What finish to put on my project 14 ft panga?

larrywittlarrywitt Posts: 2,610 Moderator
Most of my fishing is offshore so for years I had the wish to have a small skiff to do the shallow water bite. Well about 2005 or so at one of the FS expos at Ft Myers there was a dealer who had a 14 FT Panga skiff on the floor. Well it caught my interest very basic (3) bench seats, no floor, small bow casting deck, no motor, floats in 6 inches. Max hp. 30. Well after a test ride on one that had a 15 hp. on it road good cut through boat wakes with no pounding and I bought one. Well I am on the third revision an I hope the final one.
It is now powered by a 25HP. Suzuki 4 stroke V twin.

Well my first two designs were put together fast and not well done as far as material used but I did learn from my many mistakes.
Now the final design ( I hope) is in the finishing stages.
Question is what is the most durable top beck finish for the front casting deck and other surfaces the I will be walking on, dropping a cast net on ,anchor and chain.
What holds up best for the dollar spent?

Gel coat.
Perfection.
AWL grip.
Or other options?
I will post pictures of the project as it stands
Have to go to work now.
Thanks .
larrywitt

Replies

  • Salty Dawg44Salty Dawg44 Homosassa, FLPosts: 919 Officer
    I've done several rebuilds, such as my 1984 Chris Craft, and use Petit Easypoxy. Mixed with a little non-skid grit on the decks and straight rolled and tipped for the rest of the hull and topsides. Application is easy, and it holds up well when cured.








    Right now I am redoing a 1977 John Dory 16' skiff and will use the same finish when it is done.

    MY WORST FEAR......THAT WHEN I DIE MY WIFE WILL SELL ALL MY BOATS & FISHING GEAR FOR WHAT I TOLD HER I PAID FOR IT.......

    I may not always agree with what you say,
    but I will always respect your right to be wrong!
  • larrywittlarrywitt Posts: 2,610 Moderator
    Have to ad the Easypoxy to the list. Nice work on your boats.
    larrywitt
  • FS DanFS Dan Posts: 2,348 Moderator
    I think Backlash will chime in, but I believe that Awl-grip LPU is the toughest, but its expensive. He will correct Me if I'm wrong and could probably write a doctoral thesis on paint. :)
    A general rule is that the two-part paints have a harder finish as oppose to the one-part paints which are softer.

    FSD
    Formerly Catmandew
  • larrywittlarrywitt Posts: 2,610 Moderator
    I am leaning to the two part paints from what i read online, of course they all say theirs is the best.
    larrywitt
  • larrywittlarrywitt Posts: 2,610 Moderator
    Here are some images of poor quality plywood exterior grade big box looks like after a few years. It was sealed on the bottom with one coat of epoxy top had a seal coat and one layer of glass mat and then covered with product called TUFF COAT water based kind of a rubber finish.

    The Panga construction traps water in the in the wells between the seats along the sides. Not a good situation if you want a floor. I am going to fill this with foam build up and just lay there.



    I am now using marine grade plywood 15/32 more epoxy and cloth on bottom and two layers of glass mat on top and multiple coats of resin on the ends to seal the wood.
    Well there you have it I am at the bottom rung of the learning curve.
    As long as it floats and I can catch fish in skinny water.
    That's why I asked about the deck finish and what to use and should I finish the underside as one more protective coat.
    thanks larrywitt
  • BacklashBacklash Posts: 880 Officer
    My doctoral thesis:
    Hands down winner for "what holds up best for the $ spent" is gelcoat. Very durable, costs about the same as hi quality latex paint.
    but you are using epoxy resin, and gelcoat (polyester resin) does not bond to epoxy, without the use of specialty polyester primers (which cost much more than your gelcoat)... So, gelcoat is out the picture.

    LPU's (linear polyurethane) are going to give you the most durable finish of the paints. Awlgrip is an LPU with a bit of polyester in it. there are several others by other manufacturers like Sterling, Alexseal, etc. But, you cannot just apply the LPU directly to the glasswork. It needs to be primed with an epoxy primer such as Awlgrip 545, or Interlux Epoxy Primekote, etc....So prices escalate rapidly. Here's what you'd need :
    Epoxy Primer (Awlgrip 545)
    Epoxy hardener (Awlgrip 545 converter)
    Epoxy reducer (Awlgrip T0006)

    Topcoat (Awlgrip LPU)
    Topcoat catalyst (Awlgrip G3010 if spraying, can't recall the converter # for brushing)
    topcoat reducer ( Awlgrip spray reducer, fast spray reducer, or brushing reducer)

    Ideally you want to apply two coats of epoxy primer, sand it w/ 220, vac clean, solvent wash it, and apply three coats of the topcoat. Methodology will of course vary greatly based on your plan of application, ie- brush/roll, spray, etc.

