Seeing Red(s)--5/28 IRL

With a forecast of 2 mph winds in the early AM I was lagoon bound at dark:30 this morning. The usual launching procedures went off without a hitch, and at 6 sharp I was poling onto the first intended fishing grounds of the day. As I was making my way through the first bits of grey light I started to hear the sounds of fish feeding frantically off in the darkness. I started covering ground with a bit of haste and as the sun started to peek over the horizon I located the source of the frenzied sounds. An enormous school of reds was cruising the flat in the low light hours, terrorizing any mullet they happened upon. The fish numbered in the hundreds...and just selecting a target was challenge enough. Admittedly I just cast into the head of the pack, betting on the sheer numbers of fish, one of them would find it. And one did, after a solid 7min fight I wrestled this 33" hefty goon drum into the boat. Apologies of the picture quality, go pros struggle in low light.
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After a good long recovery she kicked off back towards the school, which had settled down just 30 yds away and was happily swimming about. That was fun, let's do it again....

Another whip of the CAL and before I could even close the bail, another red pounced.
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This one was in slot, but I opted to see her swim away, in hopes the fishing gods would see another to my jig. Which they kindly obliged.

For the next 3 hours I followed school after school of countless reds along the lagoon. Some groups were more willing to eat than others and I certainly was dealt my share of rejections. But I managed to boat a total of 13 reds through out the morning. The water was clear, the winds were calm, and (most of) the fish were hungry.
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And although I was granted ample opportunities, I was once again snubbed on the fly rod. I had one fish take but I missed the hook set. Oh well there's always another day of fishing.

It was an excellent day on the lagoon, and I was fortunate to have the conditions I did. Here's to the weather man, who actually got it right (this time)....:applause

Thanks for reading.
Tight Lines!

Replies

  • leel33mlleel33ml Posts: 144 Deckhand
    Props for sure looks like you had a killer day! I would kill to have a day like that soon!

    How were you moving the boat around? Trolling motor? I typically fish the west coast. When I came over to your side the reds spooked up with I turned on my TM.
  • FowlMouth824FowlMouth824 Posts: 367 Deckhand
    leel33ml wrote: »
    Props for sure looks like you had a killer day! I would kill to have a day like that soon!

    How were you moving the boat around? Trolling motor? I typically fish the west coast. When I came over to your side the reds spooked up with I turned on my TM.

    I use a 17ft push pole when cruising the very shallow flats. Where I'm at the grass is so thick a troller is next to useless. These east coast reds get a lot of pressure, and they spook very easily at the whirring of a tm.
  • leel33mlleel33ml Posts: 144 Deckhand
    Ah yeah that's what I expected. . That's one great thing about the west coast! Less pressure for sure. . I can bang up on some Oyster bars, run the TM and still catch the reds.
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