Hobie vs Malibu

dcrdcr Posts: 335 Deckhand
Anybody have any general comments or experience with either a Hobie Mirage Sport 9' vs. Malibu Stealth 9?
Thanks!

Replies

  • jcanracerjcanracer Posts: 4,321 Moderator
    I had the Hobie sport and I loved it. I originally had a storage problem, so I had to get a kayak that would fit in a 5x10 public storage unit and the Hobie Sport fit the bill quite nicely. My 2012 model was great offshore and inshore. The 2014 Sport is actually vastly improved over the one I had (link to my old one below) as the new one has a redesigned hull, forward hatch, and now has a dedicated transducer mount for Lowrance units.
    http://forums.floridasportsman.com/showthread.php?28090-Jcanracer-s-Hobie-Sport
    http://www.hobiecat.com/mirage/mirage-sport/
    I might even buy a new Sport later this year.

    I can't comment on the Malibu as I have not paddled it and refuse to make a blanket statement about their products in ignorance. To its credit though, the Malibu has a whole lot more weight capacity for the equivalent vessel length.
    http://www.malibukayaks.com/stealth-9-fish-dive.html
    Hobie Kayak angler for life!
  • dcrdcr Posts: 335 Deckhand
    jcanracer wrote: »
    To its credit though, the Malibu has a whole lot more weight capacity for the equivalent vessel length.
    And the Hobie weighs 50% more. This is an issue for me since I'm an old guy with tendonitis, which is also a reason to be paddling with my legs instead of my arms. I am right on, or a little over, the capacity since I weigh 205. Do you see a problem if I load it an extra 5-10# ? I'm not fishing in the surf.

    Thanks for the comments, exactly what I was looking for.
    Anyone else?
  • jcanracerjcanracer Posts: 4,321 Moderator
    The sport is 55 lbs and easy enough to carry not to mention that for the 2014 model they added symmetrical handles on either side. If you are not going far offshore and not loading yourself down with a live well or 20+lbs of gear then the Sport will be great.
    Now if you want to stand, well the stealth 9 looks more suitable for that task.
    Hobie Kayak angler for life!
  • Android77Android77 Posts: 483 Deckhand
    9 foot kayaks are not very good for much of anything except to say I have a kayak. At 205 your just asking for trouble. A Hobie outback would be a lot more suitable for you and any paddle kayak shorter than 14 feet will make you look like a drunk driver trying to paddle straight. Someone has a tarpon 140 for sale in the classified and if I didn't already have 3 I would have bought it the first day it was listed.
  • uno--masuno--mas Posts: 346 Officer
    from an 'old guy' myself, with multiple shoulder and elbow issue, i paddled for about 6 months and went with pedals. i could not have continued paddling and enjoyed myself.

    also, from an 'old guy', i would also recommend you think long about the length. stability can be paramount even in flat, calm water. i totally prefer as much length as possible. keep in mind, regardless of weight, unless you plan to carry it in top of your head for long distances, you are really never lifting the entire weight of a kayak. typically you are only lifting the bow or stern to load/unload and move the boat around. invest in the wheels to move it from the vehicle to the launch. yea, its an additional expense, but you will love yourself for having it.

    **my local dealer Orchid Island Bike and Kayak will be having their monthly demo day on February 8th. you can try before you buy and make sure you are happy with what the boats do, without being inside the shop and feeling rushed. you don't have to sign up for the demo day, but if you give them a call they can most likely arrange to have the model you are looking at, there at the demo so you can really kick the tires. they do the demo day in Vero Beach, right next to Barber Bridge. (772) 299-1286

    cheers
    drew
    Cathedra Mea, Regulae Meae.
  • Lt.FireDogLt.FireDog Posts: 1,112 Officer
    Piggy-backing on what Drew said, longer is going to be more efficient, and weight shouldn't be a deal breaker....if the Sport interests you, I would take a long, hard look at the Outback.

    Also, if your south of Vero Beach, South River Outfitters in Stuart offers Hobie demo's Wed-Sun....year-round.

