Need advice buying a boat

ProYakProYak Posts: 297 Officer
Just sold my Hobie Adventure Island that carried me safely out a couple miles beyond Hillsboro Inlet, FL into about 150-300 depths in 2'-5' seas with 10-15 mph winds. Unfortunately the lengthy setup/teardown launching times (an hour minimum) with hakas that held a Minn Kota RT55/St/IP and Scotty electric down-rigger, was too tedious in our 90 degree Florida sun. I need a small boat that can handle that same conditions, and accept my Minn Kota and Scotty!

Because of my age, I need an easy to launch boat & trailer, that runs on the smell of an oily rag, that I can store inside my 18' carport.

I only have $5000

What hull design and reliable & fuel-efficient outboard combo would you suggest?

I do not want or need to go anywhere fast, I just need enough power to buck the outgoing tide thru the inlet that often runs @ 5 knots.

Thanks!

IMG_20140523_101739_zps7a2c2b81.jpg
"Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after." ~ Henry David Thoreau

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Replies

  • rngrileyrngriley Posts: 344 Deckhand
    A Boston whaler or mako would work, just have to pick your days.
  • CameronCameron Posts: 208 Deckhand
    The old Boston Whaler's might be up for the task but they won't get out there without a little rough riding. I suppose a Gheenoe could do it as well but not a big jump up from your kayak. Otherwise you are probably looking at spending a bit more and moving up or picking up an older project boat.
  • ProYakProYak Posts: 297 Officer
    rngriley wrote: »
    A Boston whaler or mako would work, just have to pick your days.

    Yes I like the BW hull, and I always pick my days and nights!
    "Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after." ~ Henry David Thoreau

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  • ProYakProYak Posts: 297 Officer
    Gentlemen,
    I don't really want or need a big motor that most of these 17-18 footers come with - any ideas where I can buy just a hull, and put on smaller motor of my choice?!
    "Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after." ~ Henry David Thoreau

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  • CameronCameron Posts: 208 Deckhand
    Unlike a kayak which has a very narrow beam and is very light, most boats need a certain amount of power to push them through waves. If you were flats fishing, you would have options galore such as a small motor on a jon boat. However going offshore particularly in 2'+ seas generally requires something a bit sturdier and something that can handle getting swamped. As I noted, the Gheenoe is a possible solution but not really built for offshore angling. Another possible idea is a PWC. I have seen one of these rigged for fishing up close and it was impressive.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HPfQDyvnDp0
  • ProYakProYak Posts: 297 Officer
    Thanks again Cameron - the PWC is a very interesting solution - great vid link! Gheenoe is unthinkable and very sinkable!!!
    "Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after." ~ Henry David Thoreau

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  • JizzoJizzo Posts: 1,362 Officer
    *not my boat.. .

    http://www.thehulltruth.com/boats-sale-wanted/590071-1999-sailfish-154-w-yamaha-f50-5550-a.html

    I've been daydreaming about this one. Looks seaworthy, well built and the 4 stroke 50 will sip gas.

    Still, it's a small boat but it will get you there and back on decent days.
    -Jon
  • Kevinwwings2Kevinwwings2 Posts: 1,273 Officer
    All good advice. On the motor, I would rather have a larger motor and not use it all then have an under powered boat and always be pushing the motor too hard. It will last longer that way and is actually more efficient. Too much power is not a bad thing in a boat, it just requires self control.
    I would watch for something like the ones posted above. Great for inshore, and good for off-shore when you pick your days. Very easy to operate by yourself, but yet room for others. I would think you should have no problem finding something within your budget if your patient. Don't just go buy something, put some time into research and be sure you have the engine looked at by a mechanic. You don't want to have to buy another motor soon after purchasing a boat.
    Good luck.
  • ProYakProYak Posts: 297 Officer
    Kevin - all good advice - thanks!
    "Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after." ~ Henry David Thoreau

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  • ProYakProYak Posts: 297 Officer
    Saw this ad from Port St Lucie

    "17.5 Mckee craft new bimini last year, removable igloo cooler seat, 27 gallon livewell in hull, ..., motor runs but lower right cynd bad compression needs repair or replace can start it if u want, trailer good have title 2500 obo"


    I thought I could sell the motor for parts as it may be too costly to fix, and put on a new 25 hp Tohatsu 4-stroke as I mostly troll and don't need to go far or fast - thoughts?!
    "Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after." ~ Henry David Thoreau

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • talleyman01talleyman01 Posts: 76 Greenhorn
    When it comes to a boat you gotta fig out what you want or need out of it first and foremost cause if your very picky about days then theres no reason you couldn't run a j16 skiff you can buy them brand new with nothing in them and design them to your liking or even the dlv 16 which is their semi v theres are tons of options out there have you looked into any of the smaller alum boats? sea ark makes a ton and are very light and simple to handle?
  • CameronCameron Posts: 208 Deckhand
    ProYak wrote: »
    Saw this ad from Port St Lucie

    "17.5 Mckee craft new bimini last year, removable igloo cooler seat, 27 gallon livewell in hull, ..., motor runs but lower right cynd bad compression needs repair or replace can start it if u want, trailer good have title 2500 obo"


    I thought I could sell the motor for parts as it may be too costly to fix, and put on a new 25 hp Tohatsu 4-stroke as I mostly troll and don't need to go far or fast - thoughts?!

