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Anyone routinely grind their own hamburger?

ParkerboyParkerboy Posts: 7,048 Admiral
I just ordered an attachment for the mixer for this purpose and wonder what you grind. I'm thinking Chuck or perhaps Round steak with bacon mixed in. There is a burger joint I go to.that has a burger called a "Squeaker" which is ground beef and bacon and is outstanding. I'm thinking 80/20 ground round v bacon. I have asked but they do not give out this info. I am planning to make bratwurst which I love also.

Any suggestions?

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Deo Vindice
«1

Replies

  • Lead slingerLead slinger Posts: 449 Officer
    Yup, it was how I justified buying the little woman buy a mixer...I could slap that attachment on there and go HAM on some pork burgers. I doubt you'll need that much bacon, but then again I've never walked past a piece of bacon I din't want to eat.
  • Hickory DogHickory Dog Posts: 5,047 Admiral
    I grind venison, beef and pork pretty regularly - partially frozen meat is easier to work/grind. I think you are little heavy on the bacon - if I am adding pork fat to venison I shoot for 10%, but that is just a guess. I don't weigh anything.

    The collagen casings are easy to work with but I peel them off before eating. I haven't tried natural casings yet but I will be this fall when we do our pig.

    Do you want to make American style brats or German white Bratwurst?
  • Machine HeadMachine Head Posts: 2,634 Officer
    True German white is made from veal
    "There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats." - Kenneth Grahame
  • ParkerboyParkerboy Posts: 7,048 Admiral
    True German brats. BTW, I have used natural casing in the past and they are the only way to go in my opinion.

    Sent from my KFJWA using Tapatalk
    Deo Vindice
  • Hickory DogHickory Dog Posts: 5,047 Admiral
    I will be making my own casings this fall - should be interesting.
  • AC ManAC Man Posts: 6,357 Admiral
    Parkerboy

    I was going to try this http://parade.condenast.com/24997/donnaelick/10-gourmet-burgers-that-will-rock-your-summer-grilling/ (scroll down to the 50/50 beef bacon burger) on Memorial Day but chickened out, had too many people to try it for the first time.
  • HOME DEPOT GEORGEHOME DEPOT GEORGE Posts: 653 Officer
    I prefer to get mine from the store with the maximum allowable amount of insect parts. :grin:grin:grin
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Mackeral SnatcherMackeral Snatcher Posts: 11,619 AG
    My BIL has a deli over in Coco Beach and does the a hamburger/ bacon mix burger that is awesome.
    I never asked the specifics.

    But they are real good.
    THERE SHOULD BE NO COMMERCIAL FISHING ALLOWED FOR ANY SPECIES THAT IS CONSIDERED OVERFISHED.
  • AbelmanAbelman Posts: 1,853 Captain
    I use ground chuck. I either have the butcher do it or just use a food processor at home. Just chop it up a bit and use the pulse option. Got that one from an Alton Brown show years ago and it works great.
    "Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they made a difference. The Marines don't have that problem" Ronald Reagan 1985
  • JohnnyBanditJohnnyBandit Posts: 8,518 Admiral
    I could... I have an old commercial grinder about the size you see in a meat market. Table top model. But I mostly use it for grind deer bones, deer and beef hearts, etc.
  • GA FinGA Fin Posts: 8,956 Admiral
    I have a small electric grinder I process my deer with. I may have to try to grind some bacon burger up now. :grin
    Straight white male living a life of privilege and proud of it.


    "The greatest pleasure is to vanquish your enemies and chase them before you, to rob them of their wealth and see those dear to them bathed in tears, to ride their horses and clasp to your bosom their wives and daughters."
  • BartBart Posts: 41 Greenhorn
    We grind several deer a year....don't buy much commercial ground beef...
    If people saw what really goes into the store bought stuff----they would start grinding their own..tendons, lymph glands, slimy connective tissue....they grind it because one couldn't bear to eat it in its unground state.
  • nuevowavonuevowavo Posts: 6,822 Admin
    Parkerboy wrote: »
    Anyone routinely grind their own hamburger?

    I thought that was a euphemism.
    Federales, bring my baby back to me!
  • bullgatorbullgator Posts: 1,940 Officer
    Bart wrote: »
    If people saw what really goes into the store bought stuff----they would start grinding their own..tendons, lymph glands, slimy connective tissue....they grind it because one couldn't bear to eat it in its unground state.