    I have nothing to add regarding the Mini-X...good or bad.
  • ZimmerNoleZimmerNole Posts: 9,244 Officer
    I'm quoting this from another thread, my .02 on pedal vs paddle
    I guess I could chime in here...I had a Pompano 120 (2008 Tarpon 120 model) and I've gotta say ever since I switched up to a Hobie Outback I have NO IDEA why it took me so long to do so! Just the ability to grab a rod and pitch it at something is worth it the first time you do it. Live baiting with the hobie is a game changer....as I can just slowly paddle and let out line and control the rate of line going out. Opposed to stopping, pitching th bait, opening the bail, paddling, checking on it, trying to avoid a backlash on a conventional etc etc etc

    If you enjoy going offshore, and vertical jigging the very first day I was out on the Hobie I noticed an immediate difference....my arms weren't tired! After paddling all the way out to jiggin depths, that first drop would always stink as your shoulders may be a bit tense after the paddle (esp in rough surf!) EVEN more important? After jigging all day, I can use a different and much bigger muscle group (my legs) to get back to shore as opposed to relying solely on my upper body the entire day.

    +1 for being able to drink a beer and move at the same time, the "one handed paddle" while trying to drink a beer was annoying.
    +1 for being able to re-rig on the move, as opposed to stopping to tie a knot and drifting far off the spot.
    +1 for being able to quickly get back to a spot to drop a jig/deploy a bait instead of fighting the current the whole day
    +1 for being able to snap quick pictures while moving
    +1 for stability, the ability to sit side saddle more comfortably and relieve yourself off the kayak (i.e. take a leak)
    +1 for being able to chase a fish or pull a fish away from a wreck with the Hobie without having to put the rod down.

    Bottom line, if fishing is your main priority then a Hobie is the way to go! To me, a kayak is simply a means to a way of getting offshore without owning a boat. That being said, I'm not into kayaking for the health benefits....I'm a fisherman. It all comes down to priorities!

    As I look back, the only upside the paddle yak had over the Outback was the workout that I got, and the weight as the Pompano was super light!

    Read more: http://forums.floridasportsman.com/showthread.php?142460-ocean-kayak-trident-13-or-hobie-revolution-13#ixzz2rcHsmfJ2

    I've gone to "the dark side" and I'm never looking back. I just love the mirage drive, and I will try and steer people in that direction whenever possible. That being said, a friend of mine has a Malibu mini x for his son and it is a VERY stable kayak. I was even able to stand up in it (6'2 185lbs) without too much wobble.

    For a smaller yak, I was impressed. Then again, I'll never switch up to a paddle yak again if I don't have to! :wink
    Heroes On the Water
    South Florida Chapter Coordinator
    https://www.facebook.com/HOWSouthFloridaChapter

    "Helping find peace for those who fought to defend it!" :USA
    FREEDOM CAPTURED!

    FSU Alumni GO NOLES!!! >>
    >

    2013 Hobie Outback
  • jcanracerjcanracer Posts: 4,321 Moderator
    dcr, you said you are not going to be "fishing in the surf" so what is your intended fishing environment?

    I will stand by my recommendation for the Hobie Sport despite its limits in length and capacity. In my year of ownership, I took it inshore, near shore and offshore. Loki and Yakangler nicknamed my kayak "the bathtub" or "tub" for short because I looked a bit too big for the kayak, but the Tub and I kept up with everyone. And once I added those turbo fins I was even faster.

    Traditionally a kayak with a short overall length does not hold a straight course well and is less efficient in propulsion because it does not glide as well as a longer kayak. The rudder negates the first problem, and the mirage drive takes care of the second problem. Still sucks to paddle, but thats true of many Hobies. Naturally, a Revolution or Outback will still perform better at every task, but my point is that if your aim is a compact & lightweight kayak for fishing in/nearshore then don't be afraid to demo the 2014 Sport.

