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Lets talk gardens.....

micci_manmicci_man Somewhere in FLPosts: 14,683 AG
Mine is coming along as well and about to be busy with it. Beans, peas and squash are blooming, Have peppers and maters on the bush, cukes and okra are a little behind. Tilled it up yesterday and added fert. So how is yours doing??

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Common Sense can't be bought, taught or gifted, yet it is one of the few things in life that is free, and most refuse to even attempt to possess it. - Miguel Cervantes
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  • QuailhunterQuailhunter Posts: 173 Deckhand
    We had lots of rain when I first planted so it got soaked and then just when the plants start doing good we a few cold nights in row and it has stunted the growth on my plants.
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 23,346 AG
    Your garden looks great Micci.


    Starting to harvest Big Boy tomatoes and some grape variety I got from a friend who got them in Mexico. They are yearly tasty weeds now. The Rutgers are not far off.

    Purple Ichiban eggplant are prolific to the extent of needing to batter and fry some for the freezer.

    Poblanos and Cubaniel peppers are coming along nicely (make good salsas and rellenos) and the Carabian Hots are almost ready.

    Have sever different kinds of mints (spear, pepper, lemon, chocolate) that are doing well and helpful in making sauces/salsas, mohitos and juleeps and to stick between your cheek and gum.

    Thyme (lemon and Italian), rosemary and lavender, oregano and sage are all doing well and eaten regularly in salads, sauces and meats.

    Chives and garlic chives are used in salads, dressings, sandwiches, etc.

    Cucumbers are still tiny, yellow squash and Seminole pumpkins still just flowers and Florida speckled butter beans still just vines.

    Sweet potatoes in their infancy.

    That's it for now.
  • ontheedge5658ontheedge5658 Posts: 2,668 Captain
    I don't have a garden but I have some info. My friend and I stopped by his friend after fishing on Friday. He has a backyard garden. He asked me if I like Tomatoes. I said yes. We did a taste test. He gave me 2 differently grown tomatoes. 1 grown in soil and the other grown Hydroponically. To my suprise the hydroponically grown ones were much sweeter and better tasting then the ones grown in the soil.
  • frankfrank Posts: 13,292 AG
    brb, i'll take a picture
  • Cut runnerCut runner Posts: 948 Officer
    These garden threads have inspired me.
    A couoke weeks ago I planted some strawberrys, grapes, watermelon, and bought some cilantro.
    Everything is growing suprisingly well given my absolute lack of garden knowledge.
    I have been watering with only collected rainwater off my roof. I have only a couple plants, nothing like micci
    Any tips?
    Do I need to germinate anything?
    I saw a ladybug on the strawberrys the other day, I let it be
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 23,346 AG
    Cut runner wrote: »
    These garden threads have inspired me.
    A couoke weeks ago I planted some strawberrys, grapes, watermelon, and bought some cilantro.
    Everything is growing suprisingly well given my absolute lack of garden knowledge.
    I have been watering with only collected rainwater off my roof. I have only a couple plants, nothing like micci
    Any tips?
    Do I need to germinate anything?
    I saw a ladybug on the strawberrys the other day, I let it be


    All sorts of good info, what to grow and when and how, how much per person, etc.

    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vh021
  • micci_manmicci_man Somewhere in FLPosts: 14,683 AG
    Rain water is best for a garden and really makes it jump but it doesn't rain around here much anymore so I have to irrigate. going to a drip system next year. My beans, peas, squash, cukes and okra were planted from seed. My maters and peppers were started from seed in a greenhouse by a friend and then I transplanted them when they were about 10-12" tall.

    Cat- if you don't have the space to plant in the ground several samll raised beds will produce really well and so will "bucket gardening". Building/making compost and adding it to your growing area really helps things along as well.

    I started this compost last spring and it is looking goot! All this pile is is leaves, mainly oak.