    The stuff I grind doesn't even look like ground beef from the grocery. I like a blend of chuck, brisket, and sirloin.
  • BatchBatch Posts: 33 Greenhorn
    I Have a hand grinder and a vertical sausage stuffer.

    I prefer natural casings. Just run water through them when you rinse them. Put a little water in the casing and then hold up both ends and swish it around inside. This will get the casings nice and moist, making them easier to stretch and fill without ripping. Keep them soaking in water until the very last second.

    If you need fat for a recipe you can go to grocery store like Publix and ask the butcher. They through all the fat away in the morning. So, you can go ask anytime of the day and they'll leave them a note to put away how ever many pounds you need. Then you can just swing by and pick it up. They do not charge anything for it.
  • gerrysgerrys Posts: 738 Officer
    I grind 50/50 chuck and veal for my hamburgers.
  • Conchy CrackerConchy Cracker Posts: 10,454 Officer
    Do you cook a bacon burger well done or do you eat rare bacon?
  • ParkerboyParkerboy Posts: 7,048 Admiral
    Do you cook a bacon burger well done or do you eat rare bacon?

    I have only had it at place called Tookie's and they do not ask, it is done but very juicy and tasty due to the bacon. Some of the recipes I have seen on line call for cooking the bacon to the point just before crisp and then add bacon and grease to ground Chuck.

    Sent from my KFJWA using Tapatalk
    Deo Vindice
  • mbowersmbowers Posts: 496 Deckhand
    Batch wrote: »
    I Have a hand grinder and a vertical sausage stuffer.

    I prefer natural casings. Just run water through them when you rinse them. Put a little water in the casing and then hold up both ends and swish it around inside. This will get the casings nice and moist, making them easier to stretch and fill without ripping. Keep them soaking in water until the very last second.

    If you need fat for a recipe you can go to grocery store like Publix and ask the butcher. They through all the fat away in the morning. So, you can go ask anytime of the day and they'll leave them a note to put away how ever many pounds you need. Then you can just swing by and pick it up. They do not charge anything for it.

    I had previously picked up some free fat at Publix but I just tried that at a Publix in Jupiter and the butcher said everything is so lean when they get it now that there's no fat to trim. Winn Dixie has frozen pork fat for $1.79 / lb which is hard to justify when fresh shoulder is $1.49 / lb. Winn Dixie did have some bulk bacon ends for around $2.50 / lb which would probably be a great choice for the ground bacon.

    For beef I pick up a whole sirloin or whatever large cut and wet age it in the bag for 3-4 weeks before grinding or steaking: noticeably more tender and it's pretty easy to do that wet aging.

    I grind everything myself: chicken, turkey, pork, fish, liver and beef.

    Saw one cooking show where the chef roasts the fat after trimming from the sirloin in a skillet and then adds the roasted fat drippings back to the raw ground sirloin. I have roasted the fat and saved the drippings but have not yet got around to making burgers with it. Soon...
  • SLW210SLW210 Posts: 2,226 Captain
    Batch wrote: »
    I Have a hand grinder and a vertical sausage stuffer.

    That just doesn't sound right!
  • micci_manmicci_man Somewhere in FLPosts: 14,649 AG
    Grocery stores around here charge for fat now because so many people grind venison during the season. I grind my own but also make trail bologna, snack stix and summer sausage.

    Hickory- I'll bet you a dollar you will be buying natural casings after your first go at getting your own from a hog after the process is complete :grin pain in the ****.
    Common Sense can't be bought, taught or gifted, yet it is one of the few things in life that is free, and most refuse to even attempt to possess it. - Miguel Cervantes
  • GRSCGRSC Posts: 942 Officer
    Sure do..... 1/3 chuck, 1/3 short rib, 1/3 brisket
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • JohnnyBanditJohnnyBandit Posts: 8,518 Admiral
    Bart wrote: »
    We grind several deer a year....don't buy much commercial ground beef...
    If people saw what really goes into the store bought stuff----they would start grinding their own..tendons, lymph glands, slimy connective tissue....they grind it because one couldn't bear to eat it in its unground state.


    Wrong!!!!
  • JohnnyBanditJohnnyBandit Posts: 8,518 Admiral
    micci_man wrote: »
    Grocery stores around here charge for fat now because so many people grind venison during the season. I grind my own but also make trail bologna, snack stix and summer sausage.