    Here's a vid from last year where I gave my dad a sport to use (and he is 5'10" 185lbs) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yIlaxOgd60
    Hobie Kayak angler for life!
  • dcrdcr Posts: 335 Deckhand
    I'm using this yak primarily in the reservoir 500 yds from my house for bass/walleye/panfish. It's pretty quiet out there with a 10hp limit, some skinny water, and stumps. I don't know yet how I'm transporting it, but have some options. You've sold me on the Hobie and I'm considering the Outback now, but still have to get past the extra 2.5' in transport, maneuverability, and weight. I guess it's time for a demo.
    Thanks everyone!
  • ZimmerNoleZimmerNole Posts: 9,244 Officer
    dcr wrote: »
    I'm using this yak primarily in the reservoir 500 yds from my house for bass/walleye/panfish. It's pretty quiet out there with a 10hp limit, some skinny water, and stumps. I don't know yet how I'm transporting it, but have some options. You've sold me on the Hobie and I'm considering the Outback now, but still have to get past the extra 2.5' in transport, maneuverability, and weight. I guess it's time for a demo.
    Thanks everyone!

    I bolded the most important part, demo, demo and demo some more. That is by far the best thing you can do.

    I love my Outback, and I car topped it onto an SUV for the past few months. A rubber backed bathmat placed on the rear window ($8 at walmart) is all you need to efficiently slide it up onto the roof with minimal effort. If you get a decent kayak cart the Outback loads very easily into/out of a pickup truck bed.

    The extra 2.5 for me is totally worth the stability in big waves (not really an issue for you), stand ability (I can easily stand in calm water on mine, but I have decent balance) and STORAGE. I've never demoed a Hobie Sport, but at 6'2 the idea of a 9ft yak just does not cross my mind much.

    What is the difference in weight? Just curious. It's easily negated by a quality kayak kart :wink

    FYI, I use Malone Seawings on op of my SUV with the included rachet straps, works very well.
    Heroes On the Water
    South Florida Chapter Coordinator
    https://www.facebook.com/HOWSouthFloridaChapter

    "Helping find peace for those who fought to defend it!" :USA
    FREEDOM CAPTURED!

    FSU Alumni GO NOLES!!! >>
    >

    2013 Hobie Outback
  • dcrdcr Posts: 335 Deckhand
    I get varying weights depending on the website. I think Hobie weighs the hull only.
    Malibu 9 is about 43#, Hobie Sport 9 about 66#, and the Outback about 88#.
    Yes, storage is an issue. The only thing I've figured out is hanging from my garage ceiling. 9' vs 12' is a slight issue there. Hoisting up an extra 20# to the ceiling is too. Thanks for the tips on loading it.
  • Lt.FireDogLt.FireDog Posts: 1,112 Officer
    "I get varying weights depending on the website. I think Hobie weighs the hull only.
    Malibu 9 is about 43#, Hobie Sport 9 about 66#, and the Outback about 88#."


    FYI-

    ~Hobie Sport weighs in at 54.5 lbs "Fitted" (everything that is attached to hull). Fully rigged, it is 68 lbs (seat, Mirage Drive, paddle, storage bucket, water bottle, ect).

    ~Outback is 75lbs, Fitted and 88.3 lbs, Fully Rigged.
  • jcanracerjcanracer Posts: 4,321 Moderator
    See above for explanation of fitted versus fully rigged. This is why I said you're really only carrying 55lbs when you're holding it over your head putting it on your roof rack. Typically then you would set it down on the scupper cart :wink, load it up with all your gear and wheel yourself to your launch point. Once there you can take the wheels with you or put them back in your car (I do).
    Hobie Kayak angler for life!
  • MakoLogicMakoLogic Posts: 627 Officer
    I just got a '13 Outback this fall, and honestly can't say enough about the Mirage Drive. If you are going to fish it will double your fishing time and you will fish totally differently. I can work around docks, in and out of bridge pilings in the running tide etc while fishing and casting. Just can't do that with a paddle kayak. With your size, I would recommend the extra length and stability of the Outback. I'm 6'2" 215 and don't think I'd be comfortable in a shorter yak. Oh and unless you are much more acrobatic than I am, standing and fishing in the outback is really not an option, I'm sure the Sport is even squirrelier. I tried it one time and just about went in the drink while casting. Won't be doing that one again.
    Fisherman, outdoors enthusiast, and software geek (not necessarily in that order, depending on the day)
    www.makologic.com
    [email protected]

    Formerly TxToFl...
Sign In or Register to comment.