Home Politics

No American who works full-time should live in poverty.

2456714

Replies

  • mikevmikev Posts: 10,822 AG
    Provide . .provide a home, food, clothing, etc . . just for yourself at a minimum (hence my comment at the very least).

    Thanks. Tackle the home first. How big of a home? Tent, box, apartment, house, tree fort? What is the minimum that it takes to survive?
    "The only people that tell you it can't be done are the people who haven't done it themselves."
  • Conchy CrackerConchy Cracker Posts: 10,454 Officer
    mikev wrote: »
    SWFL_F1s0n should know. He said "provide". I just asked for clarification. You started that, but we need more details.

    But you said not that much.... So how much is that?
  • SWFL_F1sh0nSWFL_F1sh0n Posts: 17,248 Officer
    Provide . .provide a home, food, clothing, etc . . just for yourself at a minimum (hence my comment at the very least).
    mikev wrote: »
    SWFL_F1s0n should know. He said "provide". I just asked for clarification. You started that, but we need more details.

    What are you asking?
  • SWFL_F1sh0nSWFL_F1sh0n Posts: 17,248 Officer
    mikev wrote: »
    Thanks. Tackle the home first. How big of a home? Tent, box, apartment, house, tree fort? What is the minimum that it takes to survive?

    Thats the problem with people like you . . you want to know what it takes to survive, not what it takes to live.
  • gregglgreggl Posts: 21,594 Officer
    It works out to around $15/hour to pay a human to work and they can play someone to house them and feed themselves.

    Below that, and someone other agent is subsidizing the remainder.
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 23,346 AG
    fins4me wrote: »
    For the most part people are paid in direct relation to their contribution or importance toward the conclusion of a productive enterprise... Some provide minimal contribution and are paid accordingly.

    That seems to be fair.


    walmart, mcdonalds etc RELY ON THEIR EMPLOYEES. Yet don't pay them a living wage. Sure, it's not rocket science they are doing but the mother ship IS COMPLETELY DEPENDENT ON THEM for survival. Seems as if that would matter.
  • mikevmikev Posts: 10,822 AG
    Thats the problem with people like you . . you want to know what it takes to survive, not what it takes to live.

    You SURE I said survive? I think CC brought it up first in the attempt to answer. So now, it's not survival, it's "living". What is "living" in your estimation? You can use the home as an example.
    "The only people that tell you it can't be done are the people who haven't done it themselves."
  • Conchy CrackerConchy Cracker Posts: 10,454 Officer
    fins4me wrote: »
    For the most part people are paid in direct relation to their contribution or importance toward the conclusion of a productive enterprise... Some provide minimal contribution and are paid accordingly.

    That seems to be fair.
    That would mean farmers should be near the bottom of the list.
  • gunby31gunby31 Posts: 5,777 Officer
    Cyclist wrote: »
    In fact, the American taxpayer is subsidizing these enormously profitable corporations through the food stamp, Earned Income Tax Credits (EITC), and other aid programs these employees qualify for because they are being paid so little. In 2004, a study published by the University of California-Berkeley Labor Center found that Walmart employees in California were receiving $86 million in public assistance. A documentary also was made, based on the study. Walmart attempted to refute the study by arguing that the reliance on public assistance by their workers was not substantially different from that of the employees of their competitors. Of course, their market dominance almost certainly has had a deflationary effect on wages throughout their industry as many competitors keep prices and wages low in order to compete.
    Subsequent to the Berkeley study, there were studies in other states showing similar levels of reliance on public assistance by Walmart employees. A 2004 Congressional committee staff report estimated that the total amount of public assistance received by Walmart employees each year could have been as much as $1.5 billion. A 2014 report said the amount of government aid to Walmart employes had reached $6.2 billion.

    Walmart’s low-wage workers cost U.S. taxpayers an estimated $6.2 billion in public assistance including food stamps, Medicaid and subsidized housing, according to a report published to coincide with Tax Day, April 15.
    Americans for Tax Fairness, a coalition of 400 national and state-level progressive groups, made this estimate using data from a 2013 study by Democratic Staff of the U.S. Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    Walmart’s annual profits are approaching $100 billion. If the company's average wage was raised to $15.80 an hour, accounting for slightly higher pay for supervisors and managers, or annually, an average of $30,576, that would be a living wage. Walmart’s profits would be reduced somewhere in the range of $15 billion. And that only would occur if their employees didn't spend more money in their stores. But history shows that is not what would happen. Some percentage of that increase would be returned to Walmart through employee purchases.
    Imagine what would happen throughout the economy if every major employer had to pay at least $14.50 per hour, twice the current minimum wage. There would be no one left in the current classification of “low wage.”.