    Hickory- I'll bet you a dollar you will be buying natural casings after your first go at getting your own from a hog after the process is complete :grin pain in the ****.
    Fat is not particularly cheap any more. Beef, Lamb, pork... It is also in high demand...

    Part of it is hunting.... But the packers over time have begun trimming the primals MUCH closer.. So now stores usually have enough fat for their grinds sausages, etc. The primals all increased in price because of the closer trim. And now the packers box up the fat and sell that too. Stores that do lots of grind blends etc have no choice but to buy fat.
  • jad1097jad1097 Posts: 9,611 Admiral
    Wrong!!!!

    70 Percent of Ground Beef at Supermarkets Contains ‘Pink Slime’

    Mar 7, 2012 7:52pm
    gty ground beef tk 120307 wblog 70 Percent of Ground Beef at Supermarkets Contains Pink Slime

    Image Credit: Brian Yarvin/Getty Images

    Gerald Zirnstein grinds his own hamburger these days. Why? Because this former United States Department of Agriculture scientist and, now, whistleblower, knows that 70 percent of the ground beef we buy at the supermarket contains something he calls “pink slime.”

    “Pink slime” is beef trimmings. Once only used in dog food and cooking oil, the trimmings are now sprayed with ammonia so they are safe to eat and added to most ground beef as a cheaper filler.

    It was Zirnstein who, in an USDA memo, first coined the term “pink slime” and is now coming forward to say he won’t buy it.

    “It’s economic fraud,” he told ABC News. “It’s not fresh ground beef. … It’s a cheap substitute being added in.”

    Zirnstein and his fellow USDA scientist, Carl Custer, both warned against using what the industry calls “lean finely textured beef,” widely known now as “pink slime,” but their government bosses overruled them.

    If you have questions about “pink slime,” email us at [email protected].

    According to Custer, the product is not really beef, but “a salvage product … fat that had been heated at a low temperature and the excess fat spun out.”

    The “pink slime” is made by gathering waste trimmings, simmering them at low heat so the fat separates easily from the muscle, and spinning the trimmings using a centrifuge to complete the separation. Next, the mixture is sent through pipes where it is sprayed with ammonia gas to kill bacteria. The process is completed by packaging the meat into bricks. Then, it is frozen and shipped to grocery stores and meat packers, where it is added to most ground beef.

    The “pink slime” does not have to appear on the label because, over objections of its own scientists, USDA officials with links to the beef industry labeled it meat.

    “The under secretary said, ‘it’s pink, therefore it’s meat,’” Custer told ABC News.

    ABC News has learned the woman who made the decision to OK the mix is a former undersecretary of agriculture, Joann Smith. It was a call that led to hundred of millions of dollars for Beef Products Inc., the makers of pink slime.

    When Smith stepped down from the USDA in 1993, BPI’s principal major supplier appointed her to its board of directors, where she made at least $1.2 million over 17 years.

    Smith did not return ABC News’ calls for comment and BPI said it had nothing to do with her appointment. The USDA said while her appointment was legal at the time, under current ethics rules Smith could not have immediately joined the board.





    http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2012/03/70-percent-of-ground-beef-at-supermarkets-contains-pink-slime/
  • JohnnyBanditJohnnyBandit Posts: 8,518 Admiral
    jad1097 wrote: »
    70 Percent of Ground Beef at Supermarkets Contains ‘Pink Slime’

    Mar 7, 2012 7:52pm
    gty ground beef tk 120307 wblog 70 Percent of Ground Beef at Supermarkets Contains Pink Slime

    Image Credit: Brian Yarvin/Getty Images

    Gerald Zirnstein grinds his own hamburger these days. Why? Because this former United States Department of Agriculture scientist and, now, whistleblower, knows that 70 percent of the ground beef we buy at the supermarket contains something he calls “pink slime.”

    “Pink slime” is beef trimmings. Once only used in dog food and cooking oil, the trimmings are now sprayed with ammonia so they are safe to eat and added to most ground beef as a cheaper filler.

    It was Zirnstein who, in an USDA memo, first coined the term “pink slime” and is now coming forward to say he won’t buy it.

    “It’s economic fraud,” he told ABC News. “It’s not fresh ground beef. … It’s a cheap substitute being added in.”

