished regularly ever since the 1960's the experience has shown me that "I'm much more accurate with a (spinning) reel than a (casting) one...and it's not even close". And that doesn't even "focus on the level wind part" at all.

    But casting with conventional reels has been less likely to birds nest & has longer distance for me, if they aren't level wind.
  • TarponatorTarponator Under a BridgePosts: 17,010 AG
    Sometimes it's hard to teach an old dog new tricks. :shrug

    My advice for the OP: Focus on people who actually do what you inquired about -- inshore fishing for large fish. People like Capt. LeMay, who has been doing this professionally for decades now -- and not people who mistakenly think modern inshore casting reels with levelwinds have "cockeyed geometry of line playing out against out of phase level wind gate", or people who would rather argue than help.

    This will be my last post in this thread. Take care....Mike
  • Turner River TerrorTurner River Terror Posts: 8,019 Admiral
    Nice Picture there Mike. Did that a time or two myself, good memories.

    I'm a Spinner guy myself but that could be because that's all I've ever used and I can skip baits under the Mangroves with the best of them...
    Killin and Grillin :grin
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 AG
    Tarponator wrote: »
    and not people who mistakenly think modern inshore casting reels with levelwinds have "cockeyed geometry of line playing out against out of phase level wind gate", or people who would rather argue than help.

    Or generally available online advice like:

    "If you talk to any repair shop owner (and I can testify to this) the incident of repairs for open wind reels is well below that of level wind reels. There is not a big mystery here – the additional moving parts put pressure on a line, a grain of sand gets caught up in a gear and failing to ensure that the entire reel is thoroughly cleaned and lubricated means that the level wind reel has a higher chance to break down. There is not a single level wind reel manufacturer that is excluded from these breakdowns so just spending more money on a higher end level wind reel won’t result in a lower likelihood of breakdown."

    http://bestfishingknots.com/blog/level-wind-reels-pros-and-cons/

    "On a final note, as a repair shop owner, I would be remiss if I didn’t tell you that the level wind feature is at the top of the repair parade of reels we see each year. This is exclusive of manufacturer. All level winds from all manufacturers are susceptible to failure. It’s just the nature of the designs. A very small pawl runs across an equally small worm gear. When fighting a large fish with 15-20 pounds of drag, the line guide system is under a tremendous amount of pressure. Then we throw in some salt and some sand, and maybe we don’t clean and lube the reel like we know we should. All of these factors can increase the potential for a failure. Open faced conventional reels know no such failure."

    http://www.saltwaterfishing247.com/Article/level-wind-reels-pros-and-cons-Page1.htm
  • seajay-1seajay-1 Posts: 4,736 Captain
    Thanks for reminding me why I had quit participating in threads where you're already the self proclaimed expert... I'm out... It's all yours...

    So true.
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 AG
    cj doesn't have to take my word for it. Read what repair shop owners said.
    seajay-1 wrote: »
    So true.

    The Conventional Wisdom suggests that this is Common Knowledge
  • seajay-1seajay-1 Posts: 4,736 Captain
    cj doesn't have to take my word for it. Read what repair shop owners said.



    The Conventional Wisdom suggests that this is Common Knowledge
    Well CJ does not need a repair shop to fine tune his gear. He knows how to tune a reel to alleviate your issues with a LW and inhance your ability to use your antique gear. I have and use antique Penn 10s and 109s with no issues. They are more for fun. I prefer my 6500s for everyday fishing. The only spinner I use is for weightless jerk baits on flats for Reds. I have one #10 set up that will reach 150yards with no problems, tossing 4 oz.

    Post #39 is irrefutable.
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 AG
    Who was talking about any "need... to fine tune" gear?
    seajay-1 wrote: »
    Well CJ does not need a repair shop to fine tune his gear.

    Post #39 is irrefutable.

    Attempts to deny such sweeping statements made by repair shops owners pretty much discredit what "CJ does".
  • seajay-1seajay-1 Posts: 4,736 Captain
    Who was talking about any "need... to fine tune" gear?



    Attempts to deny such sweeping statements made by repair shops owners pretty much discredit what "CJ does".