    This is 1000% correct. Please, would one of you rwnj's please counter this? Let's hear it.
  • Conchy CrackerConchy Cracker Posts: 10,454 Officer
    Thats the problem with people like you . . you want to know what it takes to survive, not what it takes to live.

    Not everyone gets a 3 bedroom house and 2 cars in the drive. Everyone should have the opportunity which the current minimum wage does not allow.
  • gregglgreggl Posts: 21,594 Officer
    Its not just Walmart..
    If you've done a business plan in the past 4 or 5 years, these are the basic numbers to engage a W2 employee.
  • fins4mefins4me Posts: 14,487 AG
    That would mean farmers should be near the bottom of the list.

    Seems the commodity and livestock markets do not agree.
    ALLISON XB 21,, MERCURY 300 Opti Max Pro Series (Slightly Modified) You can't catch me!!!
    "Today is MINE"
  • SWFL_F1sh0nSWFL_F1sh0n Posts: 17,248 Officer
    fins4me wrote: »
    Seems the commodity and livestock markets do not agree.

    Have you looked at the commodity markets in the last year?
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 23,346 AG
    Farmers get government subsides for not farming and have government insurance for being bad farmers. :blowkiss
  • SWFL_F1sh0nSWFL_F1sh0n Posts: 17,248 Officer
    mikev wrote: »
    Thanks. Tackle the home first. How big of a home? Tent, box, apartment, house, tree fort? What is the minimum that it takes to survive?
    mikev wrote: »
    You SURE I said survive? I think CC brought it up first in the attempt to answer. So now, it's not survival, it's "living". What is "living" in your estimation? You can use the home as an example.
    Yeah, I'm sure you said survive and the answer is 150% of Poverty.
  • Conchy CrackerConchy Cracker Posts: 10,454 Officer
    fins4me wrote: »
    For the most part people are paid in direct relation to their contribution or importance toward the conclusion of a productive enterprise... Some provide minimal contribution and are paid accordingly.

    That seems to be fair.
    fins4me wrote: »
    Seems the commodity and livestock markets do not agree.

    What do the markets have to do with your original statement?

    A farmer can be replaced with robots and a well trained monkey, it's the land that contributes.
  • mikevmikev Posts: 10,822 AG
    Yeah, I'm sure you said survive and the answer is 150% of Poverty.

    No, my response was to CC after he mentioned it. Anyway, not important to the story. What is 150% of poverty?
    "The only people that tell you it can't be done are the people who haven't done it themselves."
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 23,346 AG

    Don't worry, the taxpayers will take up the slack so we are ensured a constant supply of high fructose corn syrup, white bread, and cheap health killing meat.
  • SWFL_F1sh0nSWFL_F1sh0n Posts: 17,248 Officer
    mikev wrote: »
    No, my response was to CC after he mentioned it. Anyway, not important to the story. What is 150% of poverty?

    Poverty *1.5

    or in RPN

    Poverty - Enter
    1.5 *
  • mikevmikev Posts: 10,822 AG
    Poverty *1.5

    How about in your area?
    "The only people that tell you it can't be done are the people who haven't done it themselves."
  • SWFL_F1sh0nSWFL_F1sh0n Posts: 17,248 Officer
    mikev wrote: »
    How about in your area?

    What about my area are you asking?
  • mikevmikev Posts: 10,822 AG
    What about my area are you asking?

    What's the poverty level? In dollars, please.
    "The only people that tell you it can't be done are the people who haven't done it themselves."
  • SWFL_F1sh0nSWFL_F1sh0n Posts: 17,248 Officer
    mikev wrote: »
    What's the poverty level? In dollars, please.

    No idea . . I am not aware of a place to find poverty income by zip code. However the onus is on the local and state governments to increase the minimum wage above the federally mandated say $15 a hour to meet that requirement (or whatever arbitrary # the local governments would like to use). Not only would it make it more granular, but also give more control back to the state and regional governments.
  • fins4mefins4me Posts: 14,487 AG
    Have you looked at the commodity markets in the last year?
    I keep an eye on the ones that count.