    Next durable after the LPU, are going to be the aliphatic acrylic urethanes. Some examples are Awlcraft 2000, and the Imron 600 series.
    Very good products, very durable, but not quite the longevity of the LPU. Use the same primers, application is generally spray only.

    Then we start getting into the alkyd modified urethanes, which are really simply oil based enamels fortified with a little polyurethane. Examples are Salty Dawgs Easypoxy, Interlux Briteside, Interlux Toplac, etc, etc.
    Ambient cured (1 part) paints are nowhere near as durable as chemically cured/ cross linked paints. But with the correct prep, priming and application they can do pretty **** good. Follow the manufacturers instructions for the primers, etc. Interlux Prekote is their rec'ed primer under their 1 part paints.

    There are other specialty products out there worth researching like bed liners, kiwi grip, etc. most come and go like a fad.
    Awlgrip stays in fashion like denim jeans... Because it works.
  • FS DanFS Dan Posts: 2,348 Moderator
    :Agree :grin


    FSD
    Formerly Catmandew
  • larrywittlarrywitt Posts: 2,610 Moderator
    Well it looks like AWL grip is the one. Now I will have to visit you tube to help with the learning curve.
    Thanks for your much needed help.
    larrywitt
  • larrywittlarrywitt Posts: 2,610 Moderator
    I am in the final stages of putting on the 545 primer coat maybe today. I have a small can of none skid material RUST OLEUM anti slip additive, it is a crystalline silica material. Is there any reason I could not use this for my non skid surface. The amount and cost of AWL grip material way more than I need .
    It will be used with the AWL Grip top coat when I am at that stage.
    thanks
    larrywitt
  • FS DanFS Dan Posts: 2,348 Moderator
    I think you will be ok using it for your non-skid. Unless the product can be broken down with your paints solvents, it will just be encapsulated in the paint.

    FSD
    Formerly Catmandew
  • BacklashBacklash Posts: 880 Officer
    Chances are you crystal-sil aggregate will be fine in the LPU.
    The inherent problem though, is that Awlgrip is a much slicker paint film than whatever Rustoleum product that was designed to go into. Even the Awlgrip Griptex coarse grit can be pretty slick if there's not quite enough grit, or your seal coat over the top is too thick.
    My advice would be to use a whole lot of the grit, more than you think you need... How are you applying it btw?

    You can also stop in your local Sherwin Williams and pick up a can of their H&C sharkskin aggregate. That is polypropylene. I used it on my Sidewinder. Came out good, I used a little more than 4 times the recommended amount though. Sprayed it on slow, watching the build up to ensure continuity in the appearance and effectiveness of it...
  • larrywittlarrywitt Posts: 2,610 Moderator
    I will be rolling and tipping, I watched a youtube video where he sprinkled it on a wet coat then blew excess off with low pressure air then where he saw shiny spots would re apply to these then blew off excess again. The applied two coats of finish or more if needed.
    larrywitt
  • FS DanFS Dan Posts: 2,348 Moderator
    I saw a similar if not same video and was planning on rolling my non-skid. BL how is the aggregate when shooting thru the gun. Do you use a larger orifice tip on the gun to keep it from clogging? What are your thoughts and recommendations when rolling?

    FSD
    Formerly Catmandew
  • BacklashBacklash Posts: 880 Officer
    Shooting it through a gun is by far the best way to ensure a uniform distribution of the aggregate. No, just use the tip/nozzle you'd use to shoot straight LPU, but open up the material flow a bit more, and hold the gun further away from your substrate when shooting the nonskid.