    See post # 39. A little advice, do not lay your reels in the sand. :idiot
  • bmoodybmoody Posts: 987 Officer
    Wade B: Your current gear for bass, walleye, pike, and musky can all be serviceable for inshore species like snook, red drum, black drum, spotted sea trout, crevel jack, and even some tarpon and others; then offshore I'm sure you have gear suitable for pitching to dolphin, king mackerel, sailfish, and little tunny or dropping down for snappers (at least on the drift on east coast). That isn't to say your gear matches exactly what is on most boats around florida. I say use it, learn, even if the hard way getting **** once or twice, and be sure you rinse it off after every use. Don't try to pitch hogleg mullet to 30+ snook on bridges in heavy tide with your 8lb spinners you used with crawler harnesses, but they will be fine to pitch jigs and plugs to trout and reds. Fish are fish, current is current, and structure is structure -- salt doesn't add that much mystery, but you still have to respect how the sheer size of some of the fish gets coupled with the structure, current, and greater prevelance of deeply forked tails on the fish (one indication of swimming power/speed).

    As others have mentioned levelwind reels can be quite serviceable -- I've caught king mackerel to 40+ pounds, multiple sailfish, bonita (little tunny), jacks, snapper, smaller grouper, and other assorted bottom fish on my Abu Garcia 7000. My Penn #9 has been OK for a guest/back up rig for drift fishing snapper here off the Palm Beaches.
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 AG
    Dude! The guy is coming down from the Great Lakes.
    seajay-1 wrote: »
    See post # 39. A little advice, do not lay your reels in the sand. :idiot

    Don't try to lecture me about sand, deny the high failure rate of level wind, or thoughtlessly insult a fellow from Michigan who was only looking for "A little advice".
  • Wade BWade B Posts: 259 Deckhand
    bmoody wrote: »
    Wade B: Your current gear for bass, walleye, pike, and musky can all be serviceable for inshore species like snook, red drum, black drum, spotted sea trout, crevel jack, and even some tarpon and others; then offshore I'm sure you have gear suitable for pitching to dolphin, king mackerel, sailfish, and little tunny or dropping down for snappers (at least on the drift on east coast). That isn't to say your gear matches exactly what is on most boats around florida. I say use it, learn, even if the hard way getting **** once or twice, and be sure you rinse it off after every use. Don't try to pitch hogleg mullet to 30+ snook on bridges in heavy tide with your 8lb spinners you used with crawler harnesses, but they will be fine to pitch jigs and plugs to trout and reds. Fish are fish, current is current, and structure is structure -- salt doesn't add that much mystery, but you still have to respect how the sheer size of some of the fish gets coupled with the structure, current, and greater prevelance of deeply forked tails on the fish (one indication of swimming power/speed).

    As others have mentioned levelwind reels can be quite serviceable -- I've caught king mackerel to 40+ pounds, multiple sailfish, bonita (little tunny), jacks, snapper, smaller grouper, and other assorted bottom fish on my Abu Garcia 7000. My Penn #9 has been OK for a guest/back up rig for drift fishing snapper here off the Palm Beaches.

    That's kind of where I'm leaning. The Sealine 47 reels (if they don't sell) could be OK reels for me being a beginner. If I lose a fish or they burn up, replace them. It's a learning curve.

    Who knows, I have time to learn and decide.
  • PilchardPilchard Posts: 1,373 Officer
    Fibber- you are simply wrong about modern casting reels with level winds. I agree that the technology from yester-year was insufficient but quality level winds in various sizes will catch anything that swims in the inshore waters of florida without having mechanical failure. In fact modern casting reels including those with level winds are more durable than spinning reels in my opinion. I have caught hundreds of tarpon on a medium heavy plug outfit without fail where even a quality spinner will be shot after one season of tarpon fishing.

    Your idea that a spinner will cast further than a casting outfit is also false. As line dumps off of a spinner, it is restricted by the spool as well as the guides as the coils are condensed by the guides as they shrink in size. A casting outfit's spool has little to no resistance depending on how it is set. I guarantee that anyone that is highly skilled with a casting outfit can throw a lure, especially one that has significant weight, further and more accurately than someone who is equally as skilled with a spinner with the same rod length and line diameter.
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 AG
    Please be sure to contact the repair shop owners to tell them they "are simply wrong" & get them to take their websites down.
    Pilchard wrote: »
    Fibber- you are simply wrong about modern casting reels with level winds.

    Also be sure to tell them they aren't "simply wrong" about level winds repair issues, but try to convince them level winds cast as far as casting reels w/o LW.
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