    US Calendar Year Average Corn Price Received
    for the 2000 - 2013 Calendar Year(s)
    Year Corn ( $/bushel )
    2000 1.86
    2001 1.89
    2002 2.13
    2003 2.27
    2004 2.47
    2005 1.96
    2006 2.28
    2007 3.39
    2008 4.78
    2009 3.75
    2010 3.83
    2011 6.01
    2012 6.67
    2013 6.15

    14 of these were mine from last week.

    Feeder Steers Medium and Large 1 - 2
    Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price
    3 225-240 235 350.00-390.00 371.28
    4 250-295 278 327.50-400.00 355.55
    10 305-345 325 300.00-350.00 324.51
    11 355-390 374 290.00-311.00 302.85
    18 400-440 419 252.50-292.50 276.28
    12 450-495 478 245.00-287.50 276.09
    13 500-545 522 228.00-265.00 252.12
    1 500-500 500 278.00 278.00 Fancy
    16 500-521 509 273.00-279.00 276.34 Value Added
    17 550-592 574 218.00-241.00 229.73
    18 607-645 624 211.00-227.50 221.68
    15 655-690 677 200.00-220.00 212.74
    2 700-705 703 200.00-205.00 202.49
    Medium and Large 3
    3 360-395 372 225.00-235.00 228.54
    5 410-422 420 220.00-223.00 222.41
    5 485-490 488 211.00-219.00 216.81
    7 515-540 531 209.00-217.50 215.30
    ALLISON XB 21,, MERCURY 300 Opti Max Pro Series (Slightly Modified) You can't catch me!!!
    "Today is MINE"
  • SWFL_F1sh0nSWFL_F1sh0n Posts: 17,248 Officer
    fins4me wrote: »
    I keep an eye on the ones that count.

    US Calendar Year Average Corn Price Received
    for the 2000 - 2013 Calendar Year(s)
    Year Corn ( $/bushel )
    2000 1.86
    2001 1.89
    2002 2.13
    2003 2.27
    2004 2.47
    2005 1.96
    2006 2.28
    2007 3.39
    2008 4.78
    2009 3.75
    2010 3.83
    2011 6.01
    2012 6.67
    2013 6.15

    14 of these were mine from last week.

    Feeder Steers Medium and Large 1 - 2
    Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price
    3 225-240 235 350.00-390.00 371.28
    4 250-295 278 327.50-400.00 355.55
    10 305-345 325 300.00-350.00 324.51
    11 355-390 374 290.00-311.00 302.85
    18 400-440 419 252.50-292.50 276.28
    12 450-495 478 245.00-287.50 276.09
    13 500-545 522 228.00-265.00 252.12
    1 500-500 500 278.00 278.00 Fancy
    16 500-521 509 273.00-279.00 276.34 Value Added
    17 550-592 574 218.00-241.00 229.73
    18 607-645 624 211.00-227.50 221.68
    15 655-690 677 200.00-220.00 212.74
    2 700-705 703 200.00-205.00 202.49
    Medium and Large 3
    3 360-395 372 225.00-235.00 228.54
    5 410-422 420 220.00-223.00 222.41
    5 485-490 488 211.00-219.00 216.81
    7 515-540 531 209.00-217.50 215.30


    Not to derail to far, but a large cow that ways over 700lb is only worth $202.49 on average? I cannot be reading that right.
  • fins4mefins4me Posts: 14,487 AG
    Not to derail to far, but a large cow that ways over 700lb is only worth $202.49 on average? I cannot be reading that right.

    per hundred weight.

    part of that did not come through,,, sorry.
    ALLISON XB 21,, MERCURY 300 Opti Max Pro Series (Slightly Modified) You can't catch me!!!
    "Today is MINE"
  • SWFL_F1sh0nSWFL_F1sh0n Posts: 17,248 Officer
    fins4me wrote: »
    per hundred weight.

    part of that did not come through,,, sorry.

    So roughly $200*7 = $1400 for a cow?
  • fins4mefins4me Posts: 14,487 AG
    So roughly $200*7 = $1400 for a cow?

    for that price yes.
    ALLISON XB 21,, MERCURY 300 Opti Max Pro Series (Slightly Modified) You can't catch me!!!
    "Today is MINE"
  • Conchy CrackerConchy Cracker Posts: 10,454 Officer
    How many bushels of that 6 dollar corn does a cow eat in it's life?
Sign In or Register to comment.