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When to use certain lures

DragScreamerDragScreamer Posts: 1,475 Officer
ok so i do alot of bass fishing and you have to know how to use the conditions to tell what lure, color, and size to use. Now ive only done most of my inshore fishing in NY long island when i was 6-11 so i have no idea what to do inshore hear lol.....so my question is when is the best time to use a:

spoon
crankbait
curly tail grubs
jerkbaits
jigs
popping corks
shrimps
swimbaits
live shrimp
live finger mullet

thanks alot!
Let's go fishing!

Replies

  • nicknick Crystal RiverPosts: 4,994 Captain
    the best bait is the you have confidence in
  • DragScreamerDragScreamer Posts: 1,475 Officer
    yeah thats true but if i were to get serious and i have moderate confidence in all of them in what situations should i use what lure/bait? for reds trout and snook and pompano
    Let's go fishing!
  • nicknick Crystal RiverPosts: 4,994 Captain
    gulp!...end of story put it on a jighead, put it under a cork, or take a bath in the juice and let the fish come to you
  • SlackerSlacker Posts: 1,642 Captain
    spoon bass
    crankbait bass
    curly tail grubs 3-6 ft.
    jerkbaits shallow
    jigs 6-12 ft.
    popping corks 3-6 ft.

    shrimps deep or under float
    swimbaits shallow
    live shrimp when you are bored
    live finger mullet NE FL
  • DragScreamerDragScreamer Posts: 1,475 Officer
    Slacker wrote: »
    spoon bass
    crankbait bass
    curly tail grubs 3-6 ft.
    jerkbaits shallow
    jigs 6-12 ft.
    popping corks 3-6 ft.

    shrimps deep or under float
    swimbaits shallow
    live shrimp when you are bored
    live finger mullet NE FL
    im meant for saltwater inshore
    Let's go fishing!
  • YaksquatchYaksquatch Posts: 499 Officer
    Everyone's got their own style of fishing and you'll get a different answer from each person who replies. Part of what I enjoy so much about fishing is being able to constantly try new lures, techniques, and areas. The most important rule of fishing lures/baits is to NOT get stuck in a rut. Use something for 20-30min, if no bites then switch to something else. Keep switching till the fish tell you what they want.

    I personally would add topwater to your list and start with that first thing at sunrise. Once the sun's come up a bit, I like to switch to a shallow diving crankbait, especially over deep grass or along mangrove edges.

    Spoons are a favorite of mine on oyster bars and sand flats. Just cast and slowly retrieve. You'll feel the vibration in the rodtip as the spoon spins, just wait till a redfish whacks it and tries to rip the rod out of your hand. I personally don't use swimbaits much but I've heard of others who like them for a similar technique, just cast and retrieve slowly.

    Jigs and weedless soft plastics are a favorite of mine for fishing under docks and mangrove branches. Make sure to use a sharp hop, pause, hop, pause retrieve to illicit reaction strikes. You can try gulp if you want to get ripped off for buying 5 pieces of plastic. But I have just as good of luck with cheaper plastics like DOA CALs and Zoom Flukes.

    I get bored just fishing shrimp, mullet, or other live baits exclusively unless there's an active bite going on. I prefer to rig one up under a cork, toss it behind the boat or kayak, put the rod in the holder with loose drag and then fish artificials till the drag starts screaming.

    Again, do not get married to a single technique. If you've been working something for about half an hour and nothing's happening, then switch to something else!

    Good luck,
    Alex
  • PipefitterPipefitter Posts: 135 Officer
    Match the hatch and then get creative from there. 2nd option is to know what has been overabundant for a long time. Sometimes when I have been seeing big schools of sardines on the flats, I will switch to a shrimp pattern because I know they haven't had as many. Seems that fish get tired of eating the same thing over and over like we do.

    Anyone who has ever fished live bait for Snook for any amount of time can attest to this.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • DragScreamerDragScreamer Posts: 1,475 Officer
    Yaksquatch wrote: »
    Everyone's got their own style of fishing and you'll get a different answer from each person who replies. Part of what I enjoy so much about fishing is being able to constantly try new lures, techniques, and areas. The most important rule of fishing lures/baits is to NOT get stuck in a rut. Use something for 20-30min, if no bites then switch to something else. Keep switching till the fish tell you what they want.

    I personally would add topwater to your list and start with that first thing at sunrise. Once the sun's come up a bit, I like to switch to a shallow diving crankbait, especially over deep grass or along mangrove edges.

    Spoons are a favorite of mine on oyster bars and sand flats. Just cast and slowly retrieve. You'll feel the vibration in the rodtip as the spoon spins, just wait till a redfish whacks it and tries to rip the rod out of your hand. I personally don't use swimbaits much but I've heard of others who like them for a similar technique, just cast and retrieve slowly.

    Jigs and weedless soft plastics are a favorite of mine for fishing under docks and mangrove branches. Make sure to use a sharp hop, pause, hop, pause retrieve to illicit reaction strikes. You can try gulp if you want to get ripped off for buying 5 pieces of plastic. But I have just as good of luck with cheaper plastics like DOA CALs and Zoom Flukes.

    I get bored just fishing shrimp, mullet, or other live baits exclusively unless there's an active bite going on. I prefer to rig one up under a cork, toss it behind the boat or kayak, put the rod in the holder with loose drag and then fish artificials till the drag starts screaming.

    Again, do not get married to a single technique. If you've been working something for about half an hour and nothing's happening, then switch to something else!

    Good luck,
    Alex
    this is what im looking for thanks!
    Let's go fishing!
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