Spinning rod build question

I'm building a pair of spinning rods for offshore pitch rods and maybe use them as snapper rods too. I've already bought my components but wondering if my guides go down too small. The blanks are MHX 7' Heavy from their saltwater series. Using the Fuji K series double foot alconite guides. The guide layout I planned on using was 30, 25, 20, 16, 10, 8, 8 and 8 at the tip. They're being built for Diawa Saltist 4500H's with 50lb PP Super Slick. Leader material used will probably be between 30-80lb mono or flouro, just depends on what they're being used for that day.

So I tied up some of the power pro with some 60lb flouro I have and they seem to travel through the size 8 guides ok but they look a little tight. Should I go bigger or stick with what I have? Thanks for any advice you can give.

Replies

  • Ol'DirtyCasterOl'DirtyCaster Posts: 2,270 Captain
    I use 5.5mm running guides on my heavy spinners.
  • a-salt-weapona-salt-weapon Posts: 203 Deckhand
    8's will be fine. I'd choke all the guides down and use 6's for the runners if it were for me though.
  • cdipasqualecdipasquale Posts: 58 Greenhorn
    Really, that small? What is the advantage to going smaller. I'm new to rod building so not questioning your judgment, just like to understand why I'm doing something. My thought was larger rings would let the knots flow through easier.
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 3,031 Captain
    As a long time rodbuilder for both bluewater and inshore I particularly dislike the current trend toward smaller guides on all kinds of rods. I swear that the folks who came up with them have never used any kind of long leader then dealt with the serious problem of knots unable to be wound on for casting or when you're right at the boat with a very big fish at close quarters when you must not do any "high sticking".... I consider 8.0mm guides the absolutely smallest that I'll go with period - and for your schedule it would go from 16 to two 12's, two 10's, then an 8 as the very last guide on the rod before the tiptop.... The tip top itself needs at least an 8 ring -a 10 ring is better...
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • a-salt-weapona-salt-weapon Posts: 203 Deckhand
    You just don't need big guides with braid. I like to keep everything as streamline as possible. Your goal is to tighten down the "coils" coming off the spinning reel as quickly as possiblebe during a cast. What you have will work, but you can go smaller and probably cast just as good maybe better. 6mm guides will pass knots just fine and reduce a very small amount of weight from the tip section. BKWAG 30, BKLAG 16, BKTAG 10 then all BKTAG 6,s is from a similar build I just did. Casts like a dream with a 8000 sustain and 50 lb braid. Passed knots with 50 mono just fine.
  • a-salt-weapona-salt-weapon Posts: 203 Deckhand
    I just double checked and I have been using 8's. Not 6's. 30, 16, 10 and all 8's.
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 3,031 Captain
    For those that think small guides are a great idea, use a rod's length of 80lb mono as a tarpon leader then try to come up with any knot that will actually be small (and also strong ..)enough to make it past that first tiny guide... And for those that use larger leaders (when we fish big snook with live bait 60lb might not be heavy enough to survive what a 20lb snook can do to a leader...) and I won't even mention fishing around downed trees... A really big fish at the boat will mean lots of back and forth at point blank range where you can't afford even slightest leader hang up on a small guide with fish that routinely break rods if they're not used correctly or you foul a guide at close quarters.

    Now for anyone casting arti's at big fish you can get by with short leaders (since a heavy leader and small guides just won't work...). But you're still going to be working with an awkward amount of leader hanging that lure out of position instead of where it needs to be for accurate distance casting. Offshore you can get away with "to whom it may concern" casting - inshore if you're not on the money you simply won't get the bite... We occasionally have the great fun of working good sized cobia around the various markers around the coast of the Everglades. A three foot leader (something short enough to be do-able with those tiny guides...) will be bad news when your beautiful, big cobia goes racing around that same marker where you hooked him. Even a seven foot leader might not be enough -but at least you have a chance... Iv'e learned about this sort of stuff the hard way since periodically one of my anglers will bring a really nice brand new rod that just isn't up to the task because of how it was designed by the manufacturer...

    Here endeth the sermon (and I'll get down off of my soapbox).

    Be a hero..... take a kid fishing.
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • Ol'DirtyCasterOl'DirtyCaster Posts: 2,270 Captain
    The great thing about building rods is that they're custom tailored for your style of fishing. Capt. Bob's rods would have no place among my gear, and I'm sure he would feel the same way about mine. My leaders extend from the tip of my rod to the stripper typically, not an issue since my braid is connected to a 4' section of 30lb class. A short section of 60lb flouro is connected to that. I have to break off a fish occasionally, and if I were using a straight 80lb leader that would be pretty much impossible. Seeing as how the market price for 500yds of top shelf 40lb hollow core is about 100$, I'm going to defer to my own experiences when it comes to setting up my builds. Bob isn't landing 70" fish on foot, and I'm not fishing mangroves. You have to find what works for you.
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