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    Common Sense can't be bought, taught or gifted, yet it is one of the few things in life that is free, and most refuse to even attempt to possess it. - Miguel Cervantes
  • Cut runnerCut runner Posts: 948 Officer
    Thanks
    Yea I put them in 5gallon pots for now, but my plan is 100% to build some raised beds.
    Since ive only got a couple plants I am using miracle grow "organic" topsoil bags.
    The sand at my house is almost pure sugar sand...
    The water melons are kickin **** and takin names, growin about an inch a day
  • frankfrank Posts: 13,292 AG
    scuse the poor ipod picture please
    tomatoes yet to turn red, or yellow, beans still bumper crop, cukes doing ok, zukes still producing, as are the peas
    still waiting for the cantaloup, eggplant, and peppers to do something
    had to pull the lettuce, got bitter from the heat, and planted watermelon in it's place
  • navigator2navigator2 Posts: 22,511 AG
    Grew 4 ten gallon pots of tomato's, one plant per pot, started them in Feb from seedlings. Had to drag them into the garage several times due to frost. I've picked 3 dozen or so and still producing, about a dozen fruits per plant in progress. Got bell peppers in pots, just small tots for now. Have another 8 pots of solar fire tomatoes that will probably fruit in late July. Cucumbers plants are behind but foilage has exploded and all are flowering, small plot about the size of Frank's. Growing the tomatos in pots is a lot more work than you think, dragging those 40 pound bags of topsoil around and pouring into pots is work.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • frankfrank Posts: 13,292 AG
    get a hand truck for your pots
    how often do you have to water them?
  • navigator2navigator2 Posts: 22,511 AG
    frank wrote: »
    get a hand truck for your pots
    how often do you have to water them?

    Every other day or so. In fact, this reminds me I need to fertilizer them again.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • rrbgttrrbgtt Posts: 6,758 Admiral
    Just started getting yellow squash and Zucchini out of mine. Okra, cukes, melons, etc. are still a ways off. I planted a little late.

    The tomatoes started out great on the patio in pots till worms got the best of us. Tried spectracide, dish soap, and sevin dust. Nothing, but picking them off worked and there were so many that Rhonda pulled 'em up and fed em to the cows. It was a small black/gray worm that I've never had before. I'm guessing they came in soil in the pots.

    Tori and Toni are supposed to be digging five 50' rows of potatoes today.
    From hell's heart I stab at thee; for hate's sake I spit my last breath at thee. Ye damned bobcat!
  • micci_manmicci_man Somewhere in FLPosts: 14,683 AG
    Was the worm about 3/8- 1/2" long and maybe a 1/16 to 1/8 in dia? One of my plant had holes eaten in the leaves and under a leave I found it hiding. I kilt it and so far so goot.
    Common Sense can't be bought, taught or gifted, yet it is one of the few things in life that is free, and most refuse to even attempt to possess it. - Miguel Cervantes
  • rrbgttrrbgtt Posts: 6,758 Admiral
    micci_man wrote: »
    Was the worm about 3/8- 1/2" long and maybe a 1/16 to 1/8 in dia? One of my plant had holes eaten in the leaves and under a leave I found it hiding. I kilt it and so far so goot.

    Some were that small, most were around 1 1/2" long. I've never had this type of worm before. Nothing we tried worked on them. We would pick them off and there would be 20 more on each plant the next day.
    From hell's heart I stab at thee; for hate's sake I spit my last breath at thee. Ye damned bobcat!
  • micci_manmicci_man Somewhere in FLPosts: 14,683 AG
    Hmmmm. Not sure about that one.
    Common Sense can't be bought, taught or gifted, yet it is one of the few things in life that is free, and most refuse to even attempt to possess it. - Miguel Cervantes
  • rrbgttrrbgtt Posts: 6,758 Admiral
    micci_man wrote: »
    Hmmmm. Not sure about that one.

    It was frustrating. The plants were doing well and were loaded with tomatoes. Oh, well. At least she picked the green ones and fried 'em up for me.

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    From hell's heart I stab at thee; for hate's sake I spit my last breath at thee. Ye damned bobcat!
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 23,346 AG
    Those little worms can be dealt with by hand picking and high pressure water but not high enough to harm the plant.

    They pop when you squish em.
  • rrbgttrrbgtt Posts: 6,758 Admiral
    Cyclist wrote: »
    Those little worms can be dealt with by hand picking and high pressure water but not high enough to harm the plant.