    Zirnstein and his fellow USDA scientist, Carl Custer, both warned against using what the industry calls “lean finely textured beef,” widely known now as “pink slime,” but their government bosses overruled them.

    If you have questions about “pink slime,” email us at [email protected].

    According to Custer, the product is not really beef, but “a salvage product … fat that had been heated at a low temperature and the excess fat spun out.”

    The “pink slime” is made by gathering waste trimmings, simmering them at low heat so the fat separates easily from the muscle, and spinning the trimmings using a centrifuge to complete the separation. Next, the mixture is sent through pipes where it is sprayed with ammonia gas to kill bacteria. The process is completed by packaging the meat into bricks. Then, it is frozen and shipped to grocery stores and meat packers, where it is added to most ground beef.

    The “pink slime” does not have to appear on the label because, over objections of its own scientists, USDA officials with links to the beef industry labeled it meat.

    “The under secretary said, ‘it’s pink, therefore it’s meat,’” Custer told ABC News.

    ABC News has learned the woman who made the decision to OK the mix is a former undersecretary of agriculture, Joann Smith. It was a call that led to hundred of millions of dollars for Beef Products Inc., the makers of pink slime.

    When Smith stepped down from the USDA in 1993, BPI’s principal major supplier appointed her to its board of directors, where she made at least $1.2 million over 17 years.

    Smith did not return ABC News’ calls for comment and BPI said it had nothing to do with her appointment. The USDA said while her appointment was legal at the time, under current ethics rules Smith could not have immediately joined the board.





    http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2012/03/70-percent-of-ground-beef-at-supermarkets-contains-pink-slime/

    Pink slime is a myth.... a grocery store cannot buy it. Cannot be done... The guy cited was a whistle blower with sour grapes and an agenda.

    Grocery stores get their grinds one of two ways.

    They buy chuck rolls or chuck clods, round, sirloin, etc and grind it themselves for whatever blend they are selling. If it is labeled ground chuck it has to be made from muscle meat from the shoulder. Ground Round has to be made from muscle meat of the round. Same thing for sirloin. Blends that are called Market grind, hamburger, etc. Can be made from any beef trimmings the market has. Or the store can buy trimmings, or boneless shank meat, head or cheek trimmings (the muscle meat on the heat)

    OR....

    they can buy it pre ground and stuff in tubes from the packer. The tubes can be retail labeled where the store just sticks are price on it. Or MORE common, 10 pound clear plastic tubes that the store cuts open and repackages it. Most often it is re ground. it causes it to "bloom" and turn red...

    Either way, there are regulations at both the federal and state level and often local as well. With eyes on in all cases and steep fines for non compliance.


    There are no tendons in hamburger. Tendons are pulled out at the packer. they are HIGHLY sought after and highly valuable. Close to twice as valuable as any part of the cattle ground beef is made from.....

    We have NEVER have enough tendons for sale. The domestic market on tendons fights with the Asian export market. The packers never send us what we order and we have strict allotments per sales rep. I could sell 3 times as many cases a week as I have alloted to me.
    And the packers also mark the cases sold for the domestic market, NOT FOR EXPORT... So wholesalers like ourselves, especially one in states with large sea ports and have relationships with exporters and regularly sell to exporters, CANNOT sell tendons for export. IT will not go through.
  • jad1097jad1097 Posts: 9,611 Admiral
    Pink slime is a myth.... a grocery store cannot buy it. Cannot be done



    :huh








    Derided beef product once referred to as ‘pink slime’ making a comeback

    The ‘pink slime’ saga continues

    In Defense of Pink Slime









    http://www.azfamily.com/news/local/USDA-defends-pink-slime-144515095.html
    PHOENIX -- For the first time, U.S. government officials are addressing concerns over so-called "pink slime," a filler commonly added to ground beef.

    "There's a firestorm with people misunderstanding the situation," said Kathleen Merrigan, the Department of Agriculture's Deputy Secretary.

    "We are 100 percent behind the safety of this product. No question about it," she said in an interview at the Thunderbird School of Global Management in Phoenix.

    It marks the first comment from a USDA official on the controversy, which started growing several weeks ago. Consumers and watchdog groups voiced concern over the "pink slime" additive, which is essentially scrap meat pieces compressed together and treated with an antibacterial agent.

    The USDA and meat industry refer to the filler product as "finely-textured beef." It's been added to ground beef products for years and is USDA approved.