    Mckee Crafts are much like the Whalers as in they are really solid boats. While they may not be unsinkable if you are going to take something under 18' offshore, they would top my list of boats to go with. I probably wouldn't be comfortable using a 25hp on a boat that size nearshore but since I have never tried it I cannot say it won't work.

    As someone pointed out engine size has more to do with how well a motor in its sweet spot pushes a boat. Most engines do not last long when pushed and I am guessing a 25hp with that weight hull in 2'+ seas is going to be asking a lot. This is just an educated guess, a boat this size probably does best with a 90hp or something in that neighborhood.
  • JizzoJizzo Posts: 1,362 Officer
    I don't think that motor on a boat that size would be safe going out of any inlet. I might be OK for the creeks. Inlets get nasty quick. It might be nice when you leave in the morning but tides and wind change. 5 or 6 hours later might not be the same. You might not get back with that setup. I think that would be unsafe nearshore. just my .02
    -Jon
  • ProYakProYak Posts: 297 Officer
    Thanks guys, you're giving good advice and I'm taking it all onboard!
    "Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after." ~ Henry David Thoreau

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  • ProYakProYak Posts: 297 Officer
    Here's a couple boats that I found - thoughts?!

    2000 Sailfish 188 cc Yamaha 4 stroke 100 HP
    http://miami.craigslist.org/pbc/clt/4482843071.html

    97 17ft Cobia cc with 80 Yamaha
    http://fortmyers.craigslist.org/col/boa/4427825941.html
    "Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after." ~ Henry David Thoreau

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • CameronCameron Posts: 208 Deckhand
    Both are probably going to have some wood in their hulls and the motors may be long in the tooth. A survey would certainly be on my list. If I were to pick, the Sailfish would top my list. Sailfish hulls are known to cut through waves very well and have a mostly solid reputation. Cobia boats from that era have a pretty hit or miss reputation. Again it depends on the survey though.
  • Jim311Jim311 Posts: 4,936 Captain
    I'm betting a Gheenoe can do anything you did in your kayak, only with the added benefit of being able to much more quickly come and go and run from storms. Look into the "Classic" and LT25 models, they are not unstable and are surprisingly capable. Mine has been 3-5 nautical miles out and it's no sweat, but pick your days. A 2 foot chop isn't too big of a deal in one either, although it isn't going to be a dry ride. You might also consider a jon boat or similar aluminum craft. I'm a big fan of doing more with less, and a believer in the saying that big boats are more likely to stay in the driveway.
  • cprcpr Posts: 9,309 Admiral
    x2 post
    "The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function." F. Scott Fitzgerald

    "Prediction is very difficult, especially if it's about the future." Niels Bohr
  • cprcpr Posts: 9,309 Admiral
    ProYak wrote: »
    Here's a couple boats that I found - thoughts?!

    2000 Sailfish 188 cc Yamaha 4 stroke 100 HP
    http://miami.craigslist.org/pbc/clt/4482843071.html

    97 17ft Cobia cc with 80 Yamaha
    http://fortmyers.craigslist.org/col/boa/4427825941.html


    I think the 97 is way over priced. 4000 tops

    Just make sure you have tow insurance, a good anchor and plenty of line, a VHF and a PLB. Old engines and wiring systems can be finicky. I had an older 18 foot boat and engine and it was great for inshore and lakes. It worked well off shore out to 12 miles, but a few times it took a while to crank, the lights would go on and off on their own and I needed to be towed once because the engine wouldn't start. I lost confidence in that boat and now just a yak and shore fisherman.

    PS. I really don't miss paying taxes, insurance, and upkeep on a boat. I'll rent when I need one.
    "The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function." F. Scott Fitzgerald

    "Prediction is very difficult, especially if it's about the future." Niels Bohr
  • ProYakProYak Posts: 297 Officer
    For a lot of trolling, which would be better a 4-stroke or 2...
    "Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after." ~ Henry David Thoreau

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  • snookmansnookman Posts: 226 Deckhand
  • lifegoesonlifegoeson Posts: 338 Deckhand
    4-stroke would be better, but I would not make that a deal breaker.

    If you make a list of what you want and add a point system to it, with the higher points for things you feel are higher on the list it can make looking at boats easier and makes comparing them really easy.

    From the sounds of it you might want to look into an aluminum boat, much cheaper and run fine with smaller motors.
  • ProYakProYak Posts: 297 Officer
    snookman wrote: »
    don't do it.

    Snookman, what are you referring to?!
    "Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after." ~ Henry David Thoreau

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  • 724x4724x4 Posts: 38 Deckhand
    I agree with renting a bigger boat when needed completely.
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