    They pop when you squish em.

    The patio is full of worm stains. We popped 'em till we finally decided it wasn't worth the battle. I'll just buy tomatoes at the flea market this year.
    From hell's heart I stab at thee; for hate's sake I spit my last breath at thee. Ye damned bobcat!
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 23,346 AG
    rrbgtt wrote: »
    The patio is full of worm stains. We popped 'em till we finally decided it wasn't worth the battle. I'll just buy tomatoes at the flea market this year.

    I lost the battle last year, but manged to stay on top this year. Shock and awe early can keep them in check, once they spread, things get dicier.

    Nothing wrong with flea market tomatoes.
  • navigator2navigator2 Posts: 22,511 AG
    rrbgtt wrote: »
    Some were that small, most were around 1 1/2" long. I've never had this type of worm before. Nothing we tried worked on them. We would pick them off and there would be 20 more on each plant the next day.

    Hornworms? Thurbicide spray. Gotta catch them early though, they march on like Sherman through Atlanta.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 23,346 AG
    navigator2 wrote: »
    Hornworms? Thurbicide spray. Gotta catch them early though, they march on like Sherman through Atlanta.

    They are tinier than horn worms and more prolific.
  • rrbgttrrbgtt Posts: 6,758 Admiral
    navigator2 wrote: »
    Hornworms? Thurbicide spray. Gotta catch them early though, they march on like Sherman through Atlanta.

    No, I've never had these worms before. Hornworms/tomato worms/tobacco worms have never been a problem. You can see the quickly because of the droppings and pull 'em off.

    they looked a lot like army worms.
    From hell's heart I stab at thee; for hate's sake I spit my last breath at thee. Ye damned bobcat!
  • navigator2navigator2 Posts: 22,511 AG
    rrbgtt wrote: »
    No, I've never had these worms before. Hornworms/tomato worms/tobacco worms have never been a problem. You can see the quickly because of the droppings and pull 'em off.

    I know what you are talking about, had some last year. Thurbicide kills them too.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • micci_manmicci_man Somewhere in FLPosts: 14,683 AG
    Dang Rusty :crying
    Common Sense can't be bought, taught or gifted, yet it is one of the few things in life that is free, and most refuse to even attempt to possess it. - Miguel Cervantes
  • micci_manmicci_man Somewhere in FLPosts: 14,683 AG
    I figured with all of the farmers on here there would be more gardeners too???? Do they just grow to make $$$
    Common Sense can't be bought, taught or gifted, yet it is one of the few things in life that is free, and most refuse to even attempt to possess it. - Miguel Cervantes
  • rrbgttrrbgtt Posts: 6,758 Admiral
    micci_man wrote: »
    I figured with all of the farmers on here there would be more gardeners too???? Do they just grow to make $$$

    There are no farmers, only evil corporations.
    From hell's heart I stab at thee; for hate's sake I spit my last breath at thee. Ye damned bobcat!
  • badbullgatorbadbullgator Posts: 1,599 Captain
    I have little ants tearing up my zucchini plants. They are getting inside the stalks and eating the fruit.
    "No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms. The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government"

    -- Thomas Jefferson, 1 Thomas Jefferson Papers, 334
  • SC53SC53 Posts: 614 Officer
    Navi is correct, BT (Thurbicide) will kill most caterpillars. Lady bugs eat the aphids but the ants will protect them. Kill the ants, protect the ladies.
    Back to the garden, we have harvested most of our spring crops as we planted very early to try and beat the bugs. We were pretty successful with that but had to deal with the cold weather so late in the spring.
    Right now we have tomatoes, peppers, zipper peas, sweet taters and okra for summer crops.
    Still growing from winter/spring are a few carrots, collards, kale, GA sweet onions, speckled limas and corn.
  • micci_manmicci_man Somewhere in FLPosts: 14,683 AG
    Back up
    Common Sense can't be bought, taught or gifted, yet it is one of the few things in life that is free, and most refuse to even attempt to possess it. - Miguel Cervantes
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