    "We would not be providing this product to schools if we thought it was unsafe, clearly," Merrigan said. She says it's a lean product that helps lower the fat content of ground beef.

    Still, the USDA will now give school districts it provides with beef the option of choosing beef without the filler product.

    Merrigan, who says she serves ground beef with the filler at her home and allows her daughter to eat it at school without concern, says the USDA will not re-examine the product.

    "Absolutely not," she said. "It's safe."


    http://news.yahoo.com/usda-defends-decision-pink-slime-school-lunches-182400391.html

    USDA Defends Decision to Include 'Pink Slime' in School Lunches

    The Department of Agriculture has been left scrambling to defend its intentions to buy some 7 million pounds of the beef trimmings known as "pink slime" for use in school lunches. The agency has reiterated to media outlets, including The Daily, that all food products purchased for use in the National School Lunch Program "must meet the highest standards for food safety," as quoted by USA Today.

    What is pink slime?

    Pink slime, also known by the slightly more appetizing sounding "boneless lean beef trimmings," is a beef byproduct. It includes many parts of the cow that are not used in other capacities, including the intestines and connective tissues. Because these are typically more easily tainted by E. coli and salmonella, the product is washed with a solution of ammonium hydroxide to sterilize it.

    Is it safe to eat?

    According to the USDA, yes, particularly because of the ammonia wash that the product goes through to kill bacteria. The Los Angeles Times referenced the head of the American Meat Institute, J. Patrick Boyle, who has also claimed the product is safe to eat and has maintained that not using these parts of the cattle would allow "lean, nutritious, safe beef" to be wasted.

    Others are not convinced. McDonald's, Taco Bell and Burger King announced earlier this month they were going to discontinue using the product in their food. The U.K. has banned it for human consumption.

    How did the media found out about the product?

    Two former USDA scientists have publicly decried the use of pink slime, according to the New York Times. Carl S. Custer and Gerald Zernstein have at turns called the product "a cheap substitute" and "not nutritionally equivalent," to regular beef.

    Will the USDA back down?

    It remains to be seen. As MSNBC has pointed out, there are several online petitions calling for the USDA to change its course, but the agency is sticking to its plans, and on Monday it released another statement attesting to the product's safety.

    Under federal law, the USDA is not required to distinguish between products that may or may not have pink slime included in its ingredients. Manufacturers are not required to put ammonia on a food label's list of ingredients either.
  • JohnnyBanditJohnnyBandit Posts: 8,518 Admiral
    jad1097 wrote: »
    :huh


    We were talking retail stores...








    Derided beef product once referred to as ‘pink slime’ making a comeback

    The ‘pink slime’ saga continues

    In Defense of Pink Slime









    http://www.azfamily.com/news/local/USDA-defends-pink-slime-144515095.html
    PHOENIX -- For the first time, U.S. government officials are addressing concerns over so-called "pink slime," a filler commonly added to ground beef.

    "There's a firestorm with people misunderstanding the situation," said Kathleen Merrigan, the Department of Agriculture's Deputy Secretary.

    "We are 100 percent behind the safety of this product. No question about it," she said in an interview at the Thunderbird School of Global Management in Phoenix.

    It marks the first comment from a USDA official on the controversy, which started growing several weeks ago. Consumers and watchdog groups voiced concern over the "pink slime" additive, which is essentially scrap meat pieces compressed together and treated with an antibacterial agent.

    The USDA and meat industry refer to the filler product as "finely-textured beef." It's been added to ground beef products for years and is USDA approved.

    "We would not be providing this product to schools if we thought it was unsafe, clearly," Merrigan said. She says it's a lean product that helps lower the fat content of ground beef.

    Still, the USDA will now give school districts it provides with beef the option of choosing beef without the filler product.

    Merrigan, who says she serves ground beef with the filler at her home and allows her daughter to eat it at school without concern, says the USDA will not re-examine the product.

    "Absolutely not," she said. "It's safe."


    http://news.yahoo.com/usda-defends-decision-pink-slime-school-lunches-182400391.html

    USDA Defends Decision to Include 'Pink Slime' in School Lunches

    The Department of Agriculture has been left scrambling to defend its intentions to buy some 7 million pounds of the beef trimmings known as "pink slime" for use in school lunches. The agency has reiterated to media outlets, including The Daily, that all food products purchased for use in the National School Lunch Program "must meet the highest standards for food safety," as quoted by USA Today.