    If your rolling it, I'd put on your first two coats, then immediately sprinkle the grit on while the second coat is wet. blow off the excess like you said. And then quickly apply only one topcoat over that. If you do two topcoats over the grit, your going to bury the grit and loose a great deal of your nonskid properties.
  • larrywittlarrywitt Posts: 2,610 Moderator
    Well I just put a coat of paint on this morning over the non skid I sprinkled on last night while the top coat was still tacky. It will be non skid for sure very aggressive texture. May be too aggressive. Will it wear down or should I put another coat of finish on after about 12 hours cure time?
    larrywitt
  • FS DanFS Dan Posts: 2,348 Moderator
    Best of luck with that Larry, let us know how it turns out.

    FSD
    Formerly Catmandew
  • BacklashBacklash Posts: 880 Officer
    Sounds like that rust oleum stuff is pretty substantial. I'm aware that time has passed and you've probably already finished it one way or another... But yeah, if you have the profile of the aggregate, then an additional coat of Awlgrip will be beneficial to the longevity of the nonskid. It's just a fine line to walk before the aggregate begins to get buried under the paint film.
    The other thing to keep in mind, and it's a biggie, is that when your are applying multiple coats of urethane there is a brief window of when you can hot coat the subsequent coats. Hot coat meaning, applying a coat over the prior coat without abrading it in any way.
    If you just apply over a dried coat without any sanding, abrasion, etc, you will experience adhesion failure and it can begin to lift off in sheets in extreme cases.
    When spraying it, I wait about a half hour between coats, no more than an hour. I would think though that your probably ok until a full cure of the existing finish occurs, which would be about 72 hours, or slightly less considering our ideal ambient conditions in FL.... But I'm really not sure, it's a question for the Akzo Nobel techies.
    I know there is usually still a open molecule chain in the film which will supply a sufficient chemical bond, and once the cure occurs the chain is gone.
    But Awlgrip is unique in the way that it has a clear coat which migrates to the surface as it dries/cures... And that very well may affect how a hot coat will adhere.
    As far as sanding a nonskid surface... Obviously you cannot outright sand it without loosing your grit. The key there is to hit it lightly with fine scotchbrites just enough to knock the sheen off, then clean, solvent wash, and proceed.
    I hope it works out/ worked out good for you... And we need pics!
  • larrywittlarrywitt Posts: 2,610 Moderator
    Here are some images of the texture that I ended up with bow section has more grit stern where I drive less bout still non skid.

    I still have two more areas to do. I will take a picture of the mid section that I made a template for that is functional.
    It is made out of Pressure treated exterior grade trim lumber to see how it would work out, it spans both bench seats and opens in the middle. This will then be made the same way as the bow with a regular hatch or two.
    larrywitt
  • larrywittlarrywitt Posts: 2,610 Moderator
    Here is the center section as of this morning.
    I may use the boat for awhile before start the mid section and the area where the gas tank sits. As I use it more options come to mind. There are fish out there waiting to play. The other boat is feeling neglected just sitting in the water as the kings are swimming by.
    Or if we get a run on bad weather for offshore runs I may start sooner.:shrug
    larrywitt
  • jawzjawz Posts: 137 Officer
    larrywitt wrote: »
    Here are some images of poor quality plywood exterior grade big box looks like after a few years. It was sealed on the bottom with one coat of epoxy top had a seal coat and one layer of glass mat and then covered with product called TUFF COAT water based kind of a rubber finish.

    The Panga construction traps water in the in the wells between the seats along the sides. Not a good situation if you want a floor. I am going to fill this with foam build up and just lay there.



    I am now using marine grade plywood 15/32 more epoxy and cloth on bottom and two layers of glass mat on top and multiple coats of resin on the ends to seal the wood.
    Well there you have it I am at the bottom rung of the learning curve.
    As long as it floats and I can catch fish in skinny water.
    That's why I asked about the deck finish and what to use and should I finish the underside as one more protective coat.
    thanks larrywitt


    a better way to do that:


    as you can see wood isn't a good choice - pressure treated wood,from home depot/lowes is never a good choice


    a smart move:

    make a false deck - use a good composite like Penske board(coosa) drop that down and make the deck flat...

    composites will save in weight...


    foam ?? you're gonna fill the void with foam ???
  • larrywittlarrywitt Posts: 2,610 Moderator
    I thought about that,at this point I am leaning towards no foam. Being a Panga style build it has flotation built into the hull construction. I will have total access too the area under the deck through the hatches for added storage if needed. And who knows there may be another change down the road.
    larrywitt
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