    What is pink slime?

    Pink slime, also known by the slightly more appetizing sounding "boneless lean beef trimmings," is a beef byproduct. It includes many parts of the cow that are not used in other capacities, including the intestines and connective tissues. Because these are typically more easily tainted by E. coli and salmonella, the product is washed with a solution of ammonium hydroxide to sterilize it.

    Is it safe to eat?

    According to the USDA, yes, particularly because of the ammonia wash that the product goes through to kill bacteria. The Los Angeles Times referenced the head of the American Meat Institute, J. Patrick Boyle, who has also claimed the product is safe to eat and has maintained that not using these parts of the cattle would allow "lean, nutritious, safe beef" to be wasted.

    Others are not convinced. McDonald's, Taco Bell and Burger King announced earlier this month they were going to discontinue using the product in their food. The U.K. has banned it for human consumption.

    How did the media found out about the product?

    Two former USDA scientists have publicly decried the use of pink slime, according to the New York Times. Carl S. Custer and Gerald Zernstein have at turns called the product "a cheap substitute" and "not nutritionally equivalent," to regular beef.

    Will the USDA back down?

    It remains to be seen. As MSNBC has pointed out, there are several online petitions calling for the USDA to change its course, but the agency is sticking to its plans, and on Monday it released another statement attesting to the product's safety.

    Under federal law, the USDA is not required to distinguish between products that may or may not have pink slime included in its ingredients. Manufacturers are not required to put ammonia on a food label's list of ingredients either.


    We were talking retail stores...

    Pink slime is a term the media came up with. there is no such product in the industry. Never has been.

    Further processors such as patty, meatball, etc makers often use products in their lower end further products
    Soy, buildup and byproduct (not organs, glands, etc all that stuff is FAR too valuable) from processing, etc.
    Some of the pre made patties are really low end.And the rules are different for them. They have to meet safety guidelines but....
    Institutional products for schools, jails, prisons etc. and prepackaged often pre cooked products for convenience stores, etc.

    And the problem in kids, old people, etc getting that crap does not lie with the further processors or the USDA allowing it. It really boils down to being the public's fault. Government run organizations and government subsidized organizations have budgets. They also have nutritional requirements they must fulfill for the people they are feeding.

    So these organizations set the prices at times or send it out to the cheapest bidder.
    The list will read something like this.
    4 oz ground beef patties. Must contain x grams of protein, x grams of fat etc. unit cost cannot be more than .29 per patty.

    So then the people that are selling products to these places are forced to figure out how to provide a patty that meets the nutritional requirement and the price point AND make a profit. All sorts of things have been used over the years.

    The problem lies in that they only have so much money to feed X number of people at a designated nutritional level.

    Other than people that buy burgers and such at convenience stores, nobody with a choice will that crap.

    Now back to the original statement.
    We grind several deer a year....don't buy much commercial ground beef...
    If people saw what really goes into the store bought stuff----they would start grinding their own..tendons, lymph glands, slimy connective tissue....they grind it because one couldn't bear to eat it in its unground state.



    To which I still say.... Wrong...

    Pink Slime is a name that the media came up with... No such product with that name exists in the industry.

    And any filler product someone may call such a name is NOT available to a retail establishment. And a retailer would NOT use it if it was unless he wanted to be out of business.

    As for tendons, glands, cartilage, etc is FAR too valuable to be used in ground beef even if it could be.
  • BatchBatch Posts: 33 Greenhorn
    mbowers wrote: »
    I had previously picked up some free fat at Publix but I just tried that at a Publix in Jupiter and the butcher said everything is so lean when they get it now that there's no fat to trim. Winn Dixie has frozen pork fat for $1.79 / lb which is hard to justify when fresh shoulder is $1.49 / lb. Winn Dixie did have some bulk bacon ends for around $2.50 / lb which would probably be a great choice for the ground bacon.


    I just picked up fat from the Publix on Wiles Road and Coral Springs Drive in Coral Springs in March. Guy said I could have all I needed because they throw it out. I was in Broward Meats just before that and they said that the only thing they had was pork belly fat. I think that was like $1.99 a pound.
  • mitchellmastermitchellmaster Posts: 363 Officer
    I just buy a whole striploin for 3.99 lb average 50 - 55.oo and make 8 steaks and they take the rest and some of the trimmings and make ground.
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